VWMA CDS discussion dinner

The Victorian Waste Management Association (VWMA) is hosting a dinner on 23 October, where attendees will hear from industry experts about container deposit scheme (CDS) implementation and results.

VWMA Executive Officer Mark Smith said the event will examine what Victoria and Tasmania can learn from CDS roll outs in NSW, ACT, QLD, WA and SA.

Mr Smith said New Zealand is also in the process of implementing its own national scheme.

“CDS’s aim to reduce the amount of beverage container litter and increase the amount of recycling through financial incentives,” Mr Smith said.

“However, not all schemes and rollouts workout to be the the same. What can Victoria and Tasmania learn from the States leading on this front?”

Mr Smith said the event, which is part of Waste Expo Australia, is open to all attendees and anyone interested in the topic of CDS’s.

“In addition to a scrumptious dinner and drinks, we’ve organised experts to present on a state by state comparison of CDS, and an overview of what happens with the cashflow of these schemes,” Mr Smith said.

“Big thanks to event sponsors MRA Consulting Group and RSM Group for making this event possible.”

For more information click here.

NCTCE opens call for speakers

The National Cleantech Conference & Exhibition (NCTCE) is calling for industry experts, researchers, non-government and government organisations and consortiums to participate in its 2020 speaker program.

NCTCE provides a national platform for collaboration, learning, networking and business between innovators, investors, producers and commercial end-users of clean technology.

An NCTCE spokesperson said the program covers all sectors including water, energy, waste, transport, agriculture, manufacturing and the built environment.

“The NCTCE, the only multi-sector Cleantech event in Australia, is seeking contributions from various disciplines, skills, knowledge bases and experience,” the spokesperson said.

“Do you have a new solution to announce, project success to feature or company case study to share with the Australian Cleantech Industry community?”

According to the spokesperson, industry experts such as Veena Sahajwalla and Arron Wood are already confirmed to speak.

“The theme for 2020 will be Cleantech: fast tracking sustainable growth, and focus on the opportunities for the Cleantech industry as an instigator of innovation, economic development, creative collaborations and inclusive prosperity,” the spokesperson said.

NCTCE will run 3 to 4 August 2020 at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre.

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Melbourne opens waste reduction grants

The City of Melbourne is offering grants worth $100,000 to projects aimed at waste reduction and growth in recycling capacity.

According to Lord Mayor Sally Capp, the City of Melbourne has this week reached an agreement to resume the processing of household recycling.

“The short-term arrangement to process household recycling was reached while Kordamentha seeks to finalise the sale of SKM,” Ms Capp said.

“We urge the community to continue separating their waste and recycling. It’s vital that general waste not be mixed in with recycling to ensure recycling services are sustainable and viable.”

To aid the transition, grants are available to groups located in the City of Melbourne that help reuse, recycle and divert waste from landfill.

“We’re looking for projects that could help reduce food waste, prevent litter or deliver local solutions to household waste,” Ms Capp said.

Grants up to $5000 are available for community groups, schools and non-profit organisations, while social enterprise startups and university researchers can accesses grants up to $25,000.

City of Melbourne Environment portfolio Chair Cathy Oke said it was important for council to support residents and community groups that are trying to avoid waste.

“Residents and businesses are overwhelmingly telling us they want reduce their environmental impact, and we want to respond to their goodwill,” Ms Oke said.

“Whether it’s home composting and using worm farms to reduce organic waste, or coming up with a solution for glass recycling, we can all have an impact.”

Applications close 16 October 2019.

Grants available for bioenergy infrastructure

Grants worth $750,000 are now available to support bioenergy infrastructure projects, as part of Sustainability Victoria’s Bioenergy Infrastructure Fund.

The Bioenergy Infrastructure Fund is open to industry, social enterprises, community groups and government entities working on bioenergy technology that will increase sustainable energy production and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Sustainability Victoria Interim CEO Carl Muller said the grants are aimed at projects that will boost the collection and reuse of organics across the state.

“Victoria’s commercial and industrial sector generates more than 900,000 tonnes of organic waste every year, with over a quarter of that being food, and around ten per cent is recovered,” Mr Muller said.

“There is great potential for increased recovery of organics as a valuable fuel source, while reducing greenhouse gas emissions.”

Previously funded projects include the Western Region Water Corporation, which received $802,784 to collect food waste and generate energy, and the East Gippsland Region Water Corporation, which received $209,765 to enhance an existing bio-digester to process septic tank waste, food waste, fats, oils and greases.

“Bioenergy can play an important role in the mix of renewable energy, supporting not only our transition towards a renewable energy generation network but also a circular economy,” Mr Muller said.

Proposals are open for bioenergy infrastructure or feasibility and technical studies.

Grant applications close 28 October 2019.

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Landfill loading: Caterpillar

Caterpillar Asia Pacific explains how differential locks and Cat Connect technology can increase landfill operation efficiency.

Not all landfill sites are the same, with many posing unique and harsh environmental challenges for operators. Land is often unlevel, with small space for movement and barriers to reach cells.

In these environments, managing multiple seemingly competing requirements such as maximising operational efficiency, economic viability and worker safety, can be a challenge.

Ayden Piri, Caterpillar (Cat) Asia Pacific Industry Specialist Account Manager, says landfill operators require reliable and efficient machinery to facilitate safe site management and consistent operations.

He says Cat is uniquely positioned to understand machinery requirements relevant to the waste industry, with over 40 years experience providing for the sector in multiple application modes.

According to Ayden, Cat M Series waste handling wheel loaders are popular with landfill operators due to their heavy-duty handling capacity.

“Cat’s waste handling wheel loaders deliver sustainable productivity, fuel efficiency, ease of serviceability, ergonomics and operator comfort,” Ayden says.

“These environmentally-friendly front end loader machines apply proven technology systematically and strategically, to meet our customer’s high expectations.”

With a global network of 172 dealers, factories in 30 countries and more than 10,000 Cat and dealer employees in Australia and New Zealand, the extensive reach ensures CAT is able to draw on a network of experts to solve its customers’ challenges.

Ayden says M series 950- and 972-metre models have a standard front axle differential lock, which is manually activated by a switch on the cab floor.

The fully automatic front and rear axle differential locks work by measuring differences in axle speeds and require no operator intervention to activate.

“These disc-type differential locks will reduce tyre scuffing compared to other traction aids, further reducing operating costs for customers,” Ayden says.

“The proven Z-bar linkage combines efficiency with great visibility to the tool, resulting in excellent penetration into the pile, high breakout forces and superior production capabilities.”

M Series’ next generation ride control works as a shock absorber, which Ayden says improves ride quality and smoothness over the rough surfaces often found in transfer stations.

“When paired with the Fusion coupler, from a loaded high-dump bucket to a fork to move material, the ride control system provides reduced cycle times, better productivity and a smoother, more comfortable ride for the operator,” he adds.

M Series wheel loaders are equipped with Cat Connect technology, which allows operators to monitor, manage and enhance job site operations.

“Cat Connect facilitates easier service access, with the legacy one-piece hood, centralised service centre’s, windshield cleaning platform and harness tie-off,” Ayden explains.

“Optional purpose-built guarding is also available to help protect your machine from the harsh environments common in waste applications.”

The wheel loader’s machine guarding protects the unit’s major components and systems, facilitating reliable durability.

“Wear in waste handling applications is severe and can drastically cut down a machine’s life,” Ayden says.

“All Cat waste handling machines are protected in key impact areas, including undercarriages, radiators, axles and cabs.”

According to Ayden, the M Series medium wheel loader is 10 per cent more fuel efficient than the industry-leading K Series, and up to 25 per cent more fuel efficient than the H Series.

The updated Caterpillar powershift transmission, with a lock-up clutch torque converter, is standard on all M Series wheel loaders.

“The new torque converters have been matched with engine power and hydraulics to improve performance and fuel efficiency, while also managing the pile or loading trucks,” he says.

“The rugged transmission also has a new split-flow oil system, which uses multi-viscosity oil to reduce parasitics and improve fuel economy.”

Ayden says the M Series hydraulic system has recently undergone significant design changes.

“The main hydraulic valve is now a mono-block with an integrated ride control section,” Ayden says.

“The mono-block design also reduces weight, has forty per cent fewer leak points and is common across all M Series models.”

On 950- and 972-metre models, auxiliary hydraulic functions can be added at the factory or in the field, with the addition of a second remote valve.

“A new thermal bypass valve has also been added to improve hydraulic system warm-up,” Ayden says.

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Paddles and packaging: Wastech Engineering

Wastech Engineering’s Jeff Goodwin explains how the ATRITOR Turbo Separator can help businesses achieve a food waste recovery rate of 99 per cent.

Growing populations and an associated increase in food consumption is accelerating the organic waste problem in Australia and around the world.

As reported by Waste Management Review in June, many Australian businesses are hesitant to engage in the source separation of food waste.

This is due to a limited number of recycling facilities able to process the recovered organics, together with concerns around the ability to recycle packaging.

With the National Packaging Targets are squarely on the waste industry’s agenda, the ability to effectively separate recyclable packaging from its contents is therefore equally important.

Jeff Goodwin, Wastech Engineering’s National Product Manager Projects, says growing issues around food waste generation, paired with rising landfill restrictions and capacity levels, was the driving factor behind a recent addition to Wastech’s product portfolio.

“Working with UK manufacturer ATRITOR, Wastech has added a range of turbo separators for food de-packaging to our product roster,” Jeff says.

“As the exclusive Australian representative for ATRITOR, Wastech can provide customers with a solution offering a typical food waste recovery rate of 99 per cent for both dry and liquid products.”

Jeff says the high recovery rate makes the Turbo Separator ideally suited for use in product destruction units.

The Turbo Separator range comprises four models designed and engineered to efficiently remove a wide range of products from their packaging.

“Wastech’s distribution range includes the TS1260, TS2096, TS3096 and TS42120 models, with a material dependant separation rate ranging from 600 kilograms an hour to 20,000 kilograms an hour,” Jeff says.

According to Jeff, the equipment ideal for separating out-of-date, out-of-specification or mislabelled products.

“Historically, expired and mislabelled food products were consigned to landfill due to the difficulty of extracting organics from packaging,” Jeff says.

“With the ATRITOR Turbo Separator we can begin shifting that practice.”

Jeff says the Turbo Separator is sufficiently flexible and can de-package a range of products and packaging materials including supermarket waste, tin cans, polymer bottles and soft packaging.

“Additionally, the Turbo Separator is equally at home separating gypsum from the backing paper in plasterboard,” Jeff says.

“The recovered gypsum can be used in agriculture or re-used in plasterboard manufacturing, while the recovered paper can be further recycled.”

Jeff says the Turbo Separator also works for blister packs, sachets, pouches, paper bags, aluminium cans, plastic bottles, plastic drums and TetraPak.

“The only unsuitable application is glass containers or bottles, as the glass shatters and the shards will contaminate the organics,” he explains.

The Turbo Separator combines centrifugal forces, self-generated airflow and mechanical processes to remove organic material from packaging.

Jeff says this allows the recovered materials to be recycled or disposed of correctly.

Packaged materials are fed by an infeed conveyor into the separation chamber, where a number of rotating paddles open up the packaging.

The force of the paddles then creates a squeezing effect, which separates packaging from its contents without destroying the packaging.

Depending on the material, the recovered organics can then be used for animal feed, nutrient-rich compost or anaerobic digestion.

Wastech can supply the Turbo Separator as a complete package, with an infeed hopper and conveyor, separation chamber and outfeed conveyors.

The separator is also delivered with a maintenance access platform and control cabinet.

“The Turbo Separator’s rugged and durable construction, coupled with high product separation rates and economy of operation, is an ideal proposition for all de-packaging applications.”

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TANA Shark waste shredder

Recycling rates are increasing globally and new possibilities for using waste as a resource are opening up every year. Legislation aimed at reducing disposal to landfill means new methods of resource recovery, including waste-to-energy are leading to a variety of novel systems and processes. Because the business environment is constantly changing, having a versatile machine is invaluable.

The TANA Shark waste shredder was designed with exactly this in mind. The slow-speed multipurpose waste shredder is suitable for a variety of tasks, including pre-shredding, secondary shredding, small particle size shredding and in-line systems. It can shred a wide variety of materials, ranging from tyres, commercial and industrial waste construction, plastics to mattresses. The TANA Shark waste shredder enables full control over the particle size from 50 to 500 millimetres (two to 20 inches) with low operation costs and a possibility to perform shredding in just one pass.

One of the most problematic yet growing areas of recycling is end-of-life tyres. The TANA Shark 440 waste shredder can be used to shred tyres, with sizes ranging from car and truck tyres up to heavy earthmoving and mining.

Ensuring the end result is pure rubber without any metal wires, TANA Shark 440 takes care of the shredding process, whether its a pre-shred from 500 millimetre minus or a finished product of 50 millimetre minus.

In the primary shredding phases, unwanted metal wires are removed using an over-band magnet and a range of screens which are inserted below the rotor to generate a particular size of material. The end product size and quality can be determined and finalised by using a rotor screen with suitable mesh size out of the six available, ranging from 35 up to 220 millimetres.

Scott Morrison visits New York MRF

Prime Minister Scott Morrison has highlighted his commitment to working collaboratively with state governments and industry to grow Australia’s recycling infrastructure capacity.

The statements were made following a tour of the Sims Metal Management materials recovery facility (MRF) in Brooklyn New York.

Commenting on the scale and scope of the MRF, Mr Morrison said he was excited to see similar technology employed in Australia.

“What we’re seeing here is truly exciting, and it is truly achievable because it is commercial, and it’s a partnership between the public and the private sectors,” Mr Morrison said.

“I mean, up to about two thirds of the revenue that is generated here doesn’t come from the contracts they have with governments, it comes from the products and the revenue streams that are generated by selling that outside of this facility.”

Mr Morrison said the facility’s success highlighted that improving the recycling sector was achievable through public and private sector partnerships.

“There are many environmental challenges that we face, and we need to take action on all of them, but this one for Australia, in a highly urbanised society, one where our waste is our responsibility, these are the commercial solutions that we need to have in place,” Mr Morrison said.

“And this will be a centrepiece of our focus, not only on our domestic environmental agenda, but on our international environmental agenda.”

Sims Metal Management CEO Alistair Field said it was important that contractual arrangements with city governments were mutually beneficial.

“We work very closely with New York City, and in the times that we have ebbs and flows and commodity cycles, there has to be an understanding of how our business can manage through those cycles,” Mr Field said.

“We have seen instances here in the US and throughout the world where that has not worked. So that’s a really key arrangement and our commercial arrangement with business and government.”

When asked by media why similar technology wasn’t being implemented in Australia, Mr Morrison said the scale of operations was challenging.

The Prime Minister added that he would work closely with state governments and the Commonwealth to build that scale.

“The discussion I had with the states at the last meeting of COAG was a very enthusiastic one. I think there’s a real willingness to identify the things that can facilitate this sort of commercial activity,” Mr Morrison said.

“One of the things we are looking at is the procurement practices of our road building agencies, to ensure that they are incorporating recycled asphalt into their procurement in the tens of billions of dollars that we are spending on roads.”

Mr Morrison said higher energy costs in Australia were also a challenge, however noted the potential inherent in waste to energy processes.

“One of the exciting things about waste management is that it can generate its own energy, and plants like this can potentially become fully energy self-sufficient, through recycling waste and converting it through gasification and other processes into energy,” Mr Morrison said.

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