Melbourne to award waste minimisation grants

The City of Melbourne’s Small Business and Social Enterprise Grants are this year offering an extra $100,000 to businesses with a waste minimisation proposal.

The funding is part of council’s plan to transition to a 90 per cent waste diversion rate, under the Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy 2030.

Lord Mayor Sally Capp said the grants have a long history of helping local businesses grow into well-known brands, including Keep Cup, which was awarded funding in 2008.

“We’re incredibly proud that past recipients of these grants have gone on to enjoy huge success, while also contributing to our city’s rich and diverse hospitality, innovation, sustainability and tourism sectors,” Ms Capp said.

Round one was awarded earlier this week, with Small Business Chair Susan Riley announcing Unpackaged Eco as among the recipients.

“There’s a huge variety of grant recipients this year for businesses doing amazing things. Helping the environment is Unpackaged Eco which uses smart technology to reduce packing in retail.”

Waste minimisation funding will be available in round two of the program, which opens 5 August.

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ACOR backs Labor’s waste minimisation policy

Labor’s proposed $290 million waste minimisation policy has received support from the Australian Council of Recycling (ACOR).

ACOR CEO Pete Shmigel said the proposal was a bold boost for recycling and remanufacturing in Australia.

The policy calls for a national ban on single use-plastic bags and microbeads from 2021 and outlines the creation of a National Container Deposit Scheme.

Labor leader Bill Shorten said he will consult with states, territories and industry on how to best implement the proposals.

“This will create a consistent approach across the country – following moves of many state and territories to phase out single-use plastic bags, as well as manufacturers phasing out microbeads,” Mr Shorten said.

Mr Shorten also announced the establishment of a National Waste Commissioner, a $60 million National Recycling Fund and a $15 million investment to assist nearby counties clean up the pacific ocean.

Mr Shmigel said independent modelling commissioned by ACOR shows Labor’s policy has the potential to divert millions of tonnes from landfill to recycling, create 300 new jobs in regional Australia and reduce greenhouse gases.

“The initiative will lift Australia from its 17th position in the world in terms of recycling rates and let us grow the sector from the current 50,000 jobs.”

Mr Shmigel said the policy’s direct investment in infrastructure to decontaminate recycling, building of home-grown markets and expedition of product stewardship schemes were particularly significant.

“It speaks to the 88 per cent of Australians who told a recent survey they want a more pro-active recycling policy,” Mr Shmigel said.

Director of the Boomerang Alliance Jeff Angel said the policy doesn’t go far enough however, stressing the need for ‘buy recycled’ tax incentives and mandatory rules for recycled content in products.

‘’An important piece of the puzzle is mandatory rules for recycled content in products. This needs to extend beyond government to the private sector. It’s the only way to cement reprocessing of waste into the economy and save resources and the environment. Anything less is fiddling at the edges.

‘’The introduction of a plastic pollution reduction strategy to set a future direction to reduce single use plastics wasted or littered should have been included,” Mr Angel said.

“The public and many industry sectors recognise that packaging is a significant problem, but the problem includes all single use and disposable plastic waste.’’

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EPA TAS opens waste minimisation for Sustainability Award

The Environment Protection Authority (EPA) Tasmania has opened nominations to the 2018 Community Achievement awards.

The EPA Sustainability Award acknowledges businesses from any industry sector who have developed and implemented initiative that minimise waste, maximise resource efficiency, reduce pollution and conserve water and energy.

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Submissions should be a for a project that provides measurable improvements in waste minimisation, resource efficiency, water conservation or energy efficiency and results in wider community or flow on benefits for the sector.

Nominations are now open for the following categories:

  • EPA Sustainability Award
  • University of Tasmania Teaching Excellence Award
  • Ricoh Business Centre Hobart Community Group of the Year Award
  • Prime Super Business Achievement Award
  • Prime Super Employer Excellence in Aged Care Award
  • MAIB Disability Achievement Award
  • Get Moving Tasmania Physical Activity Award
  • Fonterra Australia Agriculture Award
  • Betta Milk ‘Make It Betta’ Health Achievement Award
  • Rural Health Tasmania Innovation in Mental, Social and Emotional Wellbeing Award

Nominations can be submitted here, and close on Thursday 23 August.

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Eugene Tay talks about ZeroWasteSG
As the Singapore Government has set strict targets for recycling by 2030, ZeroWaste SG is supporting its aims with a range of initiatives to encourage citizens to reduce, reuse and recycle their waste streams.

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