ACT appoints new landfill gas manager

Green energy supplier LGI Limited will deliver gas infrastructure services to all ACT Government landfill sites, under a new 15 year contract with the state government.

Recycling and Waste Reduction Minister Chris Steel said the contract would see an estimated 34,900 megawatt hours captured each year, enough to power 5370 homes.

LGI Limited will deliver infrastructure upgrades at Mugga Lane landfill, including at least four power generators at Mugga Lane, each with the capacity to produce 1.06 megawatts of energy per hour.

Mr Steel said LGI Limited would also install an enclosed flare at the West Belconnen landfill to manage the safe destruction of gas onsite, as the volumes are not enough to provide a commercially viable quantity for sale.

According to Mr Steel, the ACT Government has been capturing landfill site methane emissions since 1997.

“Methane gas is generated when organic waste in landfill decomposes,” Mr Steel said.

“If properly managed, gas can be extracted and used to generate electricity, significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions at the same time.”

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Dust control and sweeping

Tailored dust control equipment can maintain workplace safety and minimise environmental impact, writes Tennant Company. 

Challenging environments like landfills, waste transfer stations and heavy vehicle workshops demand robust, built-to-last cleaning solutions.

With its extensive line-up of waste and heavy industry machinery, Tennant Company delivers on productivity, durability and workplace health and safety efficiencies.

As ever-more stringent protocols are implemented across Australia, designed to keep workforces safe and minimise environmental impact, demand has never been higher for total equipment solutions that can tick all the boxes and exceed productivity expectations.

Dust control and sweeping 

Our waste industry customers deploy Tennant’s Sentinel High-Performance Rider Sweeper for their waste transfer and landfill operations.

The extreme levels of dust and other pollutants are simply no match for the PM-10 certified Sentinel, also valued for its four-wheel power steering, tight turning circle and maneuverability to gain access between stockpiles, without impeding traffic.

The Tennant 800 Industrial Ride-On Sweeper is another popular unit used by customers in the waste industry.

It maximises cleaning productivity with its wide cleaning path, large (up to 907 kilogram) capacity hopper and operator-friendly features.

Capable of capturing dust to heavy debris, its heavy-duty T-beam steel construction and high-performance dust containment system make it ideal for Australia’s harsh environments.

Tennant offers a line of Compact Ride-On Sweepers including the 6100, 6200 and S20, also employed by waste enterprises of all sizes, as well as warehouse & logistics customers.

Designed for optimal maneuverability and single pass sweeping the available multi-stage dust control systems, can capture dust particles as small as 0.5 microns in size.

Also supplied to the waste industry is the S10 Walk-Behind Sweeper, which protects employees and facilities by tackling work bay dust capturing particles as small as three microns in size.

Simultaneous Sweeping and Scrubbing

Where large quantities of wet debris, dirt and oil needs to be cleaned up quickly, Tennant’s line-up of Sweeper-Scrubbers are infinitely up to the task.

The M-Series machines sweep and scrub simultaneously and are available with a range of power sources (battery, LPG or Diesel) depending on your facility requirement.

The M17 is an all-electric (fume free) Ride-On Sweeper-Scrubber equipped with DFS (dual force sweeping) technology and will maintaining indoor air quality with its a two-stage dust control system.

Cleaning time is extended with the largest available battery capacity in its class.

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Funding awarded for regional NSW landfills

The NSW Government has allocated $3.4 million to assist rural and regional landfill upgrades and closures in Western NSW, the Central West Murray and Northern Tablelands.

Environment Department Acting Director of Resource Recovery Amanda Kane said the Landfill Consolidation and Environmental Improvements Program aims to support environmental outcomes in regional councils, including closing down and consolidating landfills.

“The grants provide up to $200,000 to rural and regional councils who manage licensed and unlicensed landfills,” Ms Kane said.

“The funding supports projects that improve landfills to better protect the environment, such as installing signage, litter and security fencing or infrastructure to sort and recycle materials.”

According to Ms Kane, the grants also support the closure of landfills that have long term legacy issues, while ensuring residents still have access to services.

Projects include landfill closures in Lithgow, Parkes, Hilltops, Bellingen, Upper Hunter and Mid Coast, and improvement works in Bourke, Gilgandra, Walgett, Richmond Valley, Bland, Tenterfield, Leeton, Parkes, Tamworth and Dungog.

The program is delivered through a partnership between the Environmental Trust and the NSW EPA, as part of the state’s $802 million Waste Less, Recycle More initiative.

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Toowoomba waste transfer facility approved

Toowoomba Regional Council has approved the development application to construct a new waste transfer facility in Kleinton, to cater for growth in the Queensland region.

Waste Committee Chair Nancy Sommerfield said the transfer station will be built over the existing landfill site, which has reached capacity, and an adjacent parcel of land already owned by council.

“This state-of-the-art facility will be the fifth project delivered under the Waste Services Infrastructure Plan,” Ms Sommerfield said.

“The Kleinton waste transfer station will deliver environmental benefits to the area, and much greater opportunities for recycling.”

The Toowoomba Waste Services Infrastructure Plan details how service levels can be achieved to support resource recovery over landfill within the context of a growing population.

“As a region, our communities have embraced the need to reduce the amount of waste going into landfill, and this new facility will build on our region’s culture to reduce, reuse and recycle,” Ms Sommerfield said.

“The new facility will be a cleaner and tidier waste solution, with the waste stored on pavement and transported to landfill locations offsite.”

The existing landfill site will be rehabilitated as part of the project.

“These rehabilitation works include capping of the old landfill, and are a requirement under the existing Environment Authority and not part of the development application,” Ms Sommerfield said.

The new transfer station is expected to be complete by 2021.

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Position Partners: maximising landfill airspace

Position Partners’ Elizabeth Latham talks to Waste Management Review about machine guidance and maximising landfill productivity

When looking to expand the efficiency and productivity of a landfill site, one option is maximising airspace.

Position Partners’ Elizabeth Latham says to maximise airspace, landfill operators need to expand the amount of soil used for daily cover, along with the introduction of an alternate daily cover system.

Additionally, in order to get the best value from each cubic metre of airspace, she says operators need to optimise the compaction of waste.

“With the capability to be installed on a wide range of landfill plants, and a demonstrated track record, Carlson LandfillGrade — distributed in Australia by Position Partners — is the ideal system to implement at your landfill site to monitor waste compaction rates,” Elizabeth says.

“The two main benefits of Carlson LandillGrade, as identified at a specific Victorian landfill site, are instant operator feedback and the devices ability to extract airspace utilisation reports.”

According to Elizabeth, the site previously relied on periodic aerial surveys to provide data on airspace utilisation, before working with Position Partners to implement the Carlson management tool.

“Relying on periodic surveys meant more manual data manipulation was required, and resulted in significant time lags between data points, meaning it was more difficult to implement corrective actions,” she says.

“The ability to get real time data on waste compaction and airspace utilisation was one of the main features that drew this landfill site manager’s attention to the Carlson system.”

Elizabeth says the landfill manager also wanted a system that provided instant feedback to the compactor operators, so they could both operate to design, and know when optimal waste compaction had been achieved.

“The manager of the landfill site noted that prior to implementing the Carlson Landfill Grade, they had relied on the operator doing a certain number of passes to ensure the waste was compacted optimally, which is not a truly reliable way of managing compaction,” she adds.

 The Carlson system, implemented by Position Partners, is currently installed on two landfill compactors at the site, with plans to install a third unit on the dozer used for daily cover application further down the track.

“The manager at this landfill site has found that the Carlson system has been a seamless addition to the machines at the landfill,” Elizabeth says.

“The software tools have been integrated with the landfill site’s other systems without any issues or problems.”

Elizabeth says implementing LandfillGrade allows site managers to have access to better data, and deliver instant feedback to operators.

“This has resulted in some landfill site managers reporting an improvement in airspace utilisation efficiency of up to 10 per cent,” she says.

“Another benefit provided by the Carlson machine technology is that operators are able to get continuous feedback on where they are operating compared to the lift design, which reduces the need for rework and re-profiling, especially of the cell batters.”

Elizabeth says service and support are integral to any technology solution, along with capability and price.

“Having access to the local team of product experts is important to many of Position Partners’ customers during the decision-making process,” she says.

“The team at Position Partners is able to discuss how the system would benefit you on your site and assist you in understanding all the features of the Carlson system compared to other products that are available.”

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NWRIC meets with ministers

Ministers met with the waste and recycling industry in Melbourne to discuss recycling challenges, developing markets for recycled materials, new infrastructure capacity and how waste levies should be managed and reinvested into the sector.

Federal Waste Reduction Assistant Minister Trevor Evans and Victorian Environment Minister Lily D’Ambrosio meet with National Waste Recycling Industry Council (NWRIC) members and affiliated representatives on 6 August.

NWRIC Chairman Phil Richards said active collaboration between government and the waste and recycling industry was crucial to an effective sector.

“With recycling services under threat in Victoria, growing stockpiles across the country, exemptions revoked for the recovery of organics from mixed waste in NSW, now has never been a more important time for industry and government to work closely together,” Mr Richards said.

“Topics of discussion included the critical importance of long term infrastructure planning coordinated across all levels of government, as well as consistent, regular community education campaigns to rebuild community confidence in recycling.”

NWRIC Secretary Alex Serpo said NWRIC members suggested local procurement of recycled materials, and setting appropriate recycled content levels for packaging and civil construction, could revitalise domestic recycling.

Fuel manufacture and energy recovery projects were also discussed, with industry ready to deliver projects that recover embodied energy from unrecyclable materials, reduce greenhouse emissions and extend the life of landfills.

The role of waste levies in addressing current challenges was another topic of conversation.

“This included the need for states, territories and the Federal Government to develop a national levy pricing strategy through the Council of Australian Governments,” Mr Serpo said.

“This pricing strategy could prevent the inappropriate disposal and movement of waste, stop levy avoidance activities, and ensure the resource recovery industry is viable and competitive.”

NWRIC is calling on all state governments to be more transparent and accountable for the total amount of levies collected annually, what proportion of the levies are invested back into the waste and recycling sector and what outcomes are achieved.

Registrations launched for Waste Expo Australia

The future of waste management and resource recovery is high on the agenda at all levels of government as Australia’s largest and most comprehensive conference and exhibition, Waste Expo Australia launches registrations.

Hosting more than 120 brands and over 100 speakers across three conference stages, Waste Expo Australia will return to the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre on October 23 and 24.

Waste Expo Australia will offer free-to-attend conference content across the Waste and Wastewater Summits, attracting the largest gathering of waste management and resource professionals in Australia.

The Waste Summit Conference brought to you by Oceania Clean Energy Solutions will cover six targeted streams from resource recovery, waste-to-energy, collections, landfill and transfer stations, construction and demolition waste as well as commercial and industrial waste.

Key speakers will include Victoria’s Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change Lily D’Ambrosio, Victorian EPA CEO Cathy Wilkinson and Acting Executive Director for Waste Strategy and Policy at the NSW EPA Kar Mel Tang.

Other national and state-based bodies will be represented, along with case study presentations from local governments including Campaspe Shire Council, City of Holdfast Bay, Yarra City Council and Albury City Council.

Leading off day one of the Waste Summit, a panel will discuss the pressing issues surrounding Australia’s waste-to-energy (WtE) sector.

One of the panel members, Director of Enhar Consulting Demian Natakhan, will discuss the status of landfill solar generation and propose that the final resting place for municipal waste may be the beginning of new energy generation.

“Solar farming on former landfill sites offers a way to put otherwise unproductive land to a valuable use,” Mr Natakhan suggested.

“Where landfill gas is already collected in sufficient quantities to firepower generation, solar can be added onto existing grid infrastructure. In sites with lower landfill gas volumes, new solar generation with grid upgrades can unlock significant solar generation, avoiding the competition between solar farming and productive agricultural or industrial land.”

Confronting the challenges and opportunities in wastewater treatment will also be tackled at the Wastewater Summit brought to you by EnviroConcepts.

Waste Expo Australia Event Director Cory McCarrick said the event continues to grow with more speakers and suppliers on board this year than ever before.

“We have seen an increase in the total number of exhibitors this year to 120 and around 50 of these are exhibiting for the first time at Waste Expo Australia,” Mr McCarrick said.

Key exhibitors this year include Bost Group, Cleanaway, Caterpillar, HSR Southern Cross, Tricon Equipment, Applied Machinery and Hitachi.

“Add to this list our impressive line-up of speakers, there is no other waste event in Australia that gives you access to such thought-provoking content that address the major issues facing the industry coupled with the opportunities to be immersed among the key players and products for free,” Mr McCarrick said.

Waste Expo Australia is co-location with All-Energy Australia, Energy Efficiency Expo and ISSA Cleaning and Hygiene Expo — forming a significant showcase for the waste, recycling, wastewater, renewable energy, energy efficiency and cleaning industries.

Across the two days attendees will have access to industry speakers and suppliers across waste management, wastewater treatment, energy generation, energy efficiency and cleaning and hygiene.

Registration gives you access to all four events on Wednesday 23 and Thursday 24 October 2019.

To register visit www.wasteexpoaustralia.com.au

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SWRW seeks landfill alternative proposals

The South West Regional Waste Group (SWRW) in Western Australia is inviting businesses to suggest alternatives to landfill and has issued a memorandum to help clarify conditions.

According to a SWRW media statement, the group believes the timing is right to explore the broadening range of new and emerging technologies that turn waste into valuable by-products.

“The waste processing market is rapidly advancing as communities and businesses become more aware of the importance of waste management and its latent value,” the statement reads.

“New ideas and innovations in relation to waste management are constantly emerging, and it is vitally important that local governments and other decision-making bodies continue to liaise closely with industry in order to identify potential opportunities.”

The statement said securing feedback from the private sector on how companies can optimise current and future waste market conditions is an important first step.

“Information obtained now will inform future decision making as local governments seek to align their approach to waste management with the state government’s direction, which is moving toward the establishment of a circular waste economy,” the statement reads.

“To this end, the SWRW is asking companies in the local, national and international markets to submit proposals on how municipal waste may be used to benefit the broader South West region both now and into the future.  These ideas will be assessed by the group when considering long-term answers to regional waste management.”

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$7.5 million waste infrastructure contract awarded

A $7.5 million contract to deliver best practice infrastructure at Darwin’s Shoal Bay Waste Management Facility (SCWMF) has been awarded to local business DTA Contractors.

SBWMF is the only licensed landfill in the Darwin area and services both domestic and commercial customers.

SBWMF is currently comprised of a lined putrescible waste landfill, an inert landfill and recycling and mulch facilities.

According to City of Darwin CEO Scott Waters, DTA Contractors will build an additional land fill cell, with work expected to begin at the end of the July.

“The advantage of using local businesses for our program of works is they understand the environment in which we live and work,” Mr Waters said.

DTA Managing Director David Divilly said the company look forward to working collaboratively with the City of Darwin to deliver the project.

“Our extensive local experience ensures we understand the importance of utilising local businesses to deliver the highest possible standard for this important local infrastructure project,” Mr Divilly said.

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QLD awards resource recovery development grants

Stream one grant recipients of the Queensland Government’s $100 million Resource Recovery Industry Development Program (RRIDP) are estimated to divert 32,160 tonnes of waste from landfill each year.

Acting Infrastructure Minister Stirling Hinchliffe said the RRIDP aims to transform Queensland’s resource recovery industry by supporting projects that divert waste from landfill, reduce stockpiling and create jobs.

“Over 120 applications from across Queensland were received, which is a fantastic result and demonstrates the interest and capacity for the development of this industry,” Mr Hinchliffe said.

“For this round of stream one, projects were assessed on multiple criteria including contribution to development of industry, tonnes per dollar rates of diversion and projects that addressed waste that is historically hard to get rid of.”

Three streams of funding available under the program, with stream one providing dollar-for-dollar capital grants between $50,000 and $5 million for infrastructure projects that enhance or build new facilities, or for capital investments in new processing and technological capabilities.

Stream two provides incentives to attract or expand resource recovery operations, while stream three aims to grow Queensland’s resource recovery industry by attracting investments in new infrastructure.

The five recipients of RRIDP funding are:

— Astron Plastics: $2.5 million to divert 6,300 tonnes per annum of soft plastic waste.
— Cairns Regional Council: $295,400 to divert 18,735 tonnes per annum of construction and demolition waste.
— Elliott Agriculture: $325,000 to divert 2,256 tonnes per annum of organic waste.
— Townsville City Council: $60,000 to divert 572 tonnes per annum of general waste.
— Horne Group: $265,882 to divert 4,297 tonnes per annum of construction and demolition waste.

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