Scania launches natural gas engine

Scania has expanded its alternative fuel and sustainable transport range with the launch of a OC09 compressed natural gas (CNG) engine at the Brisbane Truck Show.

Based on Scania’s 9.0-litre five-cylinder engine, the OC09 works using spark plugs and complete combustion in accordance with the Otto principle gas power cycle.

Scania Senior Engineer Folke Fritzson said sustainability was a driving factor behind the engines development.

“As with Europe, in Australia there is a small but growing band of operators and businesses keen to investigate the benefits of operating vehicles on alternative or renewable fuels,” Mr Fritzson said.

“Natural gas provides a CO2 reduction of 15 per cent, while biogas from waste water can cut CO2 emissions by up to 90 per cent.”

Mr Fritzson said Scania Australia have signed a memorandum of understanding with natural gas consultants NVG Group.

“This will ensure operators of Scania’s CNG fuelled vehicles enjoy a reliable fuel supply,” Mr Fritzson said.

Scania Head of Service Concepts Anders Ekstrom said the OC09 has an unusually high torque for the engine type, making it useful in a number of different applications.

“Regardless of the type of gas used, the drivability of Scania’s gas engine is in line with what conventional diesel engines can offer in terms of torque and power,” Mr Ekstrom said.

“Gas, and of course biogas in particular, are of particular interest from a European perspective with the potential for reductions in both CO2 and other emissions.”

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Scania and Visy work towards sustainability

Scania has delivered 10 new P 450 6×4 prime movers to Visy Logistics’ Truganina site as part of its Ecolution sustainability initiative to reduce emissions.

Scania Australia Vehicle Connected Driver Services Manager Richard Bain said the new vehicles will deliver significant savings in fuel, reduced exhaust emissions and a boost to Visy’s road safety record.

“The trucks will deliver Visy’s recycled cardboard products, manufactured at its state-of-the-art factory in Truganina, to customers across metropolitan Melbourne.”

Mr Bain said the 13-litre engine prime movers are among the most efficient available and are fitted with the standard Scania NTG safety package, comprising lane departure warning, adaptive cruise control and electronic stability control.

“The Scania Ecolution trial will give Visy full visibility of how the truck fleet is being driven, how much fuel is being used and how emissions are being reduced, as well as directing its maintenance requirements,” Mr. Bain said.

“The Ecolution programme begins with a tailor-made specification of the prime mover, designed exactly to meet the needs of the task.”

According to Mr Bain, by using Scania’s onboard communicator and global connectivity system, Visy fleet management will be able to monitor how the vehicles are being driven, highlight deviations and allow Scania’s trainers to keep drivers performing at peak efficiency levels.

“Scania Ecolution is a powerful solution producing substantial fuel and CO2 reductions for our customer – helping to drive our ambition of providing the market’s most sustainable and profitable transport solutions,” Mr Bain said.

“By offering Visy Logistics this suite of features through the Ecolution trial, we are delivering on our strategy to be a leader in the shift towards a sustainable transport system.”

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Scania to showcase Euro 6

Scania has announced it will only display Euro 6 compliant vehicles at the upcoming Brisbane Truck Show.

Sales Director Dean Dal Santo said the decision illustrates the company’s commitment to reduced carbon emissions and its desire to lead the shift towards sustainable transport systems in Australia.

“Our customers, and our customers’ customers are now demanding a smaller carbon footprint from transport logistics in order to meet their own environmental targets, and Scania is fully equipped to deliver on this need.

“We look forward to discussing our pathways towards Total Operating Economy and a smaller carbon footprint with all businesses interested in reducing their operating costs and boosting their profitability,” Mr Dal Santo said.

Despite the Federal Government not adopting Euro 6 emissions regulations for commercial vehicles, 90 per cent of Scania vehicles sold in the country were equipped with Euro 6 technology.

The first vehicle on display will be the new 650 horsepower V8 Euro 6 engine fitted in an R-series prime mover, complete with 3300 nanometres of torque, and ideally suited to long haulage work.

There will also be two G 500 6-cylinder Euro 6 prime movers on the stand: one in G 500 road freight guise and the second in G 500 XT specified for construction duties, complete with steel tipper body.

The final vehicle will be a P 340 Euro 6, 6×2 gas-fuelled rigid truck, a specification seen for the first time in Australia. This green, clean and efficient vehicle carries twin large-capacity compressed natural gas tanks, and can offer vastly reduced CO2 emissions.

At an event in Melbourne earlier this month, Scania President and CEO Henrick Henriksson said companies unwilling to move with current trends towards carbon reduction would face consumer backlash. He added that change would not be possible unless driven by commercial vehicle manufacturers like Scania.

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Fuel cell powered waste collection vehicle in development

Commercial vehicle manufacturer Scania has teamed up with Swedish waste company Renova to develop a fuel cell powered refuse truck with a fully electrified power train and compactor.

The two companies aim to reduce emissions and noise to make the electrified vehicles an attractive alternative when working in residential areas at early hours of the morning.

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Renova and other waste handling companies have previously carried out trials with electric refuse trucks, however this will be the first with fuel cells.

Scania Electric Powertrain Technology Project Manager Marita Nilsson said the company is highly interested in gaining more experience of fuel cells in actual customer operations.

“Fuel cells constitute a promising technology in the needed decarbonisation of transports,” Ms Nilsson said.

Renova Head of Development Hans Zackrisson said electrification using fuel cells fuelled by hydrogen is a highly appealing alternative for heavy commercial vehicles such as refuse trucks.

“The trucks benefit from all the advantages of electrification while maintaining some of the best aspects of fossil-fuel operations, namely range, hours in service and payload,” Mr Zackrisson said.

Scania has also previously partnered with Norwegian food wholesaler Asko to develop hydrogen fuel cell technology for its production plant.

The project is being implemented in cooperation with the Swedish Energy Agency and Stockholm’s Royal Institute of Technology. The fuel cell refuse truck is expected to be delivered in the end of 2019 or by the beginning of 2020.