Building a more resilient sector: Sustainability Victoria

Waste Management Review speaks to Stan Krpan, Chief Executive Officer at Sustainability Victoria, about the organisation’s future approach to data capture, Victoria’s e-waste ban to landfill and the health of the waste sector.

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SV research finds who throws out the most food in Victoria

Young Victorians and parents with children are key contributors to the state’s food waste dilemma, according to new research commissioned by Sustainability Victoria.

The research findings showed that Generation Z throw out $115 of food waste weekly, compared to Baby Boomers who reported just over a tenth of that at $17 per week.

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The research also found that almost half (46 per cent) of Victorians are not aware of how much money they are throwing in the bin in the form of food waste, with nine out of every 10 feeling guilt about how much food they waste.

Men were reported to waste close to twice as much as women, throwing away $54 in food waste compared to $29.

Parents with children under the age of 16 years old were also highly likely to throw out food, with more than one third believing it is their children who are responsible for the waste.

More than three quarters of respondents to the research showed a strong desire to save money on groceries, with the average Victorian household throwing away more than $2000 a year worth of food.

The research was conducted by QDOS research, which surveyed 1001 Australians over the age of 18 years old.

The findings are part of a new campaign which has launched called Love Food Hate Waste, Love a List – which encouraged Victorians to write better shopping lists and stick to them to reduce food waste and save money.

The Victorian Government has also announced an additional $1 million funding for the Love Food Hate Waste campaign to reduce food waste through to 2021.

The research findings found that only 43 per cent of Victorians shopped with a list, with 46 per cent admitting they buy food they don’t need.

Sustainability Victoria CEO Stan Krpan said that preventing food from being wasted is the best way to address the costly problem.

“We know from previous research that households that use a shopping list reduce their food waste compared to those who don’t. Through the Love Food Hate Waste, Love a List campaign, we’re giving Victorians the tools they need to reduce their food waste,” said Mr Krpan.

Comedian Cal Wilson hosted a documentary to highlight the issue of food waste, which has significant environmental impacts. She said she was genuinely shocked at how much food is thrown out.

“There’s so much we can do to reduce food waste that doesn’t include overeating, or giving leftovers as presents. A really great first step is making a shopping list and sticking to it,” said Ms Wilson

Sustainability Victoria recommends threes ways to shop smarter, which are planning the week’s meals, writing a list and eating everything that has been bought.

$4.2M Resource Recovery Infrastructure Fund announced

The Victorian Government has announced funding for 13 new resource recovery infrastructure projects, comprising more than $4.2 million from the second round of its Resource Recovery Infrastructure Fund.

Managed by statutory authority Sustainability Victoria, the new projects, worth more than $47 million and all in rural and regional Victoria, are expected to create 50 jobs and divert around 85,000 tonnes of waste from landfill each year.

Eight of the 13 projects are being delivered by local government which will include $2.4 million in funding. Projects include new or upgraded council resource recovery centres in the rural cities of Benalla and Wangaratta, and the Campaspe, Mitchell, Moira, Toowong and Yarriambiack Shires.

Campaspe Shire is being funded $275,000 for two projects to expand its combined collection of food organics and garden organics for composting. It will also invest in collecting and compressing soft plastics and expanded polystyrene to increase the capacity to recycle these products.

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Private sector projects funded include large-scale composting operations near Camperdown, Shepparton and the Latrobe Valley, and a waste to energy plant using commercial and industrial waste and other products near Bacchus Marsh.

A Mildura based recycling company that makes a range of products from recycled plastics is also receiving support to increase its production capacity.

Sustainability Victoria Chief Executive Officer Stan Krpan said the $13.6 million Resource Recovery Infrastructure Fund aims to support the development of infrastructure which improves the collection and processing of recycled materials.

“The Victorian government is investing at record levels in programs to develop markets for recovered resources, facilitate private investment in resource recovery infrastructure and educate households and businesses about how to better manage waste,” Mr Krpan said.

“With recent changes to international recycling markets, infrastructure investments are crucial to ensuring we continue to develop our local industry and in doing so, facilitate innovation and create jobs,” Mr Krpan said.

Environment Minister Lily D’Ambrosio said the Victorian Government is developing a circular economy that maximises the reuse of materials, increases recycling and reduces the amount of waste that goes to landfill.

Fourteen round one projects were announced in July 2017. They received $5 million and will divert at least 350,000 tonnes of waste materials from landfill and create an estimated 85 jobs.

NEW FUNDING APPLICATIONS OPEN

Applications for the third round of the Resource Recovery Infrastructure Funding have also opened. Up to $3 million is available for infrastructure projects across Victoria. Grants of between $40,000 and $500,000 are available.

Information about how to apply for round three funding can be found by clicking here. 

FUNDED PROJECTS                                                                                                               

Grant recipientProject descriptionGovernment fundingTotal project cost
Benalla Rural City CouncilA best-practice resource recovery transfer station will be built at a council’s landfill site, significantly improving the effectiveness and efficiency of the Benalla landfill and lift the amount of material not going to landfill from 35 per cent to 55 per cent.$440,000$900,00
Campaspe ShireCampaspe Shire is being funded for two projects, including a new opt-in kerbside food and garden organics collection service for 2000 households and a food organics collection for nearly 6000 residents who now have a garden waste collection service.

Two compactors to compress soft plastics and expanded polystyrene will be installed at the Mt Scobie and Echuca resource recovery centres increasing the recovery of these materials which are expensive to transport if not compacted.

Collection bins for flexible plastics will be installed at eight resource recovery centres and later at council offices, schools, neighbourhood houses, disability services and businesses to maximise convenience for residents.

$295,155$555,288
Mitchell ShireA new resource recovery centre will be built on council-owned land, next to its Hilldene landfill and prioritise waste minimisation, resource reuse and recovery over disposal.$500,000$2,585,000
Moira ShireCobram’s resource recovery facility will be upgraded to enable industrial waste sorting which accounts for 45 per cent (6000 tonnes) of the waste that is currently disposed at the landfill. The project aims to divert half of this material (e.g soft plastics, cardboard, soil, concrete, metals and timber) from landfill.$495,000$993,000
Towong ShireTowong Shire is upgrading Corryong’s resource recovery centre and Tallangatta’s transfer station, diverting up to 30 per cent of priority materials like rigid and soft plastics, e-waste, glass, timber and cardboard from landfill. Towong Shire will also establish two resale shops, public access to recycling skips at Corryong and improve storage capacity at each site.$40,000 $480,000
Wangaratta Rural City CouncilA new organics processing facility will be built at the Bowser East landfill which will be capable of processing up to 12,000 tonnes of material each year.$500,000$3.58m
Yarriambiack ShireWarracknabeal’s transfer station will be upgraded and the neighbouring landfill closed to allow for more recyclables to be collected, including agricultural soft plastics like grain bags and tarpaulins.$140,000$290,000
Camperdown CompostA facility upgrade includes development of improved compostables receival and storage areas, upgraded screening and pre-sorting processes including plastic extraction equipment, new aeration and watering systems to maximise the effectiveness of the composting process.$500,000$2.67m
iGas Operations Pty Ltd A new waste-to-energy facility will be established at the Maddingley Brown Coal site near Bacchus Marsh. The plant will process 100,000 tonnes of waste a year, including material from plantation timber processing, construction and industrial waste, plastics and product left over from paper making.$500,000$29.86m
Integrated RecyclingThis Mildura company makes timber replacement products from recycled plastics. It is upgrading its raw material storage area and upgrading one of its production lines to double production capacity. Its products are sold throughout Australia.$130,000$420,000
Pinegro ProductsAn enclosed tunnel composting facility will be built near Morwell on the company’s existing 8.9-hectare site. Compost will be made in climate-controlled tunnels which manage leachate waters and reduce odour. The project includes construction of buildings, four composting tunnels, air and water treatment systems and a computer-controlled processing and management system. The company currently has an open windrow composting system.$500,000$5m
Western Composting TechnologyThe company plans to boost production of compost made from food and green organic material at its Shepparton site. This will include diverting an extra 4500 tonnes a year from landfill by using commercial food waste from commercial collections in the Barwon and South West Victoria regions, the Goulburn Valley, Loddon-Mallee and north-east Victoria.$215,302$717,675

SV release new tech guide

Sustainability Victoria has released a new guide that details the current and emerging technologies for resource recovery.

Sustainability Victoria Chief Executive Officer Stan Krpan said there is a need to find new and productive uses for waste as Victoria’s population grows.

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“With this Resource Recovery Technology Guide, we have analysed both current and emerging resource recovery technologies to support government and industry to make decisions about the most appropriate technology to suit their needs,” Mr Krpan said.

“In providing a summary of available technologies, their associated waste streams, regulatory requirements and potential costs, we want to make it easy to understand technologies that will help guide decisions to benefit the environment and the community,” he said.

The guide includes technologies found in traditional material recovery facilities, complex mixed facilities, mechanical and biological treatment, as well as energy from waste. And advanced fuels produced from waste.

“Some of these technologies have the potential to continue our move away from landfills, especially for residual waste which cannot be recycled and ends up in landfill. We know that resource recovery creates many new jobs and drives investment in regional communities,” Mr Krpan said.

“Victoria is thinking circular and we are committed to improving the way we manage our waste and generating value from our resources. This guide points us on the new directions and opportunities some of which are already being used and some which we may borrow that have been successful overseas,” he said.

Sustainability Victoria has also released a revised Guide to Biological Recovery of Organics to help readers understand the regulations, requirements and best practice methods for biological processing of organics.

“Organic wastes make up a large proportion of the waste generated in Victoria and the recovery of organics offers a significant opportunity to reduce the environmental impacts of landfill,” Mr Krpan said.

Mr Krpan said the revised guide helps local government, industry and community groups understand the biological recovery of organics. It discusses feedstocks, technologies, and the costs and planning involved.

“We have heard from local government that there is a great need for authoritative information and guidance on processing technologies and advanced resource recovery. We worked with industry experts to create really practical guides that we hope are used widely.”

SUEZ, ACOR, SV respond to Environment Minister meeting

Stakeholders have largely welcomed the commitments made on Friday by state and territory ministers at April’s Meeting of Environment Ministers – with some suggestions.

Federal Government, state and territory ministers and the President of the Australian Local Government Association met on Friday to set a sustainable path for Australia’s recyclable waste, in the seventh Meeting of Environment Ministers. Taking action on recycled waste in the wake of China’s restrictions on imports was the focus of the meeting. Australia is one of over 100 countries affected by China’s new restrictions, affecting around 1.3 million tonnes of our recycled waste. Read the story on the outcomes of the meeting here.

Australia’s National Waste Policy will be updated by the end of this year to include circular economy principles, along with a target endorsed of 100 per cent Australian packaging being recyclable, compostable or reusable by 2025.

They pledged for new product stewardship schemes for photovoltaic solar panels and batteries, while also agreeing to explore waste to energy further and advocate using recycled materials in government procurement.

While making a number of pledges, ministers agreed to have a teleconference in mid-June to discuss progress on recycling, and to meet in late 2018 to further progress delivery of the commitments on Friday.

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SUEZ Australia & New Zealand Chief Executive Officer Mark Venhoek welcomed the government’s focus on making 100 per cent of products recyclable and re-useable by 2025. He noted that swift action and investment needs to be made to ensure that this goal is met.

“As a waste industry, we are falling behind globally and we require fast action to stimulate the local market for recycled and recovered products,” Mr Venhoek said.

“We support the government’s 100 per cent recycled packaging goal which will create a sustainable demand for these products, but believe that it should be mandatory that packaged products can be re-used.

“Collaboration to achieving this is key and without investment from government and a commitment from packaging manufacturers and industry working together, we will not achieve this goal.”

Mr Venhoek also welcomed the commitment from different levels of government to explore waste to energy projects and the support for the technology from the Clean Energy Finance Corporation and the Australian Renewable Energy Agency.

“Energy from waste technology is the missing link in the waste management hierarchy and waste infrastructure in Australia. After reduction, re-use and recycling, there is a crucial element: to recover the energetic value from waste,” he said.

Sustainability Victoria Chief Executive Officer Stan Krpan said leadership is crucial to ensuring we have a sustainable recycling industry that Australians can be proud of.

Mr Krpan said yesterday’s commitments align with the Victorian Government’s suite of waste strategies and programs that move the state toward a circular economy.

“Supporting our local recycling industry to move towards a circular economy is reflected in the ministers’ commitment to increasing our recycling capacity, advocating for the increased use of recycled material and creating targets for the use of recycled content in packaging,” he said.

“We are also encouraged the strong support of product stewardship schemes and the increasing in the procurement of recycled goods government and industry buy,” he said.

“Large procurements by government and companies can influence upstream design to reduce waste and packaging and trigger other innovations.”

ACOR Chief Executive Officer Pete Shmigel said the right chords have been struck by ministers about investing in recycling’s future, but we did not hear two very important sounds: implementation details and dollars in the till.

“The recycling industry welcomes commitments about ensuring recyclability of packaging products, buying recycled content products by governments, expanding domestic reprocessing capacity and developing a new national plan,” he said.

“However, today’s ministerial announcement lacks comprehensive targets for all measures, and consequences for underperformance, that make practice from theory.”

Mr Shmigel said pro-recycling policy principles are welcome, but pro-recycling positive action and investment is now to be expected.

“As ACOR, we look forward to working directly with the Clean Energy Finance Corporation to identify and facilitate a strengthened investment presence in resource recovery – including in an expedited timeframe. There are good projects that merit backing among our members.”

“As ACOR, we strongly question the timeframe given for products’ recyclability as packaging is getting more complex each day and resulting in greater contamination and community cost each day that passes. By 2025, millions of tonnes of potential contamination would have passed through the system without the producers of packaging taking greater responsibility for their decisions.

Mr Shmigel said similar commitments were given in the 2009 National Waste Policy and, on current timeframes, it will be 16 years by the time they have been realised, describing it as “truly mediocre”.

“Finally, further work is urgently needed at state levels to ensure that recyclate does not need to be disposed to landfill in the short-term.”

Waste Management Association of Australia (WMAA) Chief Executive Officer Gayle Sloan said it is extremely pleasing that the National Waste Strategy will be updated by the end of this year and WMAA looks forward to participating in this.

“The endorsement by Ministers of a target of 100 percent of Australian packaging being recyclable or reusable by 2025 is heartening, and we look forward to working with government to develop meaningful targets from at least 2020 to ensure that this actually achieved,” Ms Sloan said.

“Industry recalls targets set previously under the National Packaging Covenant that were never monitored or achieved, and once this failure was recognised it was just too late.”

Ms Sloan said while there was no new funding for recycling in Friday’s announcement, one thing WMAA will advocate to start immediately is government at all levels spending existing funds differently.

“Ministers must go much further than simply advocating for increased use of recycled materials in the goods that government and industry buy.

“With over 90 per cent of the community supporting recycling and the purchase of recycled products by government, government needs to hold itself to account and if it does not prioritise the use of recycled material, to report to the community why it does not, this should be the norm going forward, not the exception,” she said.

WMAA in a statement said the federal government must show leadership in this space and act now to grow demand for recycled products that can develop markets and jobs in both metropolitan and regional areas. For example, it said Commonwealth Federal Assistance Grants to local government should be predicated on councils using more recycled glass sand and not virgin sand.

“Industry absolutely recognises that there is a place for waste to energy in Australia as an alternate to landfill, and we support this technology. However, it cannot replace recycling and remanufacturing.”

Director of Boomerang Alliance Jeff Angel, which looks after 47 national, state and local groups, described the voluntary approach to recycled products as “weak.”

“Mandatory rules, as in Europe, are the only assured way to establish a stable and growing market to justify the investment into new manufacturing,” Mr Angel said.

“If we can have an enforceable renewable energy target, then we can have a similar system for recycled content. A lot of questions remain to be answered about the 100 per cent recyclable, compostable or reusable target including collection capacity – it’s not just about labels.”

Federal Government Environment Minister Josh Frydenberg on Friday said finding a solution to the 1.3 million tonnes of recyclable waste is an urgent and important issue which requires a coordinated approach from supply right through to demand.

“It is also an opportunity for Australia to develop its capabilities and capacity in recycling through effective cooperation and collaboration among the three levels of government,” he said.

South Melbourne Market wins sustainability award

The South Melbourne Market has been recognised for its recycling efforts by the Institute of Public Administration Australia’s (IPAA) Victoria Environmental Sustainability Award.

The market also won the equally prestigious Environmental Sustainability Award at the 2017 LGPro Awards for Excellence.

Port Phillip Council owns and manages the popular South Melbourne Market, and both awards were for the market’s innovative organic waste systems.

The market’s role in recycling tonnes of food, vegetable and other waste is reducing both costs and greenhouse gas emissions.

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The market’s award-winning waste program includes two processes that recycle organic waste – a vermicomposting worm farm project and the installation of a GaiaRecycle machine that heats and dehydrates organic material.

This has seen more than a 90 per cent reduction in organic waste volume at the market and spawned the production of two nutrient-rich, garden fertiliser products sold at the market.

The market’s recycling efforts has led to the processing 400 cubic metres of green waste in 2016/17 (equivalent to 22 garbage trucks) through the worm farm. Market Magic is a mix of worm faeces and mushroom compost which is sold at the market.

An onsite bottle crusher processes 15 tonnes of glass a year, and the Gaia recycling unit turns 8.4 tonnes of food and waste into compost every week which then gets sold at the market.

Polystyrene boxes are compressed into bricks which are made into a wide range of plastic products, including CD cases, coat hangers, picture frames, toys, and pens, stapler bodies and rulers. Some are used as alternatives to wood for products, such as interior decorative mouldings, or hollow foam blocks, that can be filled with concrete to form walls with better sound and thermal characteristics than conventional concrete blocks.

SecondBite also collect leftover fresh food from the market and redistribute it to people in need. Last year, the market gave nearly 24 tonnes of fresh food, which could feed nearly 50,000 people.

The IPAA award was sponsored by statutory authority – Sustainability Victoria.

“As community expectations about environmental sustainability grows and waste disposal costs rise, it’s clear that the South Melbourne’s market is hitting the mark on both counts,” Sustainability Victoria CEO Stan Krpan said.

“The South Melbourne Market’s comprehensive program could be applied to other markets and shopping centres, not just in Melbourne, but around Australia.”

“The City of Port Phillip, market management and the businesses that operate there are doing a great job to reduce the amount of waste going to landfills, reducing greenhouse gas emissions and helping vulnerable people in the community.”

Port Phillip Council Mayor Bernadene Voss said the award-winning systems were proving it was possible to successfully divert organic waste from landfill at such a large scale.

“Our market is the first retail market in Australia to adopt this technology and the results really are outstanding,” Cr Voss said. “Thanks to our twin award-winning projects, we’re already diverted from landfill about 950 tonnes of green and food waste.

“Shoppers here can take a bow too, because when they choose produce here, they automatically divert more on-site organic waste from landfill. Our stallholders also deserve praise because they’ve fully supported this innovative waste management program and helped us deliver the widespread benefits.”

“I would like to congratulate Port Phillip Council for their excellent project that pushed the boundaries and demonstrated what success in public administration looks like,” said The Institute of Public Administration Victoria CEO David Ali.

“These awards are one of the few opportunities we have as a sector to acknowledge the ‘wins’ and the people who strive for excellence across our state.”

Stan Krpan returns as head of Sustainability Victoria

Stan Krpan has returned to statutory authority Sustainability Victoria as Chief Executive officer after spending five months as head of the Victorian Cladding Taskforce.

Mr Krpan said he was pleased to be back at Sustainability Victoria and looked forward to re-connecting with his colleagues, stakeholders and the industry to deliver on its SV2020 strategy, which works towards a sustainable, low emissions Victoria.

He thanked his colleagues Jonathon Leake, Carl Muller and Stephanie Ziersch who acted as Interim CEO during his absence.

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In early July, Mr Krpan accepted the secondment as Chief Executive Officer of a taskforce to investigate the extent of non-compliant cladding on Victorian buildings.

The taskforce assessed more than 1400 Victorian buildings, with all of them declared safe to occupy despite 220 buildings not complying with regulations. The taskforce will continue its work to ensure buildings are rectified.

Mr Krpan returned to Sustainability Victoria as CEO on Monday.

He said his experience at the taskforce had been rewarding as they worked to deliver recommendations to the Victorian Government on how to improve compliance and enforcement of building regulations to better protect building occupants.

“It was rewarding to work collaboratively across government authorities, key agencies, including fire engineers and industry professionals, to deliver a thorough, timely and practical approach to this issue,” Mr Krpan said.

Mr Krpan said his time at the taskforce had given him the chance to reflect on all the good work Sustainability Victoria had been doing in his absence.

“The leadership team did a fantastic job. There have been some learnings along the way which I can take back to my role at Sustainability Victoria. I look forward to leading the organisation once again as we deliver on our clear direction of helping Victorians take action on climate change and use resources wisely,” he said.