Ecocycle: battery revamp

Daryl Moyle, Ecocycle Business Development Manager, speaks with Waste Management Review about the company’s battery recycling capabilities and recent rebrand.    

Less than three per cent of all batteries purchased in Australia are recycled, with the rest ending up in landfill. According to Sustainability Victoria, this means over 14,000 tonnes of batteries are destined for landfill each year.

Australia’s performance in this space is poor, with the UK recovering just under 30 per cent and Switzerland recovering 72 per cent. Things are potentially looking up however, with a recent meeting of environment ministers endorsing the work of the Battery Stewardship Council to design a product stewardship scheme.

Battery recycling has many benefits, ranging from keeping harmful materials out of the environment, recovering non-renewable resources and ensuring used batteries don’t start fires.

Australasian mercury recovery and recycling company Ecocycle, formerly CMA Ecocycle, have recently updated their branding to highlight different business divisions, such as Ecobatt.

Daryl Moyle, Ecocycle Business Development Manager, says the revamp comes at a time when the company is continuing to invest in modern equipment and technology, specifically in the sphere of batteries.

“There are so many different products that can be recycled in the sector today, however we focus on specific products and niche markets rather than being a general waste company,” Daryl says.

“The idea is to help customers distinguish our different services, so having a specific brand like Ecobatt will help customers identify us as a battery recycler.”

According to Daryl, the Ecobatt unit is already bringing specific battery safety products to market to minimise environmental risk, including electric vehicle recovery containers to address potential battery fires.

Daryl says batteries are made up of metals, chemicals and other materials that may not seem reusable, however most elements found in batteries can, in fact, be recycled.

Ecocycle recycles all type of batteries to recover metals like lead, cadmium, nickel, steel, zinc, mercury, cobalt, lithium, silver and manganese.

“The more complex the battery chemistry gets, the more difficult it is to extract materials and the more technical the process has to be,” Daryl says.

“We’ve taken a well-researched, systematic approach to the problem, and partnered with world-leading companies to roll out proven technology to manage each step of the battery recycling process – collection, sorting and processing.”

The majority of batteries on the Australian market are alkaline batteries, such as non-rechargeable AA and AAA batteries, and therefore make up the majority of the recyclable battery waste stream. But forecasts reveal that lithium-ion batteries will make up a huge volume in years to come.

“Alkaline batteries, including paper, steel, zinc and manganese, can be easily recycled because the battery chemistry is simple to work with, however lithium ion presents a far more complex recycling problem,” Daryl says.

“Lead-acid batteries, commonly used as car batteries, also have high recycling rates of around 95 per cent. Lead acid batteries are a success story in the recycling world.”

“Ecocycle is constructing a new high-tech battery sorting plant and this will be the first of its kind in Australia and operational before the end of the year.”

The sorting plant will have the capacity to process more than 5000 tonnes of batteries each year, with the ability to identify more than 3000 battery types by chemistry, brand, size and shape.

Daryl says the facility will combine pre-sorting, automated and manual sorting and separate all types of batteries into their respective streams, whether it be alkaline and zinc, which make up the greatest proportion of battery waste, or lead acid, nickel cadmium, nickel metal hydride, lithium and button cell batteries.

Despite recent actions, Daryl says a lot of work still needs to be done to develop new technology to make the battery recycling process successful.

“In a world that’s increasingly reliant on batteries, recycling will become an ever-increasing source of raw materials for new batteries production,” Daryl says.

“As a specialist battery recycler, the team at Ecocycle will continue to track new developments in this space.”

Related stories: 

Ecocycle unveils new branding

Ecocycle, formerly CMA Ecocycle, has updated its branding to highlight different business units, which will include Ecobatt and Ecoe-waste.

Ecocycle specialises in recycling batteries, lighting and e-waste, as well as mercury-containing waste from the dental, medical, mining, gas, and petro-chemical industries.

Ecocycle Business Development Manager Daryl Moyle said the revamp comes as the company continues to invest in modern equipment and technology.

“There are so many different products that can be recycled in the sector today, however we focus on specific products and niche markets rather than being a general waste company,” Mr Moyle said.

“The idea is to help customers distinguish our different services, so having a specific brand like Ecobatt will help customers identify us as a battery recycler.”

Mr Moyle said Ecocycle were investing in a battery recycling plant that will be the first of its kind in Australia.

“It will bring new solutions to the world of recycling in a big way,” Mr Moyle said.

“The company is also investing in new downstream sorting machinery for e-waste that will transform sorting processes, as well as safety equipment specifically designed for dealing with lithium ion batteries.”

Related stories:

CMA Ecocycle’s electric vehicle fire suppressant system

CMA Ecocycle is taking its role as an e-waste recycler a step further with what is an Australia-first solution to contain and control electric vehicle fires. 

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Five benefits of a workplace battery recycling program

With less than 10 per cent of batteries sold in Australia each year recycled, e-waste recyclers CMA Ecocycle are seeking to reshape the landscape dramatically.

The benefits of recycling batteries go beyond environmental, with a number of financial benefits that can also be gained from doing so. CMA Ecocycle below highlight five of the benefits that come with battery recycling.

  1. Reduced landfill costs

The greater the volume of waste sent for recycling, the lower the landfill costs a business needs to pay. Victoria’s ban on e-waste to landfill will also encourage more businesses to think twice about sending their batteries to landfill as if the policy is properly policed, businesses could face hefty fines for doing the wrong thing.

  1. A valued commodity

Lead acid is currently in demand, with lead, acid and plastic all easily and cheaply recycled. At present, most other types of batteries incur a net cost but this could change with more efficient collection programs and advances in recycling technology.

  1. Reduced future costs

Batteries contain valuable materials such as cobalt, manganese and lithium – finite resources subject to the laws of supply and demand. With demand soaring, dumping batteries removes these materials from the supply side of the equation while recycling them keeps them in circulation. Increasing the supply means lowering resource prices that will flow through to lower new battery prices.

  1. Reduced recruitment and training costs

Running visible recycling programs is one way of standing out from the crowd and good corporate social responsibility may help retain staff. Companies that rank poorly on environmental performance may face higher staff turnover and this will only lead to higher recruitment and training costs.

  1. Simplicity

Reaping the many financial benefits of battery recycling is easier than you might think.

CMA Ecocycle provides battery collection and recycling solutions ranging from two litre collection buckets up to the truckload.

To get started, all you need to do is call CMA Ecocycle on 1300 32 62 92, or head to their website and fill in a form.

Bucking the trend: CMA Ecocycle

CMA Ecocycle has spent the past 18 months planning a first-of-its-kind battery recycling plant set to become a critical part of Victoria’s e-waste recycling infrastructure network. 

Read moreBucking the trend: CMA Ecocycle

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