Palfinger’s telescopic hookloaders

Palfinger’s hookloaders were designed for maximum payload and efficiency of operation.

The variety of models boast increased payloads and tipping capacity, low transport heights, hydraulic locking, an articulated arm, cab control and a range of other features. 

Palfinger is able to offer hookloaders to suit a desired application, from the telescoping loaders for different container lengths loading, to its telescopic A systems which offer an ability to handle shorter containers.

High-tensile steel reduces hookloader weight for maximised payloads while optimising the weight to increase truck longevity and reduce fuel costs. 

Low build and compact subframes enables reduced transport heights, with a low centre of gravity providing better and safer driving conditions. The loading of higher containers increases transported volume.

Palfinger’s telescopic hookloaders also work to reduce horizontal forces and increase tipping capacity. 

For increased safety, articulated arms allow very low loading angles and avoid load sliding, while offering under-roof and under-floor loading. Hydraulic locking secures the containers in the front while the crane operates, with tank containers or containers with hydraulic devices for very high and long containers. Cab controls are ergonomic and intuitive and offer magnetic fastening while thin cables facilitate cab control manipulation.

Hiab’s XR hooklift range

Hiab Australia has introduced a range of small hooklifts to meet the growing challenge of narrow access for operators while ensuring greater safety and efficiency.

The company is increasing its range of hooklifts and skip loaders to include the Multilift XXR R7 and Multilift XR10 Hooklifts (seven and 10 tonnes respectively). Its decades of experience in the European market are now being applied to meet the current challenges in Australia. 

The Hiab Multilift XR10 and XR7 range aims to carry bigger payloads and enable access in tight spaces, with the goal of boosting operator return on investment all while remaining strong, robust and light.

The Hiab Multilift XR7 with its seven-tonne lifting capacity and the Hiab Multilift XR10 with its 10-tonne lifting capacity works to offer operators maximum performance and excellent functionality. The equipment’s low weight combined with extreme strength makes it a multipurpose tool. 

As in all Hiab Multilift demountables, safety is a key priority in the XR series. Safety features include load-holding valves directly on the cylinders and a tipping lock mechanism.

Hiab also applied the latest 3D-CAD methods and modern production technology in the design and manufacturing of the XR range, which minimised the welding needed in construction and resulted in a stronger structure. The low weight/high strength ratio enables larger payloads, enhances the versatility of the vehicle and maximises its usage. 

Dobbing in dumpers

Waste Management Review investigates how the Victorian EPA and councils are tackling the multimillion-dollar issue of illegal dumping. Read more

ACT green bin roll-out brought forward

ACT Government City Services Chris Steel has announced the green waste bin roll-out for remaining Canberra suburbs, originally planned for mid-2019, has been brought forward to 1 April 2019 with registrations now open.

“The ACT Government has been working closely with the contractors to move the roll-out forward, responding to strong community demand for the service and ensuring delivery of a key election commitment,” Mr Steel said.

He said the government would continue to roll out better services that are expected by the community and work to reduce the amount of organic waste going into landfill.

Mr Steel said that registrations had now opened, with bin delivery from the start of March in readiness for collection services to commence from 1 April.

He said there are likely to be changes to green waste bin collection dates for existing service areas from April, once services start across the whole of the ACT.

According to the government, demand in the current service areas has been high, and as at the end of November 2018, a total of 40,384 residents in Belconnen, Tuggeranong and Weston Creek had registered for the bins, representing approximately 45 per cent of households in those areas.

Coca-Cola to ban straws

Coca-Cola Amatil has announced it will no longer distribute plastic drinking straws or stirrers in Australia and instead stock fully recyclable and biodegradable FSC-accredited (Forest Stewardship Council) paper straws.

Group managing director Alison Watkins said the decision was another step forward in the company’s efforts to reduce single-use plastics.

“We’re serious about playing our part in reducing unnecessary plastic packaging,” Ms Watkins said.

“We’ve heard the community message loud and clear that unnecessary packaging is unacceptable and we all need to work together to reduce the amount entering litter streams, the environment and the oceans.

“The new paper drinking straws will be sourced from suppliers BioPak and Austraw and made available through Amatil’s ordering platform to around 115,000 outlets nationwide including grocery, petrol and convenience stores, bars, cafes and quick service restaurants.”

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Distribution of the old single-use plastic drinking straws and stirrers will cease as stocks run out over the next two months.

The new sustainable paper straws will be available from February.

Ms Watkins said the intention was for 100 per cent of Coca Cola Amatil’s Australian packaging to be fully recyclable by 2025, including all bottles, cans, plastic wrap, straws, glass and cardboard.

“We are working towards phasing out unnecessary and problematic single-use plastics entirely, through improved design, innovation or the use of recycled alternatives,” Ms Watkins said.

Last year, Coca-Cola Amatil announced that by 2020 it would develop the business case for a weighted average of 50 per cent recycled plastic in PET containers across the Australian portfolio, including carbonated soft drinks.

The Coca-Cola Company is also developing sustainable packaging goals to increase the recycled content in plastic bottles, and supports recycling programs in Australia.

1200 tonnes removed in Numurkah tyre stockpile clean-up

About one quarter of a tyre stockpile in the Victorian town of Numurkah has been removed – equating to an estimated tonnes of 1200 tyres.

Environment Protection Authority Victoria (EPA) used its powers at the end of last year under the Environment Protection Act 1970 to enter the site, with the assistance of Moira Shire Council and funding from the Victorian Government.

Located in Victoria’s Goulburn Valley Highway, the stockpile on privately-owned land has a stockpile of an estimated 500,000 tyres.

EPA Victoria North East Region Manager Emma Knights said the disposal of the tyres was going well.

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“The project has been carefully planned, and the tyres removed so far have come from the sides of the stockpile where the hazards are most critical,” Ms Knights said.

“Aerial pictures taken by an EPA camera drone late last week show piles of waste tyres have been removed from the eastern side, closest to homes along the Goulburn Valley Highway. The southern side, which faces several business premises, is currently being removed,” she said.

The removal began in mid December with up to eight trucks a day leaving the site, five days a week, and the whole project is estimated to take approximately 10 weeks.

“The work is progressing well and we are on schedule, although the completion date will depend on the weather, including any days of total fire ban,” Ms Knights said.

The stockpile has been a concern to the community for some time.

“Tyre fires are notoriously difficult to extinguish and produce considerable amounts of toxic smoke. With an estimated 5000 tonnes of waste tyres at the site, CFA has already warned of serious consequences if a summer grass or bushfire spreads to the stockpile,” she said.

The clean-up was carefully planned to include fire safety, security and wildlife and vermin management. Firefighting equipment is located on site for the duration of the clean-up, and no snakes have been observed so far during tyre removal.

The waste tyres are going to a licensed facility in Melbourne for recycling. Once they have been shredded, waste tyres can be put to use in the construction, manufacturing and automotive industries, in the form of products such as athletics tracks, brake pads, new tyres or road surfacing.