Solid waste market to exceed $340B by 2024

The global solid waste management market is expected to exceed USD 340 billion (AUD452.8) by 2024, according to a new research report from market research firm Global Market Insights Inc.

According to the report, the solid waste management industry has been growing significantly in terms of remuneration, due in part to increasingly stringent regulatory norms and guidelines.

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The European market is also set to grow exponentially as countries like the UK and Germany adopt new recycling technologies and introduce comprehensive directives to lower air pollution and land usage, according to the report.

It estimates the UK solid waste management industry size will surpass a total processing capacity of over 35 million tonnes by 2024.

The region also has been characterised by the interest in waste to energy (WtE) facilities being set up, the report said. Hitachi Zosen Inova AG has also announded recently to build Turkey’s first WtE plant – planned to be the largest WtE project in Europe with the capacity to process 15 per cent of Istanbul’s solid waste per year.

The report also says that companies like Biffa Group, Hitachi, Veolia, Amec Foster Wheeler, E.L. Harvey & Sons, and Stericycle have been focusing on acquiring upcoming companies to fortify their presence in the industry.

Ipswich Council change stance on recycling

UPDATE: Ipswich City Council has reversed its decision to send stop recycling household waste.

Ipswich Mayor Andrew Antoniolli told ABC News the council was looking to utilise a provision in the Local Government Act which would allow the employment of a short-term recycling contract.

“We have been upfront with the people of Ipswich, and we have proudly sparked a national debate on council waste management practice. This is an issue of global significance, and our position is strong,” he told ABC News.

“The existing methodologies of recycling are not working — they’re short-term, they’re not sustainable — we need some long-term strategies.”

Cr Antoniolli said the council would run a campaign to better educate residents about what can and can’t be recycled.

“The cost is not the issue — the issue is contamination,” he told ABC News.

“If we can’t meet a certain level of contamination, they won’t accept it — it’ll go to landfill.

“At present there are quite simply too many pizza boxes, plastic bags, burger wrappers and other items not fit for recycling.”


ORIGINAL STORY BELOW:

Ipswich City Council has announced all contents from household recycling waste will be sent to landfill.

The council also aims to focus its efforts on green energy and intends to call tenders to bid on waste to energy projects by mid 2018.

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The move comes in response to the recycling price surge nationwide. Ipswich City Council said recycling contractors notified the council that the current rate being paid to them would skyrocket if recycling was to continue in the order of $2 million per year, which could potentially lead to a 1.5 to 2 per cent rate rise.

Additionally, the current contamination levels in the city’s recycling was said to be unacceptably high, according to the council, which said about half of everything collected from household recycling bins was not able to be recycled.

Ipswich Mayor Andrew Antoniolli said Ipswich was the latest domino to be affected by a nationwide issue – one which required a three-tier government solution.

“As a city, we need to move forward,” Cr Antoniolli said.

“We want to become a leader in the waste-to-energy space, which will in the medium to long-term provide us with an environmentally-friendly energy source, jobs and a better economic outcome for Ipswich.

“We’ve actually been looking at waste as an energy source for some time, and this gives us the ideal opportunity to be ahead of the game in that space.”

Deputy Mayor Wayne Wendt said the move is a fundamental shift in how we as a community think about waste.

“The focus on recycling will now be very much about waste reduction. Everybody plays a role in the protection of our environment, and ways to reduce waste now become even more important to our daily lives,” Cr Wendt said.

“Under the current and previous rates of contamination waste experts advise it would be almost unachievable even with the best and well-intentioned community education program to lower the rate of contamination to acceptable levels.

“In a nutshell, this means we were left with no other choice but to send yellow lid bin contents to landfill. Importantly, it is worth repeating that this does not change the way household rubbish is collected. There will still be the same number of trucks, the same number of staff, and we anticipate a similar level of waste,” he said.

Ipswich City Council is advising residents to continue sorting their waste as normal and that green waste would continue to be recycled.

Waste to Energy project at NSW abattoir

ReNu Energy has been provided with $2 million to design, construct, own and operate a waste to energy facility at a NSW abattoir.

The Federal Government and Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) has invested to assist the creation of the new biogas facility at Southern Meats’ abattoir in Goulburn.

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The $5.75 million project includes construction of a covered lagoon for anaerobic digestion to produce biogas from breaking down effluent.

It is estimated to produce 3800 megawatt hours of electricity per year by treating and transferring biogas to two 800-kilowatt dual fuel generators.

The lagoon can store biogas which can be used during peak times of electricity consumption during manufacturing, with the additional generators able to contribute to reduce the amount of energy from the grid when prices spike during times of peak demand.

The abattoir uses around 20,000 kilowatt hours of electricity a day.

Minister for the Environment and Energy Josh Frydenberg said the conversion of waste into energy is an innovative way to help combat the challenges associated with waste management and energy prices.

“Disposing abattoir waste is a major environmental challenge and processing and storing meat is an energy intensive business,” Mr Frydenberg said.

“That’s why this project is win-win, it helps reduce the need to dispose of waste from the abattoir and it provides Southern Meats with a more affordable source of energy,” he said.

WA City of Cockburn accept waste supply tender

The City of Cockburn has accepted a tender to supply its general waste to HZI consortium’s waste to energy (WtE) plant for the next 20 years.

The deal will begin from 2021 and will be processed at a proposed facility WtE in East Rockingham, WA.

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Under the agreement, waste will be delivered from kerbside collection to the plant at an estimated cost of $3.47 million for the first year.

This represents a considerable cost saving on the current arrangements for waste disposal, according to the City of Cockburn.

The Eastern Metropolitan Regional Council has accepted the consortium as the preferred waste disposal tenderer.

Moving grate combustion technology is planned to convert energy from general waste and turn it into electricity, while also producing ash by-products that could potentially be used in road construction.

City of Cockburn Waste Manager Lyall Davieson said the waste supply agreement represented significant savings for ratepayers and would divert greater volumes of waste from landfill.

“Waste disposed at landfill attracts an ever-increasing state government landfill levy, which is currently $65 per tonne, but this levy does not apply to WtE,” Mr Davieson said.

“The state government has determined that no further landfills will be approved on the Swan Coastal Plain,” he said.

“When existing landfills reach capacity, the city, along with many other metropolitan local governments, will have to transport its general waste to regional or inland rural areas, a costly proposition that would also increase the city’s transport carbon emissions.

“The WtE process is environmentally favourable to landfill in that valuable materials are converted for energy production. There is also potential for the city to purchase the electricity produced by processing the waste.”

Mr Davieson said the initiative will build on the weekly recycling and green waste services provided by the city.

“Sending the city’s waste to the New Energy WtE facility will help the city reach an overall waste diversion rate from landfill of 85 per cent for all its household waste streams, well above the Waste Authority’s target,” Mr Davieson said.

HZI consortium sign 20-year waste to energy supply deal

A Hitachi Zosen Inova (HZI) led consortium has signed a 20-year agreement with the Eastern Metropolitan Regional Council (EMRC) for the supply of waste to the East Rockingham Recovery Facility.

Approximately 330,000 tonnes of waste are converted into renewable energy at the East Rockingham Resource Recovery Facility (RRF), producing 28 megawatts of electricity, enough to power 36,000 homes.

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HZI’s partners in the consortium include the New Energy Corporation and Tribe Infrastructure Group.

The project will set a benchmark in the Perth market for waste to energy projects in terms of flexibility and value and represents a $400 million private sector investment in the metro area.

Under the agreement, the EMRC’s participating councils will supply residual waste to the RRF and will only pay for capacity they use. This means councils that have successfully implemented landfill waste reduction schemes will receive no penalties.

This system favours a service provider model that supports higher order utilisation or recovery of waste resources instead of a take-or-pay structure which can lead to financial penalties if committed volumes are not met.

HZI will act as the technology provider, engineering and construction contractor and will execute long term operations and maintenance contract for the project.

The RRF will divert 95 per cent of the waste it receives from EMRC away from landfill.

New Energy Chairman Enzo Gullotti said he supports waste minimisation and composting should councils choose to do that.

“It’s an important part of our social licence to operate our RRF over the long term. We’ll deliver the EMRC the best possible environmental outcome for residual waste streams and certainty of price over the period of the contract. This presents a real opportunity to divert waste from landfill and deliver value for money to the ratepayers of the EMRC councils,” Mr Gullotti said.

“The EMRC should be commended for showing leadership in diverting waste from landfill. This signing represents the delivery of a strategic commitment the EMRC undertook back in 2000 in this regard. It’s not only a win for the environment but also for the member council ratepayers who are now insulated from the ever-increasing cost of landfilling, due at least in part to the state’s rising landfill levy,” he said.

The consortium currently working through the pre-engineering and update of the site environmental approval. The project is scheduled to begin construction in Q3 2018.

Victorian Government launches waste to energy discussion paper

The Victorian Government has released a discussion paper on waste to energy to support the development of new technologies, including anaerobic digestion and thermal treatment of waste.

Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Action Lily D’Ambrosio released the paper today during a visit to Shepparton, where she also announced five grants from the $2.38 million Waste to Energy Infrastructure Fund.

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The grants will help businesses and water corporations upgrade waste management practices and support projects that will deliver almost 1MW of renewable energy capacity per annum:

  • Western Region Water Corporation will receive $802,784 to collect organic waste material and generate energy
  • Diamond Valley Pork will receive $284,929 to install an anaerobic digester to improve waste management and generate energy and nutrient rich digestate
  • East Gippsland Region Water Corporation will receive $209,765 to enhance an existing bio-digester to process septic tank waste, food waste, fats, oils and greases
  • Nestle Australia will receive $182,510 to create a system where organic waste from starch based soft confectionery is used for bioenergy
  • Resource Resolution will receive $900,000 to help it build an anaerobic digester to divert local commercial food waste and other organics from landfill

The emissions saved through this program is equivalent to removing 16,500 cars from the road or the energy consumption of 7,000 homes.

The Waste to Energy Infrastructure Fund was announced in the 2016 State Budget as part of the Government’s Climate Change innovation and Jobs Initiative.

Feedback received on the discussion paper will help inform the Victorian Government’s development of a waste to energy policy, to be released in 2018.