Glass and plastics could be used to help build footpaths

End-of-life plastics and glass fines could soon be used in the construction of footpaths instead of going to landfill, according to a new study from the Swinburne University of Technology.

The research found plastics and glass fines could be incorporated into concrete footpaths while still meeting the standard requirements, and without compromising the mechanical properties.

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It is estimated that approximately 100,000 tonnes of flexible plastics end up in landfill each year, and only 48 per cent of glass waste is recovered for recycling, according to Sustainability Victoria.

The next step for this project is to include local governments and industries to increase the amount of recycled content in footpath construction.

“The use of recovered plastics and glass fines in concrete footpaths will divert significant quantities of these materials from landfill, while reducing the demand for virgin construction materials,” said Swinburne University of Technology’s Dr Yat Choy Wong.

This research project is one of seven projects that investigate new ways to increase the use of recovered class and flexible plastics.

Plastics & Waste Conference 2016

Thursday 17 November 2016,
Mantra Bell City Hotel, Preston, VIC

The annual Plastics & Waste Conference is organised by the Society of Plastics Engineers. It will include presentations about government policy and strategy, technology developments and European progress in recovery and recycling of plastic materials. These themes will be supported with data, technical progress in resource recovery, potential solutions, developments in biodegradable plastics and success stories in recovery and recycling.

For further information contact Han Michel on 0416 168 255 or email hanmichel@bigpond.com

www.plastics.org.au