Waste Strategy Summit 2019

The Waste Strategy Summit 2019 will be held in Sydney at the Aerial UTS Function Centre 25-27 June.

The summit is designed for executives working within waste management, recycling, resource recovery, and environmental sustainability across all sectors in Australia, who are looking to improve their waste management operations.

The event will explore the waste hierarchy, with diverse keynote presentations and case studies illustrating how to prevent, recycle and recover the most common waste with a strong focus on policy and regulation.

Keynote speakers include Queensland Resource Recovery Program Manager of Waste Policy Sylvie Garner, Big W General Manager Supply Chain Anthony Castaldi and NSW EPA China National Sword Director Justin Koek.

The summit includes pre-conference workshops and two full days of conference sessions.

The Waste Strategy Summit is committed to a zero-waste to landfill objective for the event.

Waste Management Review readers will receive a 10 per cent discount off the registration fee — quote ‘WMR10’ at online registration.

For more information click here.

Budget allocates $3.8 billion to Department of Environment

Last night’s federal budget announcement saw $3.8 billion allocated to the Department of the Environment and Energy.

From the allocation, $3.5 billion will go towards the Climate Solutions Package, while $100 million will be channelled into the Environment Restoration Fund.

Environment Minister Melissa Price said funding for the Climate Solutions Package would be used to ensure the government meets its Paris commitment, reducing emissions by 26-28 per cent by 2030.

According to Ms Price, $2.0 billion will go towards the Climate Solutions Fund, which is expected to reduce emissions by more than 100 million tonnes.

The Climate Solutions Fund will build upon the previous Emissions Reduction Fund, which saw landfill operators earn carbon credits through the conversion of methane to energy and carbon dioxide.

When organic matter in landfill waste decomposes it releases methane, which if not collected enters the atmosphere. Carbon credits therefore work to incentives investment in gas to energy initiatives.

The Environment Restoration Fund is designed to support local councils and state governments deliver projects to protect and remediate Australia’s environment.

Ms Price said the funds $100 million allocation will be used to support practical action on waste and recycling.

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Yume and REMONDIS working together to reduce food waste

Yume, an online business to business marketplace for the sale of surplus food, is working with water and environmental services company REMONDIS to sell excess food and reduce waste.

REMONDIS will use Yume’s marketplace to assist customers in selling their surplus products, reducing waste disposal costs and delivering better environmental outcomes.

REMONDIS General Manager for Integrated and Managed Services Nathan Radley said working with Yume allows the company to expand its services on the waste value chain.

“Yume is a great way to access the first two stages of the food waste hierarchy, avoid and reuse, before we move onto recycling, waste to energy and ultimately disposal,” Mr Radley said.

REMONDIS recently listed 13.8 tonnes of maple syrup on Yume, sourced from a customer with excess stock.

“The product was quickly snapped up on Yume, providing a significant return to the customer while saving 952,000 litres of water and preventing the release of 27,600 kilograms of CO2 into the atmosphere,” Mr Radley said.

Yume founder Katy Barfield said through connecting suppliers to buyers, the company helps reduce the 4.1 million tonnes of food waste sent to landfill in Australia each year.

“Yume has already sold over 813,000 kilograms of quality surplus food, returning $2.6 million to Australian farmers and manufacturers.

“In doing so, Yume has saved 56,112 million litres of water and prevented 1,626 tonnes of carbon dioxide from being released,” Ms Barfield said.

At the 2018 Victorian Premier’s Sustainability Awards, Yume was recognised for its efforts towards reducing waste and landfill impact — winning the Premier’s Recognition Award, the Innovative Products or Services award, and the Small and Medium Enterprises award.

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Downer and Adelaide deliver Australia’s first recycled road

In an Australian-first, the City of Adelaide has partnered with Downer to construct Australia’s first road made completely from recycled material.

The recycled road is made up of reclaimed asphalt pavement from local streets and recycled vegetable oil.

The asphalt mix was processed through Downer’s asphalt plant in Wingfield, before being laid on Chatham Street in the city’s south west.

Downer’s General Manager Pavements, Stuart Billing, said the event demonstrates the importance of partnerships.

“Together with City of Adelaide, we have set a new benchmark in achieving sustainable solutions, The 100 percent recycled road saves up to 65 percent CO2e emissions when mixed at a lower temperature (warm mix asphalt), compared to standard asphalt made with virgin materials,” he said.

“Our Australian-first 100 percent recycled asphalt is about 25 percent stronger than standard asphalt, which means it will be able to better resist deformation.”

Lord Mayor Sandy Verschoor said the demonstration aligns with the councils ambition to becoming a leading green, liveable and creative city.

“The project originates from a Motion on Notice brought to Council last year, which asked the administration to seek to maximise the amount of recycled material used within our roads,” she said.

“At around the same cost as the standard process, the recycled road is cost-effective and, as we’re recycling our own materials, it has a great benefit to the environment.”

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Indonesia announces 100 per cent paper inspection rate

As of 1 April, all scrap paper imported to Indonesia must be inspected prior to shipment, according to a letter sent to exporters by Indonesian inspection agency Sucofindo.

Head of Sucofindo Andre Esfandiari said Indonesian Customs found discrepancies in scrap paper imports at the Tanjung Emas Surabaya port— causing them to declare the previous inspection standard of 10 per cent unacceptable.

In addition, two per cent of total shipment bales will be inspected to ensure imports meet the maximum impurity limit of 0.5 per cent.

A 100 per cent inspection rate already applies to steel and plastic scrap.

The decision follows similar restrictions in China and India, with China announcing plans to eliminate solid waste imports by 2020 and India banning solid plastic imports entirely.

According to the 2018 National Waste Report, Indonesia is Australia’s second-largest waste destination, taking 19 per cent of total waste exports.

New regulations will remain in place until the Ministry of Trade releases formal technical guidelines.

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National Clean Technologies Conference & Exhibition

The new National Clean Technologies Conference & Exhibition (NCTCE) will be held on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast at the Event’s Center 29-31 May.

The nationally focused event will cover multiple clean technology growth areas including, energy, waste, water, built environment and transport.

The event, themed Creating Connections: Building Business, aims to play an important role in bringing together key stakeholders across the industry to drive growth, innovation and investment. It also offers an opportunity for the clean technology industry to collaborate, be inspired, find opportunity and do business.

Attendees will hear from international and national leaders from the clean technology industry with real world experience, discover new technology, explore how we can create healthy, resilient and sustainable places, find out how regional Australia can take advantage of the rapidly growing sector and learn about commercialising and deploying new clean technology innovations and develop successful partnerships.

The program will focus heavily on commercialisation, creating effective business clusters, the potential of the circular economy, innovation case studies and success stories, investment and funding channels.

The NCTCE will feature 250 delegates, 40 exhibitors and 55 speakers, including Deputy Lord Mayor of Melbourne Arron Wood, Veolia Sustainable Solutions Manager Angela Cooney and European Cluster Manager of the Year Bianca Dragmir.

The program includes local study tours, workshops and two full days of conference sessions.

For more information click here.

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