QLD awards resource recovery development grants

Stream one grant recipients of the Queensland Government’s $100 million Resource Recovery Industry Development Program (RRIDP) are estimated to divert 32,160 tonnes of waste from landfill each year.

Acting Infrastructure Minister Stirling Hinchliffe said the RRIDP aims to transform Queensland’s resource recovery industry by supporting projects that divert waste from landfill, reduce stockpiling and create jobs.

“Over 120 applications from across Queensland were received, which is a fantastic result and demonstrates the interest and capacity for the development of this industry,” Mr Hinchliffe said.

“For this round of stream one, projects were assessed on multiple criteria including contribution to development of industry, tonnes per dollar rates of diversion and projects that addressed waste that is historically hard to get rid of.”

Three streams of funding available under the program, with stream one providing dollar-for-dollar capital grants between $50,000 and $5 million for infrastructure projects that enhance or build new facilities, or for capital investments in new processing and technological capabilities.

Stream two provides incentives to attract or expand resource recovery operations, while stream three aims to grow Queensland’s resource recovery industry by attracting investments in new infrastructure.

The five recipients of RRIDP funding are:

— Astron Plastics: $2.5 million to divert 6,300 tonnes per annum of soft plastic waste.
— Cairns Regional Council: $295,400 to divert 18,735 tonnes per annum of construction and demolition waste.
— Elliott Agriculture: $325,000 to divert 2,256 tonnes per annum of organic waste.
— Townsville City Council: $60,000 to divert 572 tonnes per annum of general waste.
— Horne Group: $265,882 to divert 4,297 tonnes per annum of construction and demolition waste.

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Queensland councils receive $5M to get levy ready

In a move to get Queensland Councils levy ready, the State Government will invest $5 million before the introduction of the waste disposal levy on 4 March 2019.

Local governments can apply for funding under the 2018-19 Local Government Levy Ready Grant Program to support infrastructure improvements at waste disposal facilities.

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The program will be open for submissions between 31 August and 12 October 2018.

Possible examples of infrastructure are fencing, security cameras, traffic control, weighbridges, gatehouses, upgrading IT or signage.

The grant program is being administered by the department of Local Government, Racing and Multicultural Affairs on behalf of the Department of Environment and Science.

Queensland Environment Minister Leeanne Enoch said the Queensland Government want to ensure councils have efficient, accurate and secure levy collection and landfill facilities.

“Local councils with waste disposal facilities where annual disposal of more than 5,000 tonnes of waste is allowed can apply for infrastructure funding for weighbridges and gatehouses,” Ms Enoch said.

“The Queensland Government is committed to making sure there is no impact on municipal waste collection through the introduction of the waste levy.

“There will be no extra cost to putting your wheelie bin on the footpath each week, and we are keeping that commitment,” she said.

Ms Enoch said Queensland’s new waste disposal levy would also lead to the creation of jobs, local waste management and resource recovery solutions, and market development, particularly in regional areas.

“This will provide a growing incentive for the community and business to take advantage of expanding resource recovery and recycling options across the state,” she said.

“The levy will also bring Queensland in line with New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, and Western Australia, which have similar levies.

Queensland introduced a waste levy in 2011, which saw resource recovery companies investing in new recycling and processing infrastructure, however it was later repealed.

Local Government Minister Stirling Hinchliffe said the amount of waste generated in Queensland was increasing faster than Queensland’s population was growing.

“Reintroducing a waste disposal levy is part of our broader strategy to improve waste recycling and recovery and support jobs growth,” Mr Hinchliffe said.

“Our local councils will play a key role in helping their communities reduce waste and increase resource recovery.”

For more information about the grant program, click here.

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