Sustainability allies: Veolia

Waste education, awareness and engagement are taking centre stage at major sporting events, as Veolia takes its relationships with stakeholders to new heights.

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Volvo releases new low entry cab

More than 67 per cent of Australians live in a capital city, which brings unique challenges to the transport task.

One of the biggest challenges is how to deliver goods and services safely, efficiently and with the least impact to the environment.

According to Volvo Trucks Australia Vice President Tony O’Connell, Volvo is attempting to meet this challenge with the launch of the Volvo FE Low Entry Cab (LEC).

“Providing excellent ergonomics for the driver as well as superior all-round visibility, the low vantage point of the FE LEC also helps keep vulnerable road users and pedestrians safe,” Mr O’Connell said.

“The Volvo FE LEC is literally a walk up start for applications where the driver leaves the cab multiple times during a shift.”

Mr O’Connell said the lower step minimises the chance of a driver tripping or missing a step when entering or exiting the vehicle.

“A versatile cab configuration means that the FE LEC can be specified with up to four seats and flat cross cab access, or a more traditional two seat layout with an internal instep,” Mr O’Connell said.

“This new truck has class leading driver visibility and improved driver ergonomics, and most importantly, the FE LEC features Volvo Trucks world-class safety and technological innovations, including emergency braking as standard.”

Mr O’Connell said the flexible platform targets the waste sector, however its low profile also makes it useful for multi-drop urban distribution.

“Volvo Trucks has placed urban emissions high on the agenda, and the FE LEC utilises a Euro 6 compliant eight-litre up to 350hp diesel engine to deliver clean, frugal power to the road,” Mr O’Connell said.

“This truck is also equipped with Volvo’s class leading I-Shift automated transmission or a traditional automatic 6-speed with torque converter.”

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Veolia takes over Greater Shepparton waste services

Veolia Environmental Services will undertake Greater Shepparton kerbside waste collections, after council agreed the current contractor, Wheelie Waste, could novate their contract.

According to Greater Shepparton City Council Infrastructure Director Phil Hoare, Veolia will take over all of Wheelie Waste’s Shepparton operations including its commercial transfer station and waste management fleet.

“Residents can be assured it is business as usual and there will be no disruptions to kerbside bin collections,” Mr Hoare said.

“Veolia will be picking up the red, yellow and green lid bins as usual – the only change residents will notice is the branding on the trucks.”

Mr Hoare said all current local Wheelie Waste employees will transfer to Veolia.

Veolia Group General Manager for Victoria Anthony Roderick said the decision allowed Veolia to expand their operations in the Greater Shepparton region.

“This is an exciting opportunity for Veolia as we build capability in northern Victoria and add further value to customers through fleet expansion and route optimisation,” Mr Roderick said.

“Planned and ongoing services, including the kerbside collection services will continue as normal.”

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How Australian Earth helps businesses succeed

Australian Earth Director Scott Lidster explains the secrets to a successful waste operation through tailored machine application and operator training.

Did you know fuel burn and machine downtime are the top two costs to your landfill operations? Would you like to reduce your operating and owning costs and improve your productivity?

Australian Earth is a niche operator training business active in the mining, construction, quarry and waste handling industries. It offers comprehensive operator training packages, from entry level to advanced operator training (Level 1, 2 and 3).

Our aim is to collaborate with our customers to help unlock productivity and efficiency opportunities through engaging their operators in industry recognised best practice operating techniques and applying machine technology safely.

We believe that the secret to an operations success is having a sustainable approach to how their machines are being utilised. We help by change the culture by the way of educating your operators that they can have a direct, positive effect to operating costs, machine uptime and execution.

Additional value that Australian Earth provides is: an increase in machine mean time between failure occurrences, improved machine availability and a reduction of variation in operator performance. All will help our customers lower their owning and operating costs.

Australian Earths services include:

— New machine familiarisation training at delivery. These include daily inspection requirements, cabin and control family and safe operation.

— New to industry operator trainees (Level 1)

— Training of operators at customer request (Level 2). Expected result is the training of participants in structured learning experiences and compliance to site standards and OEM recommendations.

— Application Training for operators (Level 3). Train customer operators in how to maximise machine performance to suit their application.

— Development of content for competency-based training programs.

— Demonstration of equipment to assist with sales process as requested.

— Conduct site supervisor training. The aim of this training is for supervisors to gain a base level understanding of a machine capabilities and what to look for in operator performance.

— Conduct “train the trainer” training.

— Demonstrated ability to conduct face-to-face training for small groups or one on one.

New WA Waste Authority board

Western Australian Environment Minister Stephen Dawson has announced a new five-member Waste Authority board.

The board is tasked with guiding the Waste Authority’s implementation of the Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Strategy 2030, while driving key programs and offering advice to Mr Dawson.

Former WA Chamber of Minerals and Energy CEO Reg Howard-Smith has been appointed Waste Authority chairperson, while Workpower CEO Lee Broomhall has been appointed deputy chairperson.

“There was an extremely strong field of applicants, so I’m pleased to welcome the team of people who will help realise the state government’s vision to reuse or recycle at least 75 per cent of waste generated in WA by 2030,” Mr Dawson said.

“I look forward to working with these five talented people, who bring a wide range of experience to this board – including shaping strategic direction and policy, urban sustainability, project and waste management and exposure to the local government and planning sectors.”

Bloodwood Tree Association CEO Kelly Howlett, Southern Metropolitan Regional Council CEO Tim Youé and Josh Byrne & Associates Director Joshua Byrne have been appointed board members.

“I would like to thank outgoing chairperson Marcus Geisler, who has played an instrumental role on the board since 2008, outgoing deputy chairperson Jenny Bloom and the other outgoing members Victoria Bond, Neil Foley and Glen McLeod,” Mr Dawson said.

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WRIQ announces 2019 industry awards finalists

The Waste Recycling Industry Association QLD (WRIQ) has announced category finalists for the WRIQ 2019 Industry Awards.

WRIQ CEO Rick Ralph said the awards aim to recognise individuals and projects that contribute to Queensland’s waste management and resource recovery sector.

“The individuals and teams selected as finalists have demonstrated not only a high level of proficiency at their jobs, but also their dedication and commitment to improving and developing Queensland’s essential waste management and resource recovery industry,” Mr Ralph said.

“I thank all those who nominated for this year’s awards for their contribution to the industry and congratulate all deserving finalists.”

Winners will be announced at a gala dinner 19 July at the Brisbane Hilton.

Finalists:

Administrator of the year: SoilCyclers Sarah Armstrong, Raw Metal Corp Steffanie-Jo Kelly and Kanga Bins Tiffany Lim.

Maintenance employee of the year: Suez Randall Mckey, Westrex Services Jason Noble and BMI Group Andrew Russell.

Plant and equipment operator of the year: Cleanaway Cyril Ballard and Suez Kane Pym, Marlyn Compost Andrew Russell.

Trainee or apprentice of the year: Cleanaway Taryn Batt, Suez Dwayne Brown and Sims Metal Management Whitney Simpson.

Driver of the year: Raw Metal Corp Gary Arnold, SUEZ Recycling and Recovery Antony Francis and Cleanaway Paul O’Hara.

Resource recovery employee of the year: Veolia Gary Applegate, SoilCyclers Simon Brakels and BMI Group Corey Michael.

Collaborative achievement in resource recovery: Cleanaway container refund scheme project implementation, Coastal Skip Bin Hire “Recycling Solutions” and Kanga Bins container refund and ART machine installation.

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Cleanaway opens new Melbourne depot

Cleanaway CEO Vik Bansal has officially opened the company’s new Perry Road Office and Collections Depot in Dandenong South.

The 53,000 square meter depot will house Cleanaway’s business and operational teams including the Victoria Post Collections leadership team, the commercial, industrial and municipal collections’ business, sales, administration, finance and fleet teams.

According to a Cleanaway news statement, the site features a 20-bay workshop facility designed for vehicle compliance and fleet productivity, with paved parking areas for 164 collection vehicles and the new electric vehicle fleet.

“The site is also equipped with fuelling stations with 100,000 litre capacity and automatic truck and parts washing bays,” the statement reads.

“Bringing together our administrative and operational teams from across Greater Melbourne is a key step forward to serving our customers better and making a sustainable future possible for communities across Australia.”

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EPA Victoria orders recycler to stop accepting material

The Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Group (MWRRG) is initiating a range of measures to support councils, following a EPA Victoria notice that SKM Services stop accepting recyclable material at its Laverton North site.

EPA issued the recycler with notices on 19 June that required it bring outdoor stockpiles at Maffra Street, Coolaroo and Laverton North into compliance with the Victorian Waste Management Policy by 3 July 2019.

An EPA media statement said regulatory action followed an inspection that revealed waste on site had increased following an extension of time for compliance.

Additionally, a fire broke out at the Laverton North site 9 July that EPA believes began on a conveyor belt.

“EPA is of the opinion that SKM understood its obligations under the notices, but had not demonstrated a move towards achieving compliance at the Laverton North site,” the statement reads.

“The company will still be able to process waste at its Laverton North site while the notice is in place, but will not be able to receive any new materials until EPA is satisfied that it has achieved compliance with the Victorian Waste Management Policy.”

MWRRG is seeking confirmation from SKM that it has alternative provisions in place to ensure it can continue to provide service to up to 10 affected local councils.

MWRRG CEO Rob Millard said MWRRG’s focus is on ensuring minimal disruption to residents by working with affected councils, other recycling facilities and landfill operators on immediate and long-term solutions.

“Following China’s decision to limit the importation of recyclables, MWRRG has been developing collaborative procurements for recycling services, working with 11 council clusters comprising more than 60 councils across the state,” Mr Millard said.

“By councils working together, larger contracts will be offered in the industry to encourage investment in recycling infrastructure and technology, and to attract new candidates to the Victorian recycling sector.”

Mr Millard said industry would be asked to provide expressions of interest on the collaborative procurements in August, with detailed submissions expected by the end of the year.

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City of Bayside uses recycled asphalt

Dozens of streets in Melbourne’s City of Bayside are using recycled asphalt in the council’s latest maintenance resurfacing project.

To complete the project, Alex Fraser is repaving residential streets throughout the suburbs of Black Rock, Brighton, Highett and Hampton with high-quality asphalt products including volumes of recycled materials.

The project utilised more than 12,000 tonnes of sustainable asphalt, including Green Roads PolyPave – a high performance asphalt product containing recycled materials, comprising HDPE plastic, glass and RAP (Recycled Asphalt Pavement).

In doing so, Bayside has reduced waste to landfill by almost 4000 tonnes and carbon emissions by more than 21,606 kilograms.

Bayside roads have reused more than 100,000 two-litre milk bottles and 3.4 million glass bottles – equivalent to 9188 wheelie bins of waste glass and plastic, or the annual kerbside recycling for 350 households.

Bayside Mayor Cr Michael Heffernan said Bayside was ramping up its use of recycled materials in road construction as part of its pledge to greater environmental sustainability.

“We are committed to becoming more sustainable in every aspect of our operations and Green Roads are a great reflection of this commitment. Our residents can be confident that the recycling in their kerbside recycling bins can have a new life as the roads we drive and ride on,” he said.

Alex Fraser Managing Director Peter Murphy said this was a standout example of how a local community can play an active and important role in the state’s circular economy.

“Local governments’ role in recycling goes far beyond kerbside collection. Bayside City Council provides an excellent illustration of how local communities can maximise returns from resource recovery. By choosing to invest in recycled resources, Bayside has made significant commercial savings and reduced the carbon footprint of their project by around 65 per cent,” Mr Murphy said.

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The suburbs:
Black Rock
Brighton
Brighton East
Highett
Hampton
Beaumaris
Hampton Street

QLD releases energy from waste policy

The public is being invited to comment on the Queensland Government’s Energy-from-Waste policy discussion paper, released earlier this week.

Environment Minister Leeanne Enoch said finding alternative uses for waste was becoming more important than ever.

“The discussion paper is giving Queenslanders a chance to contribute to the development of a new policy, provide feedback on the types of technologies and help us plan for the future,” Ms Enoch said.

“The paper is an important action under the government’s new waste strategy.”

Ms Enoch said the government’s waste strategy outlined priorities and actions to help grow the recycling and resource recovery sector.

“We have set ambitious targets to recover 90 per cent of the waste we generate by 2050 and recycle at least 75 per cent of that waste,” Ms Enoch said.

“But we acknowledge that some wastes cannot be recycled, and it is better to retain the value of these wastes by recovering energy than it is to dispose of them to landfill. This is all part of our broader transition to a circular economy.”

Waste Recycling Industry Queensland (WRIQ) Executive Officer Rick Ralph said WRIQ and its members welcomed the new waste strategy.

“Energy from waste will play an important role in helping to achieve the objectives and targets of the strategy,” Mr Ralph said.

“The release of the Energy-from-Waste discussion paper is a step in the right direction. Industry looks forward to having this discussion with the government in this important initiative.”

Waste Management and Resource Recovery Association of Australia (WMRR) CEO Gayle Sloan said energy from waste was a vital part of a sustainable waste and resource recovery system.

“Its technologies are also proven globally, with more than 2000 energy from waste facilities operating safely across the US, Europe, Asia, and the Middle East, many having operated for decades,” Ms Sloan said.

“We look forward to working with the Queensland Government to leverage the technical expertise of our industry to develop a policy that promotes investment in, and growth of, an integrated waste management and resource recovery system that includes energy from waste.”

Public consultation is open until 26 August.

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