NSW crackdown targets illegal waste transporters

The NSW EPA has partnered with police, the ACT Government and local councils to target rogue operators supplying waste soil from construction sites advertised as clean fill to property owners.

Compliance and road side checks were part of the crackdown to ensure fill going to a site had the appropriate council approval to accept it.

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By targeting rogue operators during transport, the NSW EPA aims to stop contaminated and non-compliant materials being illegally dumped or passed off as clean fill to innocent land owners.

Accepting large amounts of fill can create potential dust issues and pollute waterways.

NSW EPA Senior Officer Janine Goodwin said in some of the worst cases, operators are providing unsuspecting residents with soil cheaply or for free that is contaminated with construction and demolition waste, heavy metals or even asbestos.

“Councils require landholders to apply for development approval to bring larger volumes of fill onto private property. If a property is used to accept this material without proper council approval, both the landholder, the owner of the waste and the transport contractor may be fined and the landholder may discover they have to pay to have the material removed,” Ms Goodwin said.

“We have been checking things like documentation to make sure the waste is correctly classified and going to a site that has consent to accept it.”

ACT EPA’s Narelle Sargent said waste being transported between the ACT and NSW needs approval.

“Transporters and builders are on notice that the illegal transport and disposal of waste will not be tolerated in the ACT region, and large penalties apply,” Ms Sargent said.

Canberra’s sustainability strategy tackles waste

A new sustainability strategy for Canberra has been released that set targets for waste reduction, increased recycling and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions.

It is part of Canberra’s City Renewal Authority’s goal to become a world class sustainable capital city as part of its built environment and design.

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Targets identified in the strategy for 2025 include waste and recycling management plans aim to target 95 per cent of construction resource recovery and increasing the onsite capture and reuse of organics, recyclables and bulky waste by 20 per cent over the 2015 level.

To hit these targets, the strategy plans to deliver exemplars of waste resource recovery in construction and operation phases of Canberran projects.

The City Renewal Authority’s sustainability program uses sustainability policies from across the ACT Government to form the strategy for the City Renewal Precinct.

City Renewal Authority CEO Malcolm Snow said Canberrans have a high expectation that their city be environmentally, socially and economically sustainable.

“We want a city that will still support future generations, so we need to create a city now where sustainable living is a part of everyday life. This responds to the community’s expectation for government leadership on sustainable development and access to green space,” Mr Snow said.

“Social and environmental sustainability are vital elements of our program as we implement the design-led and people-focused renewal of our city precinct.

“We will make Canberra an even more liveable city by reducing its environmental footprint and setting a high standard of social sustainability,” he said.

Mr Snow said the Authority has set these targets to influence outcomes across the precinct as new development proposals are submitted.

“Achieving these outcomes will require collective urban leadership from government, the community and the private sector. It is in all our interests that the city grows in a way that improves the lives of current and future generations,” he said.

“We can’t do this alone and we look forward to working with all stakeholders to help make the City Renewal Precinct an even better place for people to work, live and visit.”

ACT Government explores liquid fuel facility

The ACT Government has prepared a draft terms of reference and appointed a panel for an independent inquiry into a proposed facility which would see waste plastic converted into liquid fuel.

According to the draft terms of reference, the proposed facility, located in the suburb of Hume, aims to convert landfill destined end of life plastics into road ready diesel, gasoline, and gas.

The terms of reference indicated that the proposed facility plans to process waste plastic by heating the plastic waste and separating the components through a series of chambers, extracting diesel, fuel and LPG.

The proponent plans to build the development in four stages, with the final stage intended to be completed in January 2018.

“Work has taken place over the last couple of weeks to prepare comprehensive draft terms of reference to guide the inquiry into the Hume proposal,” Dorte Ekelund, Director-General, Environment, Planning and Sustainable Development said.

“These cover aspects such as reviewing the proposed technology, identifying and assessing risks, commenting on the suitability of the proposed site and assessing the methodologies of the reports commissioned by Foy Group in relation to public health matters.”

Ms Ekelund said the terms of reference will be finalised in conjunction with the appointed panel.

“The Hume facility proposes new technology so it’s critical a thorough assessment is undertaken of the proposal to see if there are any potential issues, particularly around public health and the environment.”

Ms Ekelund said the panel will start work next month with a report finalised by the end of April 2017 for the government to consider.

 

ACT’s smart program boosts business recycling

From training for cleaners to awards recognition, the ACT Government’s Actsmart Business Recycling program is making 
a big impact on the territory’s sustainability performance. Organisations from across Australia are now being invited to use Actsmart’s tools to improve their recycling rates.

Read moreACT’s smart program boosts business recycling

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