MobileMuster announces top local government recyclers

Over the past 12 months Hornsby Shire Council has collected 578 kilograms of mobile phones through its recycling centre and MobileMuster drop-off point.

The announcement was made at the Australian Local Government Association’s National General Assembly in Canberra.

MobileMuster Manager Spyro Kalos said the product stewardship scheme partners with nearly 400 councils around Australia and reaches 18 million residents.

“We are proud to partner with councils like Hornsby Shire Council, who represent a community driven to create a vibrant sustainable environment for themselves and future generations to live and work,” Mr Kalos said.

“The awards demonstrate the importance of industry and local government working together to tackle the growing problem of e-waste and making sure it is safely and securely recycled through an accredited program.”

Mr Kalos said it was important to ensure all communities have access to mobile phone recycling, with an estimated 25 million old mobile phones stockpiled in drawers across Australia.

“Local governments are often the first point of contact for residents and small businesses who want to recycle tricky items like their old mobile phones and accessories,” Mr Kalos said.

“In partnership with MobileMuster, councils can help Australians sustainably declutter their old phones, save precious resources and clean up the environment.”

MobileMuster’s Top Local Government Recyclers 2019:

National – Hornsby Shire Council

New South Wales – Hornsby Shire Council

Northern Territory – Darwin City Council

Queensland – Brisbane City Council

South Australia – City of Tea Tree Gully

Tasmania – Burnie City Council

Victoria – Moonee Valley City Council

Western Australia – City of Stirling

MobileMuster’s Top Local Government Recyclers Per Capita 2019:

National – Shire of Mount Marshall

New South Wales – Bellingen Shire Council

Northern Territory – Alice Springs Town Council

Queensland – Douglas Shire Council

South Australia – District Council of Mount Barker

Tasmania – Break O’Day Council

Victoria – Pyrenees Shire Council

Western Australia – Shire of Mount Marshall

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NWRIC appoint new CEO

The National Waste and Recycling Industry Council (NWRIC) has announced the appointment of a new CEO, effective 1 August.

Rose Read will take up the position with 20 years of experience in the waste, recycling and environmental sectors. She has lead commercial and not-for-profit organisations like the Australian Mobile Telecommunications Association’s MobileMuster and Clean Up Australia.

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She is currently the CEO of the product stewardship arm of MRI E-cycle Solutions and will transition out of the role are MRI to take the position of CEO of NWRIC.

“I am very excited to have the opportunity to work with Council members and State affiliates in addressing key national issues facing the industry,” Ms Read said.

“As a key enabler of the circular economy the recycling industry has much to contribute to Australia economically, environmentally and socially. I look forward to being part of NWRIC and collaborating with members and key stakeholders to create a more vibrant and sustainable waste and recycling industry,” she said.

MRI E-cycle Solutions Managing Director Will LeMessurier said Ms Read has played an important role in setting up MRI’s product stewardship arm over the past two years.

“She will continue to be involved in MRI on a part time basis over the next six months or so as we transition to our new structure. We wish her well in her new role and the continued positive influence she has over our industry,” he said.

The news follows the announcement of outgoing CEO Max Spedding’s retirement after 30 years of experience in the waste and recycling sector.

“Setting up the Council over the past two years has been a challenge but now we have all of the key national companies and state associations on board we are starting to see real and positive outcomes,” said Mr Spedding.

“With our current recycling problems and the urgent need for better infrastructure planning across Australia, Rose and her team have a busy time ahead. I wish them every success.”

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