The NWRIC’s visionary policy

The National Waste and Recycling Industry Council CEO Rose Read highlights the association’s priorities in 2019 and its long-term plan for resource recovery in Australia. 

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City of Belmont trials fully electric vehicle recycling truck

SUEZ has selected the City of Belmont as the first site in Western Australia for its innovative new fully electric vehicle (EV) recycling truck.

SUEZ State General Manager WA Craig Barker said the EV truck is the first-of-its-kind for the company in Western Australia and will be a showcase for the future of waste collection.

“SUEZ is always looking for new ways to deliver services to customers,” Mr Barker said.

“This new generation of waste collection vehicle is only now becoming available here, and we are keen to test this proven technology for our Belmont customers ahead of wider demand from our other council customers.”

The EV truck features an Iveco cab chassis fitted with an electric powered drive train fitted by SEA Electric in a SuperiorPak body. The 230k kilowatt battery provides more than 200 kilometre driving range before recharge, which only requires a simple 32-amp, three-phase outlet.

The side-loader EV truck will save approximately 35,000 litres of diesel per year, avoiding around 90 tonnes of carbon emissions annually. It is also whisper quiet – an additional and welcome benefit for the City’s residents.

City of Belmont Chief Executive Officer John Christie said the city was excited to be the first in Western Australia to benefit from SUEZ’s new EV truck.

“Reducing carbon emissions is a key element of our City’s Environment and Sustainability Strategy, and innovation in waste management is an important part of this,” Mr Christie said.

“We are delighted that SUEZ’s new zero emissions truck will lead our recycling collections and look forward to seeing it out servicing the community while minimising our environmental impact.

”The new EV truck will be collecting recycling from around the City of Belmont.”

In addition to generating zero emissions, the EV truck offers a huge range of benefits including no diesel or AdBlue fuel costs, minimal oil changes and significantly reduced maintenance.

“Improved braking also means brake pads only need to be replaced every two years, compared to quarterly changes in traditional diesel-powered side-lift trucks,” Mr Barker said.

The side-lift EV truck offers the latest in electric/hydraulic waste collection and compaction and is capable of approximately 1200 lifts per day on a single charge. The acquisition is closely aligned with SUEZ’s commitment to sustainability leadership and to contributing to achieving the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals.

SUEZ was awarded the collections contract for the City of Belmont in November 2018 and will have its new diesel fleet on the road from March 2019. The EV truck is expected to commence service in Belmont from June 2019.

Australian Paper and SUEZ partner on WtE project

Australian Paper has partnered with SUEZ to develop the $600 million Maryvale Mill waste to energy (WtE) project following the successful completion of its feasibility study.

The $7.5 million study was co-funded with the Federal and Victorian Governments.

Australian Paper will now partner with SUEZ  to secure the long-term access to waste required to power the facility.

Australian Paper’s study examined the technical, social, environmental, and commercial feasibility of establishing an WtE facility at Maryvale.

The 18 month study found the facility would operate at a high efficiency of 58 per cent due to the mill’s need for baseload steam and electricity all year round. It would also divert approximately 650,000 tonnes of residual waste from Melbourne and Gippsland landfill, saving 543,000 tonnes of carbon emissions per annum. The new facility would allow the return of up to four Petajoules of natural gas per annum and 30 megawatt-hour per hour of electricity to Victoria’s retail energy market.

Australian Paper Chief Operating Officer Peter Williams said the company is committed to its mission of sustainable growth for the next generation.

“As the largest industrial user of natural gas in Victoria and a significant energy consumer, we must develop alternative baseload energy sources to maintain our future competitiveness,” Mr Williams said.

“Creating energy from waste is a perfect fit with our operations, because in addition to electricity we require significant quantities of thermal energy to generate steam. A WtE facility at Maryvale would secure ongoing investment at the site, support employment growth in the Latrobe Valley and also provide the missing link in Victoria’s waste management infrastructure,” Mr Williams said.

A recent economic impact study from Western Research Institute has confirmed that the WtE facility would support an average of 1046 Victorian jobs per annum during the three year construction period and more than 900 when operational.

Australian Paper and SUEZ will seek to finalise waste supply arrangements for the project by 2020. Construction of the WtE facility is planned to begin soon after with completion expected in 2024.

Environment Protection Authority Victoria granted Australian Paper a works approval to develop a large-scale, WtE facility in Victoria at the end of 2018. The facility is proposed to be co-located within the boundaries of the Australian Paper site in Maryvale, Latrobe Valley and process residual municipal solid waste, and industrial and commercial waste.

Wild Mob receives grant from SUEZ for coastlines

The Trust for Wild Mob Trust have secured a $12,460 grant from waste and water management company SUEZ for its Marine Debris Audit, aimed at providing practical methods of sorting, itemising and categorising debris.

The funding will be used to help support the expansion of the Youth Ambassadors Program and carry out a public audit of marine debris collected by volunteers working in the Cumberland Islands. The audit will showcase practical methods of sorting, itemising and categorising debris such as plastic and other rubbish items recovered from turtle nesting beaches and coastal habitats.

Data collected from the audit will be uploaded to Tangaroa Blue’s Australian Marine Debris Database, national database dedicated to identifying how debris impacts different sections of the Australian coastline.

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The Youth Ambassadors Program engages and empowers young people in taking direct action to protect critically endangered ecosystems. Each new project sees ambassadors identify an environmental problem in their area and develop a measurable, achievable and sustainable solution to help solve it.

The Youth Ambassadors Program and the marine audit help Wild Mob advocate for change in reducing plastic pollution reaching the ocean.

Wild Mob CEO Dr Derek Ball said that grant meant the organisation could expand the Youth Ambassadors Program and achieve their goal to promote greater awareness of the impact of debris on our marine environments through the Marine Debris Audit.

“Single-use plastic is the biggest culprit, accumulating on islands in the Great Barrier Reef, causing damage to habitats and wildlife populations,” Dr Ball said.

“It’s great to have the community here and to raise awareness about the waste habits of humans and the devastating impact on critically endangered ecosystems, especially in the Great Barrier Reef.”

Wild Mob Youth Ambassador Briody Fahey said that the Youth Ambassadors feel it is extremely important for young people to take responsibility to care for the environment, particularly fragile marine ecosystems in the Great Barrier Reef.

“In doing so, we hope to educate others on the problems our generation is having to address so we can work together with the wider community to create solutions and bring positive change,” she said.

Kevin Condie, Mackay Depot Manager, attended the Marine Debris Audit on 20 January 2019 to present the cheque to Dr Ball.

“SUEZ is committed to working with local communities to preserve the oceans and avoid waste being released into our marine environments,” said Mr Condie.

“Projects such as the Marine Debris Audit are a great opportunity to raise awareness about the impact of waste and debris on our marine ecosystems and the importance of making sure our oceans and animal habitats are not polluted.”

Now in its fifth year, the SUEZ Community Grants program has donated more than $740,000 in funding to community organisations and projects across Australia that help communities and the environment thrive.

Three-bin rollout for the City of Joondalup

Perth’s City of Joondalup has commenced a three-bin rollout with new look SUEZ waste trucks hitting the streets.

The roll-out will encompass 60,000 residential properties and aligns with the Waste Authority’s Waste Strategy (more information here) to improve waste avoidance and resource recovery. The trucks promote green waste sorting, waste and recycling, displaying the text “Let’s sort” to align with each of the three processes.

The three-bin system has been partly funded by the Better Bins program – a $20 million WA Government initiative that provides funding to local governments to implement better practice kerbside waste collection.

The bin lid colour change will bring the city in line with the Australian Standard – red for general waste, lime green for green waste and yellow for recycling.

During the bin roll-out the city will deliver a new 140-litre red lid bin for general waste and replace the old general waste bin lid with a new lime green lid. The bin will then be used for green waste.

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Joondalup Mayor Albert Jacob said the roll-out of the three-bin system was a significant milestone for the city and the new method of collecting household waste would deliver huge benefits for residents.

“The new system is an integral part of the city’s commitment to meeting the WA Government’s target of diverting 65 per cent of municipal solid waste from landfill by 2020, which is also a key aspiration of the City’s Waste Management Plan,” Mayor Jacob said.

“There has also been a significant increase in disposal costs at landfill from $120 per tonne in 2013-14 to $205 per tonne in 2018-19, and this figure will continue to rise.

“Changing from a two-bin system to a three-bin system provides an opportunity to generate both cost savings for the city, and therefore our ratepayers, as well as reducing the amount of waste that is sent to landfill.

“I encourage residents to embrace these changes and to be more ‘waste wise’ by thinking about ways to reduce the waste they create in their daily lives.”

The new 140-litre red lid general waste bin will have an information pack attached to the lid, providing information on collection days and how to use each bin.

Global waste management market to reach $484 billion by 2025

The global waste management market will add over $180 billion to its value in the next six years according to Allied Market Research (AMR) report.

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East Rockingham first waste-to-energy project for SUEZ

WA’s East Rockingham Resource Recovery Facility has awarded waste management giant SUEZ a 20-year minimum contract as waste management partner.

SUEZ has partnered with a consortium of four companies running the facility – Hitachi Sozen INOVA (HZI), Tribe Infrastructure Group and New Energy Corporation, which won a series of competitive tenders for long-term contracts in the Perth metropolitan area before securing the East Rockingham partnership.

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The facility encompasses the design, construction, financing and operation of a greenfield waste-to-energy facility, 40 kilometres south of the Perth CBD.

The project aims to treat approximately 300,000 tonnes of waste per year from municipal, commercial and industrial sources including up to 30,000 tonnes per year of biosolids.

Energy generation targets are expected to reach 29 megawatts of renewable energy, enough to supply 36,000 homes following the start of construction slated for 2019.

SUEZ will provide 65,000 tonnes per year of commercial and industrial waste, maintenance services, removal of non-processable waste at its Bibra Lake and North Bannister facilities and the purchase of renewable electricity generated for its Perth operations.

This is the second waste-to-energy plant planned for the Rockingham-Kwinana industrial region.

SUEZ propose six-year expansion to Sydney landfill

SUEZ has proposed to expand its Elizabeth Drive Landfill at Kemps Creek in Sydney.

The expansion would increase the current height of the landfill by up to 15 metres which could increase by around 5 million cubic metres. No changes to the existing cell design, cap design or waste disposal methods are involved in the project plan.

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Proposed changes to the capacity of the landfill are estimated to extend the life of the landfill by approximately six years to 2030.

The proposal comes in response to an anticipated increase in waste generation from Sydney’s growing population and several large infrastructure projects in the areas.

Elizabeth Drive Landfill is one of the only sites in the Sydney Basin that is able to receive general construction and demolition waste, according to SUEZ.

SUEZ is currently preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the approval that will assess the likely impacts of the construction and operation of the project.

It will focus on topics including waste management, air quality, hazards and risks, noise and vibration, soil and water, traffic and transport, biodiversity, fire and incident management, visual amenity and heritage.

The EIS is expected to be put on public display for comment in late 2018 or early 2019 by the Department of Planning and Environment.

Approval from the Sydney Western City Planning Panel is required following this step before SUEZ can proceed with construction.

Project approval is expected to be decided by mid 2019 with construction aimed to begin in late 2019.