Bingo Industries to acquire Dial A Dump Industries

Bingo Industries has announced it will acquire fully integrated NSW waste and recycling business Dial A Dump Industries for $577.5 million.

It comes as Bingo Industries released its full-year results (more to come on this). According to an ASX statement, consideration for the acquisition will comprise $377.5 million in cash and $200 million in Bingo shares to be issued to vendors of Dial A Dump Industries Group (DADI Group) after the acquisition is completed.

The acquisition will be funded by an underwritten 1 for 2.48 $425 million pro-rata accelerated non-renounceable entitlement offer and $200 million scrip consideration to DADI vendors, priced at $2.54 per new ordinary share.

DADI Group generated financial year 2018 revenue of $198.2 million and earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation of $51.6 million.

Ian Malouf, the largest vendor of DADI will join the Bingo board after the acquisition is completed with a shareholding of up to 12 per cent post completion of the entitlement offer and acquisition.

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The acquisition includes its post-collection assets, including Genesis Waste Facility at Eastern Creek, a recycling and landfill asset with approved capacity of up to two million tonnes per annum and remaining useful landfill life of about 15 years.

The ASX statement said DADI has strong future growth opportunities through exposure to favourable NSW infrastructure markets and structural shifts towards recycling.

It said there would be compelling future growth opportunities, including the opportunity to develop a Recycling Ecology Park in Eastern Creek aligned with Bingo’s strategy of further diversifying into putrescible, commercial and industrial and municipal solid waste and waste post collections.

The statement said it also provides economic benefits through volume growth and internalisation of 100 per cent of Bingo’s non-putrescible building and demolition and commercial and industrial waste, with significant landfill capacity for external customers and broader coverage of revenue from the excavation and demolition phases of the construction process.

CEO Daniel Tartak has committed to invest a further $72 million to take up 100 per cent of his entitlements, while Tony Tartak, the founder of Bingo and Mark Tartak have separately committed to invest a further $9 million each.

CEO Daniel Tartak said the DADI site at Eastern Creek provides Bingo with the opportunity to transform waste recovery and recycling in greater Sydney through the development of a Recycling Ecology Park.

“The Recycling Ecology Park, once completed, will considerably broaden our range of processed end products as we work towards building a circular economy. By seeking alternative waste solutions, we can enhance recovery rates, consistent with Bingo’s strategic intent of diverting waste from landfill through recycling led solutions,” he said.

Dial A Dump founder Ian Malouf said the company has a lot of respect for Bingo and how they have built their business.

“Bringing together these two Australian companies makes complete sense. I fully support Daniel Tartak the CEO and Bingo’s growth strategy, particularly the vision of a master site at Eastern Creek that can process all waste types. With the infrastructure program in NSW and the new waste levy in Queensland, the market is only going to grow and I’m excited to be on board for the journey,” he said.

Bingo expects to deliver run-rate synergies of $15 million per annum to be realised over two years, from internalisation of waste volumes, operational efficiencies and rationalisation of overheads.

The acquisition remains subject to customary closing conditions including ACCC informal merger clearance.

Byron Bay Bioenergy calls for businesses to help supply feedstock

Byron Shire Council, NSW, has opened an expression of interest for the supply of commercial organic waste to the proposed Bioenergy Plant in Byron Bay.

The technology involved in the waste to energy plant is able to receive more than what the Byron Shire Council already collects, meaning more can be contributed from additional sources.

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Byron Shire Mayor Simon Richardson said they’re putting out the call to local business and industry to supply commercial food waste and commercial fats, oils and greases as feedstock for the bioenergy plant.

“This is a huge win for our community because it will enable businesses to divert large quantities of commercial food waste from landfill to a Council owned and operated 400-kilowatt bioenergy plant to power our Sewage Treatment Plants,” Cr Richardson said.

“It is the start of us creating our own clean and renewable energy here in the Byron Shire and I strongly encourage our business community to get on board this ground-breaking initiative.

“Our intention from the start was to create a local and scalable bioenergy solution and it is very exciting to be at the stage where we are here inviting the business community to the table,” he said.

It is proposed that the new Bioenergy plant will be located at the Byron Sewer Treatment Plant sit on Wallum Road, Byron Bay.

The Bioenergy plant will help Council reach its zero emissions target by 2025 and make some serious reductions to our carbon footprint,” Cr Richardson said.

It is expected the plant will be commissioned and operational by December 2020.

Turning coffee grounds into coffee cups

Coffee grounds could be used to create biodegradable plastic coffee cups thanks to new research from Macquarie University.

The process converts the spent coffee grounds into a lactic acid which is then turned into a plastic, however the method is still being refined by researcher Dominik Kopp.

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Because 50 per cent of coffee grounds are made up of sugars, they can be converted into bio-based chemicals.

The method was inspired by a metabolic pathway that is thought to exist in an evolutionary ancient organism, which lived in hot and extremely acidic environments.

“Australians consume six billion cups of coffee every year, and the coffee grounds used to make these coffees are used only once and then discarded,” says Mr Kopp.

“In Sydney alone, over 920 cafes and coffee shops produced nearly 3,000 tonnes of waste coffee grounds every year.

“Ninety-three per cent of this waste ends up in landfill, where it produces greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming.”

Mr Kopp sources the coffee grounds from one of the shops on Macquarie’s campus and took them back to the lab.

“We assembled a synthetic pathway to convert the most abundant sugar in the coffee grounds, mannose, into lactic acid,” he says.

“Lactic acid can be used in the production of biodegradable plastics, offering a more sustainable and environmentally-friendly alternative to fossil fuel-derived plastics.

“You could use such plastics to make anything from plastic coffee cups to yoghurt containers to compost bags to sutures in medicine.”

His next step will be to further refine the conversion pathway and improve the yield of lactic acid.

“I think my project is one of many interesting approaches on how to use synthetic biology in a responsible manner for the development of a more sustainable and greener industry that doesn’t rely on crude oil,” says Dominik.

“The simple idea that we are converting waste into a valuable and sustainable product is extremely exciting!”

Planet Ark provide councils packaging recycling label webinars

Planet Ark is increasing its efforts to educate Australians about Australasia Recycling Labels, including councils and educators.

In partnership with the Australian Packaging Covenant Organisation (APCO), the Australasian Recycling Label has entered into a new phase which will allow more companies to adopt it. Organisations such as Australia Post, Blackmores, Nestlé, Unilever and Woolworths have already pledged their commitment to the label.

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It has been designed to be easy to understand and show what needs to be done with each piece of packaging to dispose of it in the best way.

Because councils play an important part in the recycling process and are the source of the evidence base used by the label, Planet Ark is hosting a series of free webinars in the coming weeks.

Council and waste industry staff members that are interested can sign up by clicking here.

Webinars are planned for the following dates:

  • August 28 – 11am AEST
  • September 4 – 11am AEST
  • September 12 – 1pm AEST
  • September 20 – 1pm AEST

City of Ballarat signs waste to energy agreement with MRCB

A due diligence study can now be undertaken for the construction of a $300 million municipal waste to energy plant in the Ballarat West Employment Zone.

It comes as a result of the City of Ballarat signing a Waste to Energy Heads of Agreement with the Malaysian Resources Corporation Berhad (MRCB).

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The City of Ballarat has been planning for a waste to energy facility for five years, which would divert 60 per cent of the city’s waste into an energy source for industries and reduce the current regional landfill’s environmental impacts.

Currently, 30,000 tonnes of waste are deposited in the landfill each year, with waste disposal costing more than $18 million per year.

It is estimated that the plant would increase the size of Ballarat’s economy by $202 million through building and flow on effects, with about 420 jobs created during construction and 120 ongoing jobs.

MRCB’s technology partner, Babcock and Wilcox Volund, built its first waste to energy plant in 1931 and has gone on to build more in the United States, China, Sweden, Ireland, Denmark, Malaysia and Korea.

City of Ballarat Mayor Cr Samantha McIntosh said the Western region was already a leader in renewable energy production, particularly wind energy, but this announcement would further enhance its standing.

“Signing this Heads of Agreement means we are one significant step closer to a Waste to Energy plant in Ballarat that would be a regional solution to our waste reduction issues while providing an affordable and reliable energy source,” Cr McIntosh said.

“It would also be a driving force in attracting industries and employment to BWEZ by delivering a uniquely competitive advantage.”

“We will also maintain our commitment to minimising waste through continual education about re-use and recycling.”

MRCB’s Group Managing Director Imran Salim arrived from Kuala Lumpur to witness the Heads of Agreement signing by Ravi Krishnan, CEO of MRCB International.

“MRCB is delighted to be in Ballarat and looks forward to working closely with the City of Ballarat and the wider community on providing a world class facility,” Mr Salim said.

New solar powered composter for Canberra community

A new solar powered composter has been unveiled at the Canberra Environment Centre to launch the Canberra Community Composting project.

The composter was purchased by the centre after it received a $24,200 grant from the ACT Government’s Community Zero-Emissions Grants program.

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Food scraps can be dropped off at the Environment Centre to be processed by the new machine, nicknamed The Hungry Composter. The project aims to support members of the community who feel as if they don’t have the time, space or knowledge to compost at home.

The Hungry Composter is able to process 100 litres of mixed waste a day, including paper, cardboard, food scraps and green waste. It is solar power, odourless, continuous-feed system that processes food scraps into ready-to-use compost within 10-14 days.

Community members need to register with the Environment Centre before disposing of their waste for composting.

ACT Government Sustainability Programs Senior Manager, Ros Malouf said it was a fantastic example of a community group working with the ACT government to implement a project which will have significant benefits for both residents and the environment.

“In addition to generating nutrient rich soil, composting is a great way to reduce emissions. Organic material sent to landfill produces methane, a greenhouse gas that is approximately 25 times more potent than carbon dioxide.”

More than $1.1M invested in Victoria’s recycling sector

Three recycling companies are set to share more than $1.1 million from the Victorian Government to fast track upgrade projects.

The Recycling Industry Transition Support fund is designed to boost the sector’s capacity to capture and reprocess plastics, paper and cardboard waste to a commercial grade acceptable to local and international markets.

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Australian Paper Recovery at Dandenong South will receive $475,000 as part of the company’s $1.2 million equipment upgrade, which includes new waste paper sorting and compaction equipment.

Polymer Processors, Braeside will receive a $500,000 grant as part of a $3.2 million upgrade, which will allow the company to purchase new plastic washing equipment and accept a wider range of plastics.

The grant will also support an upgrade of waste water treatment and increase processing capacity of plastics by 800 kilograms per hour.

Tambo Waste in Bairnsdale will receive a $130,000 grant to upgrade its equipment and lift its annual production by 800 tonnes and to enable future expansion by another 5000 tonnes a year.

The project will aim to create jobs, reduce contamination in processed plastic, paper and cardboard, and lift material to a commercially acceptable grade for local and international markets.

The funding is part of a $13 million package to help councils and the recycling sector.

Victorian Environment Minister Lily D’Ambrosio said the government is helping Victoria’s recycling sector adjust to changes in world recycling markets.

“These grants will help reprocess more than 48,000 tonnes of plastic, paper and cardboard each year and create 19 jobs in Melbourne and Gippsland,” she said.

New appointments for VIC Waste and Resource Recovery Groups

The Victorian Government has appointed 25 directors to the state’s seven Waste and Resource Recovery Groups.

The directors, including nine reappointments, commenced their roles on 1 August.

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They bring a broad range of experience to their roles with diverse backgrounds including energy, engineering, resource efficiency, local government, infrastructure development, sustainability, waste management and environmental policy.

The appointees will aim to ensure the Groups have the skills and experience needed to deliver a safe, resilient and efficient recycling system.

Waste and Resource Recovery Groups are a part of the state government’s Recycling Industry Strategic Plan with local councils across Victoria.

Appointees have increased board representation of women, people with disabilities and Victorians from culturally or linguistically diverse backgrounds.

More than $100 million has been invested by the state government over the last four years to improve the Victoria’s waste and resource recovery system.

Victorian Environment Minister Lily D’Ambrosio congratulated the appointees and said she looks forward to working with them to strengthen the state’s waste and recycling sector.

“We’re making sure Victoria is equipped with the people and resources it needs to reduce waste and costs to households,” she said.

A list of the appointments and directors can be found here.

Deakin researchers could recycle jeans into joints

Advanced textile recycling methods could see denim jeans transformed into artificial cartilage for joint reconstruction.

Deakin University researchers Dr Nolene Byrne and PhD candidate Beini Zeng have discovered how to dissolve denim and turn them into an aerogel that can be used for cartilage biosculpting, water filtration and used as a separator in advanced battery technology.

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Dr Byrne said the denim recycling technique would also help contribute to the fight against textile waste.

“Textile waste is a global challenge with significant environmental implications, and we’ve been working for more than four years to address this problem with a viable textile recycling solution,” she said.

“With population growth and the development of third world countries combined with today’s rapid fashion cycles, textile waste is always increasing, leading to millions of tonnes of clothes and other textiles being burnt or dumped in landfill.”

Dr Byrne said Deakin’s Institute for Frontier Materials team used an “upcycling” approach to get around cost-effectiveness issues.

“One of the main drawbacks of textile recycling efforts is that any advanced technique requires the use of chemicals, which can then make the procedure less cost-effective,” she said.

“We use environmentally-friendly chemicals, and by upcycling our approach to create a more advanced material we can address the limitations affecting other less cost-effective methods.

“We are now entering pilot-scale trials and look to be at commercial scale within 3 to 5 years with industry support.”

Dr Nolene Byrne (left) and PhD candidate Beini Zeng (right)

She said the process worked because denim was made from cotton, a natural polymer comprised of cellulose.

“Cellulose is a versatile renewable material, so we can use liquid solvents on waste denim to allow it to be dissolved and regenerated into an aerogel, or a variety of different forms,” she said.

“Aerogels are a class of advanced materials with very low density, sometimes referred to as ‘frozen smoke’ or ‘solid smoke’, and because of this low density they make excellent materials for bioscaffolding, absorption or filtration.

“When we reformed the cellulose, we got something we didn’t expect – an aerogel with a unique porous structure and nanoscopic tunnels running through the sample.”

Dr Byrne said she believed the sticky nature of the denim cellulose solution was likely responsible for the unique aerogel structure that resulted, something ideally suited for use as synthetic cartilage.

“That’s exactly what cartilage looks like – you can’t 3D print that material – and now we can shape and tune the aerogel to manipulate the size and distribution of the tunnels to make the ideal shape,” she said.

Isuzu to showcase new heavy lifter at AWRE

Isuzu Australia (IAL) is exhibiting its latest waste management heavy lifter at the Australasian Waste & Recycling Expo (AWRE), which will be held at the International Convention Centre in Sydney, 29-30 August 2018.

According to IAL, AWRE brings together the “latest thinking around waste and recycling, and the products that are employed in the waste collection, processing recovery and recycling processes”.

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IAL will present a truck developed by waste equipment company, Superior-PAK, in the AWRESOME product showcase.

The FVY, rated at 24,000kg gross vehicle mass and 36,000kg gross combination mass, is reportedly an ideal platform for waste applications with its “brawny” turbo-charged and intercooled diesel engine rated at 221 kw at 2,400 RPM and 981 nM at 1,450 RPM. The emission control system comprises cooled EGR with Exhaust Diesel Particulate Diffuser and is ADR 80/03 (Euro V) and EEV compliant.

“Offsetting the harsh stop-start nature of waste applications is the Allison 3500 automatic transmission and Hendrickson HAS460 rear airbag suspension both contributing to smooth and predictable operational behaviour,” IAL said in a statement.

“In addition to the Allison auto and Hendrickson rear airbag suspension, the Isuzu FVY benefits from industry-standard components, such as Meritor axles with cross-locks, Meritor ‘Q-Plus brakes with ABS, and in the cab, the ISRI 6860 air-suspended seat.”

IAL National Truck Sales Manager, Les Spaltman said Isuzu was pleased to be supporting AWRE in 2018.

“One key to Isuzu’s success lies in developing reliable and efficient trucks that can be adapted to broad range of applications and specifications including waste and recycling, and events like this help get the product in front of the right people.

“We’re continually striving to improve our offering and partnering and mixing with like-minded business and industry leaders ensures that we are exposed to the latest thinking and ideas.

“Isuzu and AWRE go back a long way and we want to continue to offer our services and support in their endeavours to facilitate better waste and recycling management,” he said.