National Symposium on the Beneficial Use of Recycled Organics

The 2nd National Symposium on the Beneficial Use of Recycled Organics will be held 20 – 21 June at the Brisbane Riverview Hotel.

Hosted by the Queensland Government and Griffith University, the symposium will see over 100 delegates from universities and government agencies, as well as environmental consultants, land managers and farmers.

To better understand the beneficial use of recycled organics in our environment, the symposium will examine learnings from its application to agriculture, mining, urban environments and infrastructure.

Speakers will discuss research into the use of recycled organic products to enhance agricultural production in degraded and marginal landscapes and enable the environmental rehabilitation.

Organics regeneration: Australian Organics Recycling Association

To renew and regenerate is a fundamental and everyday principal to an industry dedicated to the recovery and beneficial reuse of organics, writes the Australian Organics Recycling Association’s Diana De Hulsters and Peter Wadewitz.

Read more

AORA 2019 National Conference wrap-up

The Australian Organics Recycling Association brought together recycling suppliers, researchers and packaging associations all under the one roof to identify cost-effective and sustainable solutions to organics. 

Read more

Climate change impact: MRA Consulting

MRA’s Mike Ritchie speaks to Waste Management Review about the waste sector’s contribution to national emissions and its role in meeting Australia’s commitment to the Paris Agreement.  

Read more

International Compost Awareness Week kicks off in May

International Compost Awareness Week (ICAW) will see global organisations band together to build awareness of the benefits of compost.

Activities and celebrations will take place in Australia, the United States, Canada, Europe, Ireland and the Czech Republic in the first full week of May.

Starting in Canada in 1995, ICAW has grown into an annual international event as more people, businesses, municipalities, schools and organisations begin to recognise the importance of compost and the long-term benefits of organics recycling.

Australian Organics Recycling Association National Executive Officer Diana De Hulsters said the goal of the program is to raise public awareness of how the use of compost can improve and maintain high quality soil, grow healthy plants, reduce the use of fertiliser and pesticides, improve water quality and protect the environment.

“Globally we have seen that innovative programs and successful efforts have improved organics recycling and sustainability,” Ms Hulsters said.

“International partners are coming together to broaden the understanding of compost use and promote awareness of the recycling of organic residuals.”

Ms Hulsters said while details vary amongst countries, a number of the facts about organics recycling and compost use transcend political and cultural boundaries.

“Soil health and productivity are dependent on organic matter in the form of compost or humus to provide the sustenance for biological diversity in the soil,” Ms Hulsters said.

“Plants depend on this to convert materials into plant-available nutrients and to keep the soil well-aerated. Additional benefits include the reduced need for pesticide usage to ward off soil-borne and other plant diseases.”

Ms Hulsters also highlighted the climate change mitigation benefits of composting by explaining how compost soil returns serve as a carbon bank.

“Diverting food and yard waste from landfills reduces the emission of methane, a greenhouse gas twenty-five times more powerful than carbon dioxide,” Ms Hulsters said.

“The use of landfill space and incineration can be reduced by at least one-third when organics are recycled. Focused attention on recycling organic residuals is key to achieving high diversion rates.”

The ICAW program includes tours of compost facilities, school gardening programs, compost workshops, lectures by gardening experts and compost give-away days.

Related stories:

AORA announces new board directors

The Australian Organics Recycling Association (AORA) have announced Elmore Compost & Organics Managing Director Frank Harney and SOLICO General Manager Charlie Emery will join the associations Board of Directors.

The Board of Directors serves to represent the interests of AORA members and manage operations specific to their regions.

Mr Harney said he will use the position to educate farmers and consumers about the benefits of organic compost, while further developing application equipment and composting best practice.

Mr Emery said he hopes to use his experience in strategic planning and business development initiatives to work towards the production of quality assured soil and advance the organics recycling industry.

The announcement follows AORA’s release of a new constitution earlier this month.

Related stories:

AORA to host annual conference

The Australian Organics Recycling Association will hold its annual conference on the 1 to 3 of May at the Esplanade Hotel in Perth.

Well established as a principal conference for the Australian recycled organics industry, the event will feature speeches and panel discussions that examine policy, practices, technology and equipment relevant to the industry.

The event aims to explore the renew and regenerate principal, paying specific attention to end-product and its soil regeneration applications.

Keynote addresses will be delivered by two international guests, University of Washington research professor Sally Brown and Italian Composting and Biogas Association senior expert Marco Ricci.

Click here for more information

More than $11 million to stop food and garden waste going to landfill

The NSW Government is awarding approximately $11 million in grants to boost food and garden organics recycling and reduce the amount of waste sent to landfill.

NSW Environment Protection Authority Head of Organics Amanda Kane said that every year in NSW, more than a million tonnes of food and garden waste ends up in landfill. The grants are part of $105.5 million dedicated to diverting organics waste from landfill through the Waste Less, Recycle More initiative.

Related stories:

Ms Kane said that through the initiative the EPA is able to provide support to councils, the waste industry, not-for-profit organisations and businesses to keep food and garden waste out of landfill.

“This includes supporting projects that increase food donation to people in need, boost new kerbside collection services, provide education on food waste, develop new markets and invest in new organics processing infrastructure,” she said.

“Already through the initiative $44.3 million has been awarded to 90 projects to increase processing capacity for food and garden waste in NSW by 430,000 tonnes a year.”

The grants are being awarded through three programs:

  • $9,766,235 is being awarded to 16 projects through the Organics Infrastructure Large and Small grant program for new infrastructure to build or expand organics waste facilities, increase processing capacity and fund new equipment, like refrigerated vans and freezers, to enable food relief agencies to collect more donated food.
  • $765,076 will be shared between 10 not-for-profit organisations and local councils through the Food Donation Education grant program to collect and redistribute good quality surplus food to people in need, helping divert some of the 200,000 tonnes of food waste from business, that ends up in landfill in NSW each year.
  • $633,445 is being awarded to six projects through the Organics Market Developmentgrant program to increase the markets for compost in NSW.

“Waste Less Recycle More is the largest waste and recycling funding program in Australia with a total of $802 million in funding, managed by the NSW EPA, in partnership with the Environment Trust.”