Ecocycle unveils new branding

Ecocycle, formerly CMA Ecocycle, has updated its branding to highlight different business units, which will include Ecobatt and Ecoe-waste.

Ecocycle specialises in recycling batteries, lighting and e-waste, as well as mercury-containing waste from the dental, medical, mining, gas, and petro-chemical industries.

Ecocycle Business Development Manager Daryl Moyle said the revamp comes as the company continues to invest in modern equipment and technology.

“There are so many different products that can be recycled in the sector today, however we focus on specific products and niche markets rather than being a general waste company,” Mr Moyle said.

“The idea is to help customers distinguish our different services, so having a specific brand like Ecobatt will help customers identify us as a battery recycler.”

Mr Moyle said Ecocycle were investing in a battery recycling plant that will be the first of its kind in Australia.

“It will bring new solutions to the world of recycling in a big way,” Mr Moyle said.

“The company is also investing in new downstream sorting machinery for e-waste that will transform sorting processes, as well as safety equipment specifically designed for dealing with lithium ion batteries.”

Related stories:

CMA Ecocycle’s electric vehicle fire suppressant system

CMA Ecocycle is taking its role as an e-waste recycler a step further with what is an Australia-first solution to contain and control electric vehicle fires. 

Read moreCMA Ecocycle’s electric vehicle fire suppressant system

Five benefits of a workplace battery recycling program

With less than 10 per cent of batteries sold in Australia each year recycled, e-waste recyclers CMA Ecocycle are seeking to reshape the landscape dramatically.

The benefits of recycling batteries go beyond environmental, with a number of financial benefits that can also be gained from doing so. CMA Ecocycle below highlight five of the benefits that come with battery recycling.

  1. Reduced landfill costs

The greater the volume of waste sent for recycling, the lower the landfill costs a business needs to pay. Victoria’s ban on e-waste to landfill will also encourage more businesses to think twice about sending their batteries to landfill as if the policy is properly policed, businesses could face hefty fines for doing the wrong thing.

  1. A valued commodity

Lead acid is currently in demand, with lead, acid and plastic all easily and cheaply recycled. At present, most other types of batteries incur a net cost but this could change with more efficient collection programs and advances in recycling technology.

  1. Reduced future costs

Batteries contain valuable materials such as cobalt, manganese and lithium – finite resources subject to the laws of supply and demand. With demand soaring, dumping batteries removes these materials from the supply side of the equation while recycling them keeps them in circulation. Increasing the supply means lowering resource prices that will flow through to lower new battery prices.

  1. Reduced recruitment and training costs

Running visible recycling programs is one way of standing out from the crowd and good corporate social responsibility may help retain staff. Companies that rank poorly on environmental performance may face higher staff turnover and this will only lead to higher recruitment and training costs.

  1. Simplicity

Reaping the many financial benefits of battery recycling is easier than you might think.

CMA Ecocycle provides battery collection and recycling solutions ranging from two litre collection buckets up to the truckload.

To get started, all you need to do is call CMA Ecocycle on 1300 32 62 92, or head to their website and fill in a form.

Bucking the trend: CMA Ecocycle

CMA Ecocycle has spent the past 18 months planning a first-of-its-kind battery recycling plant set to become a critical part of Victoria’s e-waste recycling infrastructure network. 

Read moreBucking the trend: CMA Ecocycle

CMA Ecocycle’s battery recycling program

More than 90 per cent of dead batteries, which equates to hundreds of thousands a year, are ending up in landfill, according to CMA Ecocycle. The material only adds to Australia’s waste problem and increases the risk of toxic chemicals polluting the environment. It’s also a waste of valuable and reusable resources.

CMA Ecocycle recycles all types of batteries, including lead acid, alkaline batteries, AA, AAA, C&D, nickel cadmium, nickel metal hydride and lithium ion and button cell. The organisation is able to safely recover mercury, lead, silver, nickel, cadmium, steel and plastic.

For businesses generating larger volumes of battery waste, including enough to fill a two-litre container each year, the organisation offers a tailor-made solution to suit the battery waste stream. For smaller cell-type and button batteries, this may include a large collection bucket. Other options are available as required for larger batteries such as car batteries.

In the case of battery collection buckets, a single charge covers delivery, pickup and recycling costs. Bins are charged according to bin capacity (additional charges may apply outside metropolitan area), minus any payment for the scrap value of the batteries. In the case of car batteries, businesses may end up with cash in hand.

CMA Ecocycle delivers the empty collection buckets or bins to a business’ door, ready to start collecting their batteries for recycling. Once the buckets or bins are full, CMA Ecocycle can be called to arrange pickup.

cmaecocycle.net

CMA Ecocycle Partners with Papua New Guinea recycling plant

Waste trucks transporting waste

Australian recycler of mercury-containing waste CMA Ecocycle has partnered with Papua New Guinean environmental services company Total Waste Management (TWM) to reduce a history of international transfers of toxic waste.

The Australian company plans to take mercury-containing waste collected by TWM, primarily fluorescent lighting, and process it in its Melbourne facilities.

CMA Ecocycle said the tendency in the past was for industrialised countries to ship waste to less developed nations where it is either dumped, often illegally or manually broken down for recycling with no regard given to the health and safety of workers.

They said their long-term plan was to install a lighting recycling plant in Port Moresby, PNG, and provide training at the TWM operated facility.

Daryl Moyle, Business Development Manager at CMA Ecocycle, said managing mercury waste was a growing priority in the Pacific Islands region, and PNG was just the first step in CMA Ecocycle’s plans for the region.

“With the support of TWM we hope to increase awareness of this toxic substance, its impact on the environment and how we can all protect these often small and vulnerable islands by implementing simple but important recycling solutions,” Mr Moyle said.

In 2015, a sub-regional workshop on the Minamata Convention, aimed at supporting Pacific Islands in the early ratification and implementation of the convention, was held in Samoa.

Topics discussed at the workshop included the levels of mercury in Pacific fish, and the need for adequate institutional and border controls to manage mercury.

The PNG government is also active in running awareness campaigns about mercury pollution and the Minamata Convention at home, and taking a leading role on the issue in the Pacific region.