Trident Plastics’ four-wheel bins

Trident Plastics, the largest custom moulder in South Australia, has launched a new range of Australian made four-wheel bins for commercial and multi-unit dwelling use. The new 660 and 1100-litre bins are made of injection moulded high-density polyethylene (HDPE), which is UV stabilised to provide “excellent strength and durability”, as Trident explains, adding: “With our four- wheel bin range, we aim for excellent value for money in the same way that our two-wheel bins have become so popular in Australia and New Zealand in recent years.”

Featuring flat sides to enable pockets to be installed, as well as high quality wheels, two with locks, and noise reducing tyres, the new four-wheel range comes fully equipped and will be available in a whole range of colours for both body and lid.

Trident Plastics commenced manufacturing two- wheel bins in 2012 and has since increased its range each year. Now supplying 80, 100, 120, 140, 240 and 360-litre two-wheel bin sizes, the young company says the new four-wheel options further complete its portfolio.

All two and four-wheel bins are made under strict quality and environmental standards, such as ISO 9001 and ISO 14001.

www.tridentaustralia.com

Work to be done

Mike Ritchie, MRA Consulting

Mike Ritchie from Sydney-based consulting firm MRA reflects on the importance of solid groundwork in the political realm to facilitate real change in waste management. 

Our waste problems are urgent. Waste is pouring out of the economy at a compound average growth rate of 6.3 per cent, and waste volumes double every 12 years. To tackle the issue, most Australian States and Territories have set ambitious recycling targets for 2020/21.

For Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), the diversion target is generally 65 to 70 per cent, except in the ACT where it’s 85 per cent. For commercial & industrial (C&I) waste, the target is higher still – typically ranging from 70 to 80 per cent. Except, again, for the ACT, where it’s 85 per cent. The highest targets, meanwhile,
are reserved for construction and demolition (C&D) waste, with most state targets ranging from 75 to 85 per cent.

These are big numbers, and it’s still a long way to go until we reach them – particularly for MSW, where new data shows that diversion rates need to increase by about 50 per cent to stay on track. But there is no alternative: The work we need to do is important and structural, even though it can be unexciting. It’s work that is unlikely to capture the public’s imagination in the same way as single use battery, coffee cups, CDs or light bulbs might be able to.

 Some say that the scheme’s that get people’s attention, that win environment awards, are worth every cent because they attract media attention and money, as well as political capital. They connect people to waste problems.
But the problem is that money and political capital are not unlimited. Connecting people to waste problems is fine, but it doesn’t build infrastructure or set realistic market prices. What you spend on one project is not available to another. So, can we really afford ‘puff projects’?

Back and forth

Plastic bags for recycling

According to not-for-profit organisation Planet Ark, eight out of 10 Australian councils report plastic bags as their biggest recycling problem. Are we any closer to implementing a comprehensive national ban?  

The debate around the banning of single-use plastic bags is all but new, yet continues to spark controversy on a global level. While Australia is still in the process of putting a national policy on the issue in place – South Australia, Tasmania and the Australian Capital Territory have established plastic bag bans, while NSW, Queensland and Victoria have all committed to investigating the introduction of a ban – the US is currently experiencing a concerning turnaround on the topic: Last month, Michigan became the fourth US state to place a ban on banning plastic bags, following the example of Idaho, Arizona and Missouri.

To put the development into perspective and explain just why back-pedaling is not an option, Peter McLean, Executive Officer at the Australian Organics Recycling Association (AORA), summarises the state of play in Australia.

“AORA has held a long-term national policy on banning single-use plastic bags since 2015. We want to ensure that only Australian Standards (AI) certified compostable bags are exempt under any plastic bag legislation because they will break down under the parameters of a commercial composting facility.

Ensuring this very strict standard means that all other degradable, oxo- degradable and biodegradable plastic bags will also be banned, as there are no guarantees that these types of bags will break down under specific timeframes and not produce any residuals like micro-plastics.

The only fail-safe method with so much confusion about product claims in the marketplace is to use AS4736 for commercial composting and AS5810 for home composting. Even biodegradable bags need to be left aside, as biodegradable doesn’t always mean compostable. This is due to them not always meeting the Australian Standards in regards to time to decompose and complete biodegradation, which means they would have to leave zero residues other than some water, carbon dioxide and biomass.

This will also reduce the many deceptive statements currently in the marketplace, which allow manufacturers to use statements like ‘this product is degradable and breaks down when exposed to the environment’.

To read more, see page 52 of Issue 10. 

Making sustainability child’s play

A Melbourne-based company is combining puppet-making and trash to share the ‘reduce, reuse and recycle’ message. 

When I was young, my ambition was to be one of the people who made a difference in this world. My hope is to leave the world a little better for having been there.”

While Jim Henson’s famous saying may reflect a common-enough sentiment, but the incremental betterment of the world and humanity doesn’t usually cause puppets to spring to mind. For one Melbourne-based company, however, that is exactly what is entailed within its efforts to make the world a better place.

Jhess Knight worked within the local puppetry industry for the past five years before realising the joys of using recycled or reused materials. Alongside her good friend, Lucy Hedt, she has since developed the Trash Puppets initiative, which combines entertainment with education in the sustainability space.

“During my Master’s at the London School of Puppetry, we were encouraged to create mock-ups of our puppets. Quick and rough, a process that enabled us to see the design of our puppet and what the challenges might be,” explains Jhess. “Usually thrown together with basic materials such as newspaper or cardboard, I often found myself falling in love. Their simplicity was incredibly charming and made them even more magical when they came to life.”

The process of making Trash Puppets thus came about organically, and Jhess found the process to be therapeutic in its own right. “I knew this was something I wanted to share,” she says.

After having the idea suggested by a friend who works as a schoolteacher, Jhess and Lucy have gone on to create a profitable business in teaching kids to make puppets from rubbish – but it also has applications beyond the classroom.

To read more, see page 36 of Issue 10. 

Tying up loose ends

A New South Wales initiative is looking at how to recycle thousands of tonnes of textile waste – potentially creating a whole new business model along the way. 

The key to creating sustainable solutions to environmental problems is to build strong business cases around them. That is the approach Tom Davies and his team at Edge Environment took when they were tasked with finding an industrial solution to divert waste from landfill through the New South Wales Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Circulate program.

By engaging 1,000 medium-to-large enterprises, Circulate aims to divert some 160,000 tonnes of waste to landfill between 2014 and 2017 and generate $21 million in additional income or savings for those involved. The program is part of the NSW EPA’s Waste Less, Recycle More initiative, which uses funds from the waste levy to drive behaviour change, infrastructure investment and innovation in new resource recovery solutions.

As a starting point for the project, Davies and his team analysed a range of NSW commercial and industrial waste audits to determine the most significant material streams coming out of the State. “We’ve been working with a lot of large corporates as part of the process and a common issue proved to be workwear,” he says – adding that large companies go through hundreds of tonnes of workwear every year. “So we started investigating textiles as a waste.”

Textile as a waste

As part of his initial research, Davies found that NSW generates about 153,000 tonnes of textile waste per year – the whole of Australia produces about 375,000 tonnes – and most of that is going directly to landfill. Of that textile waste, a massive 64 per cent is corporate workwear, a ratio too big to ignore, as Davies points out: “You need to find a starting point.

“To us, it quickly became clear that point had to be corporate workwear – it’s a huge volume of manmade bres that could be turned into new products.”

Davies points to the iconic Australia Post organisation as an example for smart bre-recycling: “Australia Post had 200 tonnes of textiles as redundant stock that it had accumulated over two years, as it’s constantly evolving its uniforms. To address the problem, they teamed up with Dunlop and turned the waste into carpet underlay.”

While highly effective, the solution was a one-off only, Davies says: “What we were looking for was a long-term, self-sustaining solution. We roughly knew the breakdown of those materials, so it was obvious it was all valuable stuff that was ending up in landfill,” he explains.

Read the full story on page 26 of Issue 10. 

TailGuard for garbage vehicles

Reversing is one of the most dangerous truck operating procedures, which is why WABCO’s TailGuard was designed to help reduce fatalities on the road by detecting small, large, static and moving objects in the blind spot behind a vehicle.

The device is automatically activated when the gearbox is shifted into reverse, with TailGuard detecting all objects within three metres of the vehicle. The Trailer
Remote Control is activated, and a warning

signal sounds to indicate to the driver that the system is active. It also automatically stops at a programmable distance between 50cm and 200cm, so the driver can then slowly reverse the last few centimetres, if needed.

An easy to operate remote control includes an audible alarm, distance indicator and function buttons. The company notes its defining features which make it a unique solution, including ultrasonic sensor technology, allowing for object detection in conditions with poor visibility and complying with best-in-class automotive standard ISO 12155 for reversing systems for commercial road vehicles.

The system also comes with a cabin-mounted device for the driver indicating the distance. The combination of TailGuard and braking technology provide unique functions, including automatic stopping, forced slowing and distance programmability. In addition, the system can be retro-fitted before, or during a new build.

www.wabco-auto.com/wabco

CAT Microgrid Master Controller

Caterpillar has expanded its power generation offering into renewable energy. The company has developed a strategic partnership with First Solar to create an integrated photovoltaic (PV) solar solution for microgrid applications, which are used in various applications.

The Cat renewable energy system is powered by thin-film solar panels, with performance efficiencies over other types of solar panels. The thin-film technology has a lower temperature derate ratio, so installed in an application where the operating temperature is greater than 30°C, the panel operates more efficiently than other solar options. A key component in the Cat Hybrid Microgrid system is the Cat Bi-directional Power Inverter (BDP).

The BDP inverter includes the robust Cat power electronics system. This is known for its operational capabilities, having been used in the Caterpillar D7e hybrid tractor, and ideal for the harsh Australian climate.

The energy storage technology includes lithium ion and the revolutionary zinc metal-air energy storage system. This storage system is one of the lowest cost electricity storage options available. The system includes standard integrated controls and battery monitoring at the cell level. A fully flexible offering enables a combination of these two technologies, while Catepillar’s engineers design the energy storage system according to the needs of the business.

Ron Hall, Segment Manager, Hybrid Microgrid Systems from Energy Power Systems Australia (EPSA) says Caterpillar and EPSA recognise the need to live in a sustainable manner with our environment.

“This new product range is the culmination of millions of dollars in research and development over several years. It combines high performance, project integration and after sales service with state of the art renewable power and the revolutionary Cat energy storage system.”

www.cat.com