Palfinger: hooked on expansion

Kelly’s Waste Management has invested in a new Palfinger hookloader to maximise payloads and support expected growth in Tasmania’s resource recovery sector.

Tasmania’s resource recovery sector is expected to grow once the state’s new Waste Action Plan is implemented.

The plan sets a transition framework for the state’s waste sector through a series of ambitious resource recovery targets. Targets include achieving an 80 per cent average recovery rate from all waste streams by 2030.

To capitalise on anticipated economic growth and grow their collection fleet, Kelly’s Waste Management has invested in a new Palfinger Hookloader to maximise payloads.

Kelly’s operates out of Romaine in north-west Tasmania, an area with substantial parklands and a growing population. Key industries include heavy manufacturing, forestry and farming and, as a result, the region produces a sizeable amount of waste.

John Kelly, Kelly’s Waste Management Director, says the family-owned and operated business has been providing environmental solutions to Tasmania for over 50 years.

John explains that after purchasing a Volvo truck with a mounted Palfinger unit, he was impressed with how well it performed.

He adds that noticing how the unit supported consistent operations and driver performance inspired him to contact Stuart Cameron, Palfinger’s Key Account Manger.

After explaining Kelly’s application requirements, John says Stuart suggested a telescopic T22A hookloader.

“We required a unit that could carry our large waste transfer bins, as well as our general hooklift and vacuum hooklift tankers,” John says.

In addition to carrying large waste transfer bins, Kelly’s required a unit to accommodate a dismount vacuum container.

“Kelly’s had worked with Palfinger in the past and I knew they could supply a unit to facilitate all of this in the one truck,” John says.

“We initially hired Palfinger to fit the unit but ended up needing a lot more, including a vac system hydraulics installation, which they accommodated.”

John says the unit’s high-tensile steel reduces hookloader weight, allowing the company to significantly increase payloads.

“Optimised weight also increases longevity and reduces fuel cost, which is a plus given our large area of operations,” he says.

The T22A hookloader is a bi-point unit, meaning horizontal forces are reduced and tipping capacity is increased.

Additionally, the unit comes with an automatic mechanical safety latch that secures containers from falling during loading and unloading. John says drivers can open the latch on demand.

“Our drivers love the easy operation and control they have over the unit,” he says.

“It assists smooth operation, safety and reliability, which drivers say helps them run efficient and predictable routes.”

The T22A allows for the use of multi-length containers and features integrated in-cab controls, that position the articulated arm during low loading situations and allows a maximum tipping angle of 48 degrees.

Before assembling, the unit’s main components are sandblasted, degreased, primer painted, and electro-statically coated according to customer specifications. All additional parts are treated for anti-corrosion, maximising the life of the unit and providing a greater re-sale value.

According to John, the Palfinger T22A Hookloader has run smoothly since joining the Kelly’s fleet.

“The unit is really helping us keep up with demand, while also guaranteeing a quality of service to councils, industry and the wider public,” John explains.

“With this hooklift, Kelly’s can continue to grow and expand our range of waste services.”

John says Stuart and the wider Palfinger sales team were in regular contact throughout the unit build.

He adds that spare parts are only a phone call away, with Stuart travelling down from Victoria to oversee the handover, training and first few days of operation in the field went smoothly.

“I’ve worked with Palfinger in the past, and while the superior quality of their units is unquestionable, it’s their commitment to service and ensuring the unit matches our requirements that keeps me coming back,” John says.

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Finlay: woodchips to energy

Veolia’s recent moves in the waste-to-energy market has seen them team up with specialist equipment supplier Finlay.

Populations are growing and, as a result, so too is waste generation. Conversely, landfill capacity is declining as urban areas become increasingly dense.

While the waste hierarchy privileges avoidance, reuse and recycling, interest in waste-to-energy as a solution for material that falls through the cracks is growing. Capturing this potential was the driving force behind Veolia’s decision to open a new facility in Horsley Park, New South Wales.

According to site manager Stephen Bernhart, the new resource recovery facility handles wood waste material, which it then processes into a wood chip product.

“After running multiple equipment trials in 2018, we have recently kicked into operation,” Stephen says.

He adds that the wood chip product will be provided to a customer where it will be used as a substitute for coal within a cement kiln.

Veolia’s facility processes a significant amount of wood waste, such as pallets, offcuts and plywood which need to be shredded, and has the capacity to receive 430,000 tonnes of general solid non-putrescible waste per year.

“We have detailed specifications we need to meet to supply our waste-to-energy customer, and a big part of that is ensuring we achieved a material size sub 50 millimetres,” he says.

“It’s quite a challenging task because it’s such a small grade, so we decided to invite multiple suppliers out to the site to run tests and demonstrate their equipment.”

Stephen says Finlay Screening, Crushing and Recycling Systems, a supplier of screening and processing equipment for the waste and recycling industry, stood out during the trials.

“Finlay were heads and shoulders above the rest in demonstrating not just what their equipment could achieve, but how it could achieve it consistently,” he explains.   

Finlay initially trialed a medium speed shredder, however, the resulting material didn’t quite meet specifications. Three weeks later they were back, with a Terex Finlay 693+ Super Track Screening Plant that, according to Stephen, worked extremely well.

“During the second trial there was a large lump of steel which had passed through the primary shredder into the secondary shredder,” Stephen says.

“The TDSV20 shredder shut down as intended, and Finlay representatives opened it up to remove the steel. The machine was back up and running in approximately three minutes – I was very impressed with how the equipment handled it.”

According to Stephen, Finlay also demonstrated how the shredding equipment could maintain the required tonnage throughput in spite of the small material specifications.

In addition to the screening plant, Stephen purchased a Terex Finlay TDS 820 Slow Speed Shredder and a Terex Finlay TDS V20 Mid Speed Shredder and Finlay 5032HD wheeled conveyor.

Built to process bulky, solid waste, the TDS 820 has a two-metre shaft manufactured with a fully welded tooth configuration. Stephen explains that the length allows for significant throughput and size reduction of material.

“The machine’s independent gearboxes enable each shaft to be run separately, which reduces material wrappage and facilitates viable shredding,” he adds.

The Terex Mid Speed Shredder has a twin-shaft, allowing it to perform both primary and secondary shredding. The TDS V20 also has the ability to self-protect against uncrushable material like steel, making it well suited to shredding waste wood materials.

“We have had no trouble meeting specifications after procuring the equipment, all three machines have been running very well.”

According to Stephen, there has been very little down time at the Horsley Park facility.

“There were one or two minor teething issues initially, but Finlay were able to handle them quickly and without fuss,” he says.

Finlay representatives also assisted on-site equipment training when the facility was commissioned.

“They are very forthcoming with their information and we were able to get local contractors trained up on how to run and maintain the shredders and screening plant as well,” he says.

“We are at a really exciting stage in our capability with an eye for expansion, so it’s crucial to have equipment that’s both reliable and efficient.”

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The behaviour changing bins

A well-designed bin could change the way individuals interact with waste and recycling in the workplace, writes Dan Crawford, Method Australia Business Development Manager.

Why do aesthetics matter when it comes to a bin?

A seemingly unimportant factor of a formerly ‘basic’ office fixture became the foundation of the award-winning bins from Method Recycling.

The beautiful bins have helped leading organisations around the world to recycle more and waste less.

Method has quickly emerged as the preferred waste and recycling solution for modern offices, workspaces, venues and facilities around the world.

The bins have a proven record of diverting waste from landfill and are featured in leading spaces including Foster + Partners, the Sydney Cricket Ground, Canva, Atlassian, Qantas and many more.

Method began when co-founders Steven and India Korner continuously saw organisations that wanted to recycle, without the tools to be successful.

Bins and recycling systems had often been an afterthought – with ugly bins hidden in cupboards and kitchens, or desk bins – both of which don’t encourage or facilitate recycling.

The Korners believed that a well-designed bin could change the way individuals interact with waste and recycling in the workplace, and it has.

With the desire to make a visible difference, they set off on a three-year journey of research and development to understand the needs of all those involved in a buildings waste and recycling process.

They held focus groups, developed prototypes, and even helped cleaners on the night shift to gain a truly holistic view and ensure that the bins worked for everyone.

More than just a bin, the Korners created a system that is considered, well designed and purposeful.

Recycling is no longer an afterthought, but instead a featured part of workspace design.

Open Plan Recycling

Through the design process, Method pioneered Open Plan Recycling – a new philosophy of workspace recycling and waste.

Method’s bins are designed to be placed together to form flexible recycling stations, that are then located consistently throughout an open-plan space. These flexible stations mean that organisations can easily adapt the Method system to their needs; adding or moving waste streams as their needs change, or based on feedback from users.

Single bins or smaller stations can also be placed where recyclables are produced to maximise results; such as a paper bin next to the printer or an organics bin in the kitchen.

In its most simple form, this changes the way that individuals interact with waste and recycling in the workplace. By removing desk bins users are unable to simply throw their waste away without a thought. Instead, recycling bins are available alongside all general waste bins.

Further, having consistent recycling stations throughout a building standardises recycling. Consistency in location, streams and colour-coding means that through regular interaction recycling becomes an unconscious behaviour.

One of the fundamental principles that makes Method’s philosophy successful is visibility – so the appearance of the bins is crucial.

Method’s bins are designed to be out in the open as a visible statement of an organisations commitment to recycling and sustainability.

Further, the visibility also increases awareness and accountability, while instilling a collective culture of responsibility into an organisation – changing recycling behaviours at work and subsequently at home.

The New Method in Practice

Having worked with an array of organisations around the world, Method has continued to find that the bins can have a significant impact.

The durable bins are made from 50 per cent recycled materials and are fully recyclable at the end of their life, so you can feel confident you are making a sustainable choice.

Design giant Canva introduced Method bins as they were working towards some lofty sustainability goals.

They continued to grow rapidly with new offices around the world so needed a recycling system that was simple to implement and maintain, while complementing their beautifully designed offices.

Canva’s Global Office Architect Shamal Singh says Method’s bins allow the sometimes daunting task of having four waste and recycling options to be manageable and scalable across our ever-expanding offices.

The results of Methods bins speak for themselves. Westpac Bank in New Zealand reduced waste to landfill from 70 per cent to 40 per cent. Meanwhile, Palmerston North City Council reduced waste to landfill by 62 per cent in three months.

Can Method help you achieve your recycling and sustainability goals? Click here.

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Dust control and sweeping

Tailored dust control equipment can maintain workplace safety and minimise environmental impact, writes Tennant Company. 

Challenging environments like landfills, waste transfer stations and heavy vehicle workshops demand robust, built-to-last cleaning solutions.

With its extensive line-up of waste and heavy industry machinery, Tennant Company delivers on productivity, durability and workplace health and safety efficiencies.

As ever-more stringent protocols are implemented across Australia, designed to keep workforces safe and minimise environmental impact, demand has never been higher for total equipment solutions that can tick all the boxes and exceed productivity expectations.

Dust control and sweeping 

Our waste industry customers deploy Tennant’s Sentinel High-Performance Rider Sweeper for their waste transfer and landfill operations.

The extreme levels of dust and other pollutants are simply no match for the PM-10 certified Sentinel, also valued for its four-wheel power steering, tight turning circle and maneuverability to gain access between stockpiles, without impeding traffic.

The Tennant 800 Industrial Ride-On Sweeper is another popular unit used by customers in the waste industry.

It maximises cleaning productivity with its wide cleaning path, large (up to 907 kilogram) capacity hopper and operator-friendly features.

Capable of capturing dust to heavy debris, its heavy-duty T-beam steel construction and high-performance dust containment system make it ideal for Australia’s harsh environments.

Tennant offers a line of Compact Ride-On Sweepers including the 6100, 6200 and S20, also employed by waste enterprises of all sizes, as well as warehouse & logistics customers.

Designed for optimal maneuverability and single pass sweeping the available multi-stage dust control systems, can capture dust particles as small as 0.5 microns in size.

Also supplied to the waste industry is the S10 Walk-Behind Sweeper, which protects employees and facilities by tackling work bay dust capturing particles as small as three microns in size.

Simultaneous Sweeping and Scrubbing

Where large quantities of wet debris, dirt and oil needs to be cleaned up quickly, Tennant’s line-up of Sweeper-Scrubbers are infinitely up to the task.

The M-Series machines sweep and scrub simultaneously and are available with a range of power sources (battery, LPG or Diesel) depending on your facility requirement.

The M17 is an all-electric (fume free) Ride-On Sweeper-Scrubber equipped with DFS (dual force sweeping) technology and will maintaining indoor air quality with its a two-stage dust control system.

Cleaning time is extended with the largest available battery capacity in its class.

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GCM Enviro: brooklyn bound

Sunshine Groupe Operations Manager Colin Riley tells Waste Management Review how the rise in construction and demolition waste prompted their latest purchase.

With capital injections at a state and federal level, the Australian construction industry is booming.

Capital influx, paired with growing public consciousness around the impacts of waste and the reality of finite resources, has led to an increased number of construction companies seeking sustainable solutions for their construction and demolition waste (C&D).

Located within a 10-kilometre proximity of the Melbourne CBD, Sunshine Groupe’s Brooklyn recycling site has become a hub for the city’s C&D waste.

Operations Manager Colin Riley says C&D is now one of the company’s most commonly received waste streams.

“We are heavily invested in safeguarding the community and the environment through recycling, and as such need effective and accurate equipment to separate heavy impurities from the material we want to process,” Colin says.

“I’ve been working at Sunshine Groupe for over 20 years and the rise in C&D is substantial. A number of challenges come with that given the materials high variability and substantial weight.”

Colin says the scale of the Brooklyn site is what inspired the need for a new for a new piece of mobile sifting equipment.

“We already have lot of fixed processing equipment on site but are dealing with significant space and multiple stockpiles. Transporting waste around the site to access that fixed equipment was becoming unsustainable,” Colin says.

“After consulting with GCM Enviro, we decided to purchase a moveable Terra Select W80 Windsifter four months ago and its really solved that issue for us.”

The Terra Select W80 mobile windsifter separates stones from wood materials, wood from building rubble and impurities from aggregate.

“We depend on cleanly separated feedstock so recycled components can be further processed. Our situation is therefore ideally suited to separation via windsifting,” Colin says.

According to Colin, Sunshine Groupe use the Terra Select windsifter to process roughly 50,000 tonnes of material each day.

“The Terra Select outperforms all other windsifters I’ve used and has far exceeded my expectations,” Colin says.

The sifter can achieve a throughput of up to 120 cubic metres per hour and has an adjustable level of cleaning of up to 95 per cent, with an optimum feed grain size of one to four.

In addition to its own feed hopper, the mobile windsifter also has an integrated metering roller that Colin says enables fast turnaround times.

“The machine has flexible options for feeding material, which we can adjust depending on the specifics of what we are working with at the time,” Colin says.

“It can be adjusted to work either at an angle with a wheeled loader, or at an angle from an upstream screening plant. The dosing roller then evenly feeds the material from the hopper to the windsifter.”

If required, the discharge conveyor of the separator can be fitted with a magnet to remove metals from building rubble, further highlighting its application use for varied waste streams like C&D.

The machine is controlled centrally via a modern display, with all machine components readily accessible due to large maintenance hatches. Additionally, it is driven by its own high-output diesel engine, which supports total mobile function.

“It’s a mobile machine in every sense of the word and can be completely set up and functional within a short space of time for new locations or feedstock changeover. It also has road approval for off-site operations,” Colin says.

In addition to separation, the windsifting process protects other machines and plants by removing heavy debris before later processing stages.

When dealing with stone or concrete for example, sifting removes potentially harmful objects, purifies the material before crushing and leads to a longer shelf life for all machinery involved.

“GCM Enviro really pulled through for us, we told them what we needed, and they delivered on all fronts,” Colin says.

“The servicing and parts department is really on the ball – if we make a spare or extra parts order it arrives the following day.”

Colin says while he hasn’t needed to take them up on the offer yet, GCM Enviro has committed to sending service and maintenance teams downs to Melbourne if any issues arise.

“I’ve been in the industry for over two decades and have seen a lot of equipment, some that works well, some that doesn’t,” Colin says.

“The Terra Select W80 works so well because it takes a lot of different technology types and combines them, really expanding the capabilities of a relatively small machine.”

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NHP Electrical Engineering: controlling pumps and scarcity

NHP Electrical Engineering Smart Motor Control systems provide real-time operational disruption data and energy efficient pumping to wastewater facilities.

Australia’s dry and inconsistent climate poses a challenge to water security. As a consequence, increasing the capacity of wastewater recycling facilities is vital to mitigating resource scarcity and increasing climate resistance.

Recycling wastewater can ease pressure on water resources and avoid the need to discharge the material into the environment.

Managing masses of liquid can be challenging, however, given the rheological makeup of the material.

For wastewater facilities to operate effectively, they require centralised pumping systems supported by reliable motor control.

Power distribution, automation and motor control specialists NHP Electrical Engineering Products (NHP) have been operating in the wastewater space for decades.

Michael Liberatore, NHP Automation, Safety and Motor Control Business Manager, says within the digitised modern world, it’s important that NHP can deliver customer-focused Industrial Internet of Things initiatives and tools.

“Water is an essential input that feeds the production cycle of almost all other industries,” Michael says.

“In the contemporary climate, where limited water resources and concerns about the environmental impact of electricity production are real, innovation is central to success.”

According to Michael, Smart Motor Control is one of many innovative solutions supported by the company. He adds that efficient motor control enables application flexibility, as well as higher productivity and workplace safety.

“At the core of this are inventive solutions that provide a reliable supply of water to minimise network upgrade disruptions and optimise capital investment.”

Michael says Smart Motor Control supports secure wastewater networks by enabling real-time monitoring and asset management. Additionally, he says 75 per cent of motor control failures can be prevented by applying appropriate protection measures.

“Efficient motors drive wastewater management performance, and the impact of motor failure can be significant,” he explains.

“With Smart Motor Control devices, clients can improve productivity and help avoid motor failures with an integrated, data-driven approach.”

Michael says the technology diagnoses problems early and identifies where they are, which allows clients to transform data into actionable information to reduce production losses.

Michael says Smart Motor Control systems minimise energy expenditure by reducing overall system power requirements and wear and tear on equipment.

“Smart Motor Control can be easily integrated into clients’ existing motor control systems to offer higher productivity and shorter downtimes,” he explains.

Be it pumping station treatment plants or pipelines, Michael says NHP can provide complete solutions for the most complex water and wastewater applications.

NHP offers a complete portfolio of Smart Motor Control solutions, from simple fixed and variable speed control to precise torque and position control.

“With Smart Motor Control Devices, energy consumption can be monitored on each motor individually at any point,” he explains.

“Our Smart Motor Control solution helps customers achieve advanced pressure and flow control, including soft start, stop capabilities and energy savings.”

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Major tender awarded

The Tarp Deployment System has secured a deal with one of America’s largest waste management contractors, expanding on its reputation in the US and Australia.

The Tarp Deployment System (TDS) has been making significant inroads in the waste sector in Australia and internationally.

In one of the TDS’ biggest successes to date, manufacturers Southwestern Sales Company has been awarded a contract to supply five tarpARMOR TDS Tarp Deployment Systems to one of America’s largest waste management contractors – Waste Management Inc (turnover US $14.5 billion).

The tarping systems will be delivered within a three-week period to provide alternate daily cover for landfills in Louisiana and Mississippi.

The tarpARMOR systems, with patented reusable cover tarps, were selected over many other alternatives to replace soil and non-reusable film that were used for daily cover.   

According to South Western Sales Marketing Manager Shannon Harrop, the tender was hotly contested with all major American suppliers of daily cover systems – tarps, spray-on systems and non-reusable film, submitting proposals.

The tarpARMOR systems were selected due to their ability to improve operational efficiencies and a daily cover cost reduction that is one-tenth of the existing cover methods. Also attractive was the TDS’ design simplicity resulting in minimum service requirements, safety and spool capacity.

According to Australian TDS distributor Jaylon, these same features have resulted in sales figures in Australia exceeding expectations.

Manager Alan Liebeck says councils and waste operators in Australia can purchase a TDS unit in Australia in the full knowledge that operators throughout North America and in every state in Australia see the same value.

“In almost every Australian case study, the payback period is less than two years when comparing the cost of covering with tarps in comparison to soil. When the opportunity cost of lost airspace is taken into consideration the economics are even more attractive,” Alan says.

One of the most often asked questions regarding tarp cover systems is their ability to withstand windy conditions.

The best testimonial for the TDS units patented tarpLOX system is its ability to withstand Cyclone Marcus, which hit Darwin in March 2018 with sustained winds of 95 kilometres an hour and wind gusts of more than 130 kilometres an hour.

Four months earlier, Darwin City Council purchased a TDS unit with four standard 32-metre tarps each with six ballast cables for use at the Shoal Bay Landfill, sixteen kilometres from Darwin.

All four tarps were on the tip face when the cyclone reached Darwin and it was not until the next day that the tarps could be checked.

After surveying the damage to the city, the landfill operators were expecting the worse and were resigned to the tarps being somewhere in the Kakadu National Park. Upon inspection, they were pleasantly surprised to see all four tarps in place just as they were left prior to the cyclone.

Landfill Manager Aaron Sacagio at the time commented “well if you need evidence that your tarps can withstand 100 kilometres per hour winds then here it is”.

The TDS units are available with a range of accessories including security engine covers, lights and an odour control spray system.

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AgSafe: operation chemical clear

As drumMUSTER celebrates its 20th birthday, AgSafe General Manager Dominique Doyle talks to Waste Management Review about the program’s history.

The agricultural and veterinary (AgVet) chemical classification applies to a range of products developed to protect crops, livestock and domestic animals.

According to the Federal Agriculture Department, AgVet chemicals have produced long-term benefits for Australian agriculture by reducing the effects of weeds, pests and diseases on agricultural and forest production.

This has led to increased productivity, better quality produce, more competitive industries and improved environmental outcomes.

Industry benefit aside, AgVet chemicals and containers create disposal challenges given their composition, ingredients and flammability.

Taking growing hazardous waste rates into account, specialised product stewardship schemes for AgVet products have become critical to managing the agricultural industry sustainably.   

For more than 20 years, AgSafe has worked with rural businesses to promote workplace health and safety practices for AgVet products.

According to General Manager Dominique Doyle, AgSafe achieves this though its chemical and drum collection product stewardship schemes drumMUSTER and ChemClear.

Dominique says drumMUSTER was one of the first product stewardship programs established in Australia. She adds that it is now internationally recognised as a leading example of how the agricultural industry and individual farmers can work together.

She says that for decades, some farmers had been dealing with plastic and metal packaging for AgVet chemicals by burning or burying the material. Dominique adds that stockpiles often piled up.

In 1993, the AgVet Association launched Operation Clean Rinse, with the aim of educating farmers on proper rinsing, cleaning and disposal of chemical containers.

“Operation Clean Rinse served as a precursor to drumMUSTER, which launched five years later,” Dominique says.

The first drumMUSTER collection took place May 1999 in Gunnedah NSW, and since then, the program has collected 33.5 million AgVet containers for recycling.

“That equates to 38,000 tonnes of waste that would have otherwise been sent to landfill, buried or burnt on farms,” Dominique says.

Like most product stewardship schemes, drumMUSTER is financed through a levy.

According to Dominique, participating chemical manufacturers incorporate a six-cent-per-litre charge into the cost of non-returnable chemicals at purchase.

“The levy enables collections across rural Australia at council waste transfer stations, where farmers leave empty AgVet containers for collection by accredited processors,” Dominique says.

“The drums are inspected by drumMUSTER trained inspectors and then transported to recycling facilities.”

drumMUSTER collection sites are mostly located in waste transfer stations operated by regional councils. At the time of writing, 349 councils operated collections at over 800 sites.

She says that as a voluntary program, the drumMUSTER product stewardship program has adapted to fit the needs of councils, farmers, retailers and manufacturers of the chemicals.

Drums Go Round, a recycling company operating in NSW and Victoria, has been working with drumMUSTER since the program began.

According to Drums Go Round Manager Cindy Taylor, the company processes around half a million drumMUSTER containers each year.

“We granulate or shred drumMUSTER material on site with mobile plants to reduce the number of times the product needs to be handled before sale,” Cindy says.

“The material can then be remanufactured into products such as wheelie bins, irrigation and drainage pipes, fencing posts, road signage, outdoor furniture and garden stakes.”

Dominique says while drumMUSTER facilitates recovery options for empty containers, the dilemma of leftover chemicals is similarly significant to the agricultural industry.

Given the safety imperatives of proper chemical disposal, AgSafe developed drumMUSTER’s sister program ChemClear in 2003, using funds from the drumMUSTER levy.

ChemClear operates as a collection and disposal service for unwanted and unknown AgVet chemicals. Farmers and other agricultural industry professionals register their waste with the program and relinquish chemicals for safe removal.

Group one chemicals, including those housed in their original container with a readable label with the drumMUSTER logo, are eligible for free collection.

Group two chemicals, such as those no longer registered, unlabelled or expired, have a variable per-litre fee applied.

Dominique says approximately 80 per cent of all AgVet chemical manufacturers in Australia are involved with the program.

In the year of drumMUSTER’s 20th birthday, Dominique says AgSafe intends to continue expanding the program’s reach.

“We will continue to engage with members and industry stakeholders on how best to expand our operations, with a specific focus on metropolitan and peri-urban areas,” Dominique says.

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Finlay: separating the grime

Phoenix Environment Group is sorting problematic C&D waste from all over Melbourne into saleable streams, with the assistance of Finlay Screening, Crushing and Recycling Systems.

Mixed waste from construction and demolition sites is regularly left out in the rain or intense heat for long periods of time by some contractors and site managers. As a result, construction and demolition waste (C&D) often arrives at processing and recycling facilities as a wet, sticky mass, loaded with heavy and bulky debris.

Phoenix Environment Group, a recycling company based in Melbourne’s northern suburbs, receives waste from all over the city and deals primarily in C&D. Phoenix operates largely as a sorting facility, separating C&D into seven different streams before sending it to alternate facilities for remanufacturing.    

Company Director Ash Walker says given the nature of C&D, the material Phoenix receives is often quite contaminated, with multiple mixed materials needing to be screened and separated simultaneously.

To facilitate the cleaning of grimy material, Phoenix purchased a Terex TRS 500 from specialist equipment suppliers Finlay Screening, Crushing and Recycling Systems last year.

“We needed a recycling screen capable of separating heavy weight material from recyclable waste before we send it to separate picking stations for further separation,” Ash says.

“Our previous screen worked well. However, as the company grew and began to work with larger, more commercial clients, we required a new recycling screen to keep up with processing demands.”

The TRS 500 recycling screen is a versatile mobile screen that operates with a specialist screen box designed by German manufacturer Spaleck.

Ash says he spent a number of months researching recycling screens online before coming across the TRS 500.

After contacting Finlay about the machine, Ash was flown to Queensland to view the screen in operation.

“Once I had watched the TRS 500 in action at Finlay’s facility in Burpengary, I became confident in its ability to fulfil Phoenix’s business requirements,” Ash says.

“The Terex machine is much bigger than our previous screen, so we are able to put significantly more material through each hour – it ticked all the boxes for me.”

Phoenix has been using the TRS 500 for just under 12 months, and Ash says it hasn’t missed a beat.

“We use the screen to reclaim a lot of mixed soil and it works 100 per cent of the time,” Ash says.

“Every inch of soil is screened and cleaned effectively and quickly, which means we can remove all the contaminants at a cheap price.”

According to Ash, the machine was specifically designed for difficult applications, with the combination of a three-way split system and Spaleck 3D Combi screen box allowing operators to process material previously classed as problematic.

Phoenix uses the TRS 500 to process a minimum of 2000 tonnes of C&D waste at its Coolaroo recycling centre each month.

“Most of our material comes from Campbellfield Bins, Ben’s Bins Hire, Cleanaway and a handful of smaller waste removal companies,” Ash says.

Spaleck screen boxes are designed for efficient screening of wet inhomogeneous material, with separation cuts between 0.2 and 50 millimetres.

The TRS 500 incorporates the Spaleck screen box into a standard Terex platform and frame, with features including a steel apron feeder for feeding heavy bulk material, a 3D top deck screening panel and an aggressive flip-flow bottom deck.

The base frame is agitated by a shaft and unbalanced motor drive, with the vibration passed to the frame via thrust rubbers.

Ash says the tracked heavy duty screen can be operated in a wide range of primary and secondary screening applications.

“The 3D flip flow bottom deck mats can handle high-moisture material, even when screening as small as two millimetres without blinding,” Ash says.

“This ability is critical given the nature of the material we’re processing, as it reduces downtime and maximises our production capabilities.”

Additionally, Ash says the TRS’s 3D screening segments facilitate correct grain size and eliminate long and extraneous material for the tension shaft screen on the lower deck.

“The screwless mounted screening mats create less contamination than regular mats and the high acceleration has a self-cleaning effect,” he says.

Ash says Finlay has a services and parts division in Melbourne, meaning it is just around the corner when the machine needs servicing.

“They respond straight away when I make a booking and are always on call. I’ve been really happy with the service,” Ash says.

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NSW EPA: let’s chat compost

The NSW Environment Protection Authority has developed an engaging conversational learning program to support professional development in the organics sector.

Simulated conversational experiences, or chatbots, have been gaining traction across numerous industries.

Conversational learning is a unique concept that delivers knowledge in focused, micro-learning chunks, requiring only three to five minutes of a learner’s time.

It aims to put learners in control, use conversation and story-telling to stimulate engagement, build knowledge and allow for active discovery and decision making.

With an increase in chatbot messenger apps offering instantaneous customer service, news and other relevant notifications, chatbot experiences are even making inroads in the waste sector.

To support the compost industry, e-learning provider IMC has been working with the Environment Protection Authority (EPA) via its organics program.

IMC and the EPA have developed four-five minute chatbot modules dubbed “Let’s Chat Compost” on the topics of assessing odour, pasteurisation, composting and managing contamination.

The learning sessions aim to simulate ordinary conversations, akin to those you’d have with a friend or colleague – personal, fun and to the point.

They embed personality into the learning content and create a dynamic interaction like one-on-one teaching, making social and interactive e-learning “in dialogue” possible.

The Let’s Chat Compost modules allow users to continue or refresh their learning through the EPA’s existing Compost Facility Management eLearning program, released at the end of last year.

Presented in social media messenger style, the app uses conversation and memes to engage learners to expand on their composting knowledge.

The Compost Facility Management course comprises seven modules and has been designed for regulators and people in all roles working in organics facilities.

It uses interactive content, animation and video to engage learners, with the aim of embedding high-level skills and knowledge for best practice facility management.   

IMC has leveraged its expertise from working with clients such as National Rugby League, the Department of Health and Human Services, BMW, Mercedes Benz and Audi to craft unique and conversational learning experiences.

Amanda Kane, Organics Manager at the NSW EPA, says Let’s Chat Compost aims to draw attention to the key processes most relevant to processors, regulators, local government, consultants and waste collection operators.

“Let’s Chat Compost will be a tool to reinforce learning and act as a reminder for what’s happening inside a compost pile that might be causing an odour, or why it’s important to manage contamination and the importance of pasteurisation,” Amanda says.

“IMC’s concept was developed in Germany and designed to look as much like a phone chat as possible. It was in recognition of the platforms we use in everyday life.”

She says that developing smartphone nuggets is an exercise in communicating the most important content in an engaging way.

“The main goal of the nuggets is to get people to take up the course, but also as a reminder for those that have completed the course,” Amanda says.

The app can send notifications to those who have completed the course, encouraging them to share the modules with their colleagues or revisit aspects of their learning.

Amanda adds that companies could adapt the program to suit their organisational tone and include additional relevant occupational health and safety and company information.

“The result is not only contributing to the production of a quality product, but upskilling the industry and minimising the environmental impact of one’s operations.

“It’s critical that processors are operating within the conditions of their license, and that if any issues do arise, they know how to respond and communicate with the EPA and advise us what’s happening.”

She says that the smartphone nuggets are aimed to be accessible on multiple devices and link back to course content.

The modules also include expert tips from industry leaders such as SOILCO and Australian Native Landscapes (ANL).

“We wanted to have industry voices to communicate those messages. All of the course content was filmed at sites around NSW using various technologies,” Amanda says.

“These include ANL’s open windrow or the in-tunnel systems that JR Richards & Sons have up at Grafton and then using team members at all levels to communicate the message, including EPA regulatory staff as well.

“We have had 300 people sign up, and the overall feedback is that people are finding it to be a rewarding learning experience.”

EVA Environmental Director Geraldine Busby, who also worked on the initial training course, oversaw the development of smartphone nuggets.

Carmen Locke, Instructional Designer, IMC AG, says conversational learning allows learners to make decisions while being actively immersed in a one-on-one learning scenario. This increases their ability to retain content, understand concepts and develop new skills and behaviours.

To use Let’s Chat Compost click here.

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