City of Bayside uses recycled asphalt

Dozens of streets in Melbourne’s City of Bayside are using recycled asphalt in the council’s latest maintenance resurfacing project.

To complete the project, Alex Fraser is repaving residential streets throughout the suburbs of Black Rock, Brighton, Highett and Hampton with high-quality asphalt products including volumes of recycled materials.

The project utilised more than 12,000 tonnes of sustainable asphalt, including Green Roads PolyPave – a high performance asphalt product containing recycled materials, comprising HDPE plastic, glass and RAP (Recycled Asphalt Pavement).

In doing so, Bayside has reduced waste to landfill by almost 4000 tonnes and carbon emissions by more than 21,606 kilograms.

Bayside roads have reused more than 100,000 two-litre milk bottles and 3.4 million glass bottles – equivalent to 9188 wheelie bins of waste glass and plastic, or the annual kerbside recycling for 350 households.

Bayside Mayor Cr Michael Heffernan said Bayside was ramping up its use of recycled materials in road construction as part of its pledge to greater environmental sustainability.

“We are committed to becoming more sustainable in every aspect of our operations and Green Roads are a great reflection of this commitment. Our residents can be confident that the recycling in their kerbside recycling bins can have a new life as the roads we drive and ride on,” he said.

Alex Fraser Managing Director Peter Murphy said this was a standout example of how a local community can play an active and important role in the state’s circular economy.

“Local governments’ role in recycling goes far beyond kerbside collection. Bayside City Council provides an excellent illustration of how local communities can maximise returns from resource recovery. By choosing to invest in recycled resources, Bayside has made significant commercial savings and reduced the carbon footprint of their project by around 65 per cent,” Mr Murphy said.

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The suburbs:
Black Rock
Brighton
Brighton East
Highett
Hampton
Beaumaris
Hampton Street

Geopolymer concrete laid in Sydney

Geopolymer concrete, made with industrial waste from coal-fired power stations and steel manufacturing, is being used for a green roads trial in the City of Sydney.

New concrete has been laid on a busy inner-city street, replacing a 30 metre section of roadway on Wyndham Street in Alexandria.

To test the concrete’s durability, the city has laid 15 metres of traditional concrete and 15 metres of the geopolymer concrete.

Nine sensors have been positioned to monitor and compare how the geopolymer concrete performs.

Sydney Lord Mayor Clover Moore said UNSW Sydney researchers and the CRC for Low Carbon Living will use trial results to create the first set of industry guidelines for geopolymer concrete.

“Local governments are responsible for maintaining local roads, so if we can purchase more environmentally sustainable materials, we can fight climate change and provide quality infrastructure for our community,” Ms Moore said.

“With 70 per cent of the concrete produced today going into pavements and footpaths, there’s great potential to further lower emissions from our operations.”

Made from fly ash and blast furnace slag, geopolymer generates 300 kilograms of CO2 per tonne of cement, compared to the 900 kilograms from traditional cement production.

“We’re continually working with concrete suppliers to reduce the amount of pollution and greenhouse gases emitted during the production of concrete for our local roads,” Ms Moore said.

“We already use sustainable green concrete for all our footway renewal works – which adds up to 25,000 metres squared per year.”

According to Ms Moore, the low CO2 concrete has the potential to reuse 400 million cubic tonnes of globally documented waste from the coal and steel industries.

Australian Iron and Steel Association and Ash Development Association Executive director and industry partner Craig Heidrich said the benefits of the trial will be far-reaching.

“Our collaboration with organisations such as the City of Sydney and the publication of the research findings will further demystify and promote the use of geopolymer concrete in construction,” Mr Heidrich said.

“It’s a fundamental tenet in business that you need to be constantly innovating and investing into new technologies. This trial will provide real examples of geopolymer concrete use that we can all use.”

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