Geelong adopts new waste strategy

The City of Greater Geelong’s new Waste and Resource Recovery Strategy 2020-2030 has been adopted by council this week.

According to a council statement, the strategy aims to support the community actively avoid waste and increase re-use and recycling of products and materials.

“The strategy explains how the City of Greater Geelong will reduce, re-use and minimise waste in the region over the next 10 years, and incorporates recent national and state policies including the state government’s circular economy policy,” the statement reads.

“The vision supports the strategic priority of effective environmental management in the council plan and shows leadership to address waste, climate change and environmental challenges.”

Through a series of planned actions and measurable targets, council expects the strategy to deliver a major shift in the city’s approach to waste management.

Key actions over the life of the strategy include: phasing out single use plastics across city-owned buildings, implementing a trial food organics collection service, preparing a business case for the development of a food organics processing facility and partnering with government agencies to explore opportunities for alternative waste technologies.

City of Greater Geelong Mayor Stephanie Asher said it was time for the city to approach waste differently.

“This comprehensive strategy is full of clever and creative ways to reduce the city’s waste footprint,” she said.

“The city will transition to a new era of waste and resource recovery management in an effort to minimise the impacts of waste and protect the beautiful natural environment we love so much.”

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Majority of SA surface coating operators are complying

95 per cent of surface coating operators in South Australia are complying with all licence conditions.

Following results from a sector compliance report, surface coating operators across the state have been found to be placing the environment first.

Surface coating, which includes metal finishing, hot-dip galvanising and spray painting or powder coating, are covered under Schedule 1 of the Environment Protection Act 1993 (EP Act).

The primary risk to the environment from surface coating is the lack of appropriate bunding of chemicals and liquid waste, potentially resulting in soil and ground or stormwater contamination. Other environmental concerns from the activity are noise and air quality impacts. 

Naomi Grey, EPA Manager for South East and Campaigns said it was pleasing to see the greater majority of operators doing the right thing.

“The compliance of almost all of the surface coating sector shows that the industry is taking its responsibilities to protect the environment seriously,” Ms Grey said. 

A total of 40 South Australian surface coating operators were inspected by the EPA in late 2019. 

The sector compliance report revealed that 80 per cent of surface coaters undertake at least one or more activities of environmental significance. 

Out of 520 licence conditions, only 28 breaches were found due to lack of improper storage of liquid waste, with 50 per cent of those due to a lack of appropriate bunding.

“We will continue to monitor and work with operators who were found to have breached the regulations to ensure that they can operate effectively within the EP Act regulations, noting that these are difficult times for the industry during COVID-19 restrictions,” Ms Grey said. 

The sector compliance report has set out future actions for the EPA.

“All licensees are expected to undertake correct action to ensure they comply with licence conditions,” the report stated.

“The EPA will continue to monitor these actions and licensees, and take further regulatory action for any ongoing noncompliance and inspect all mobile surface coating businesses,

“Conditions on many surface coating licences will be updated to assist to achieve greater consistency in regulation of the surface coating industry.”

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Giving waste management inefficiencies a good belting

The foundation of efficient waste management comes down to the wrapped belts that keep the machinery rolling.

Compared with other developed economies, Australia generates more waste than average and recycles less. Since the Australian Commonwealth appointed a Minister for Waste last year, the nation’s effort in recovering waste has been improved.

The national packaging targets aim to ensure 70 per cent of all plastic packaging is recycled by 2025 and resource recovery facility operators are being encouraged to assist with significant environmental outcomes as the sector continues to see growth in economic opportunity and increased material availability.

Recycling plant operators have five years until the 2025 National Packaging Targets deadline approaches to capitalise on expected throughput growth. As recycling demands increase, streamlining equipment processes through installation of durable belt drives will be a key investment for recycling plant operators to reach the ultimate high-level of efficiency.

This can be achieved for recycling plant operators by installing Carlisle belts. In order to maintain operations and minimise downtime, wrapped v-belts become a critical component in the facility’s procedure.

BSC prides itself on being innovative in waste management. Providing a diverse range of belt drives to facilitate recycling applications has proven to be a performance enhancing tool for companies across the country.

Companies rely on the efficient operation of their equipment that is driven by market leading belts with an electric motor, as it ensures the smooth operation of sorters, conveyors and crushers involved in the collaborative recycling process.

To provide a complete power transmission package, BSC works closely with the American manufacturer of Carlisle belts by Timken. For over 100 years, Carlisle belts have been manufactured in the US. The Timken Company acquired Carlisle belts in 2015.

Backed by a long history in serving recycling plant operators and assisting ultimate waste management, new belt lines and products to the market, has prepared customers for the changes happening across the industry as the nation strives towards a new level of stream-lined recycling ahead of the 2025 packaging targets.

Carlisle belts by Timken are supplied exclusively to BSC as part of Inenco Industrial Solutions. Steve Hittmann, National Product Manager at BSC says every belt is backed by extraordinary engineering and technical support from BSC’s product specialists and engineered services team.

“And combining that with the Carlisle factory back-up, our personal, knowledgeable, and attentive customer service team are second to none,” he enthuses.

As operations ramp up across national recycling plant facilities, Steve says it’s more important than ever to have on-time delivery and fast turnaround. Combining BSC’s distribution and Carlisle’s flexible manufacturing model, customers in the waste management sector are experiencing short lead times and reliable delivery that are exceeding their expectations and outlasting competitors’ belts.

Steve says the Carlisle Blue Label V-belts are the finest wrapped belt in the industry.

“They’re a classical V-belt work-horse,” he says. “They also assure dependable length stability and require less re-tensioning and take-up.”

Steve adds that due to the daily operational demands at recycling plants, having wrapped belts that resist flex fatigue and have a proven longer belt life will ensure smoother waste management.

“The Carlisle Blue Label V-belts have proven to be an efficient tool as the cord is coated with a special compound that produces a secure, long-lasting bond with surrounding rubber,” he explains. “Longer belt life results in less frequent replacement, less downtime and lower maintenance costs,” Steve says.

In recycling plants, there are a lot of extremely heavy, awkwardly shaped products moving around at a high velocity. The heavy-duty fabric cover protects the core but also its extra flexibility permits the belt to bend more easily around the smallest pulleys with less strain on the fabric, which achieves the perfect amount of slip and grip needed to put the rollers in motion.

Enabling a better flow of product through the plant relies on belt drive construction and design, as that can influence overall lifespan, power transmission and efficiency. Carlisle belts are specifically designed for the harsh environments of resource recovery.

BSC and Carlisle belts by Timken have extensive experience working with numerous companies in the waste management industry across Australia and their experience enables them to understand and grow businesses through energy conservation, high sustained speeds and continuous production as the entire sector undergoes a market changing recycling revolution.

Read more articles like this at: www.lets-roll.com.au

                             

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Organics demand increases

Peats Soil & Garden Supplies has seen a spike in demand for organics product, resulting in the creation of new jobs.

Peats Soil & Garden Supplies has been at the coalface of South Australian organics recycling for decades. Peter Wadewitz, Peats Group Managing Director, tells Waste Management Review COVID-19 has created the perfect storm with an increase in organic wastes. He says this comes against a broader backdrop of increased public policy settings.

The Australian Organics Recycling Association (AORA) recently conducted a workshop in Mannum, SA and several throughout the state last year in conjunction with Jeffries, Bio Gro and a range of other composters.

“We’re all very busy. Things have worked well in Australia and it’s all under the AORA banner,” Mr Wadewitz says.

Mr Wadewitz, who is also the National Chair of AORA, says that AORA will play an increasing role now more than ever in driving Australia’s sustainable future with immense opportunities for the organics industry as a whole.

Peats Group is predicting that amid a challenging year for many, this will be one of its busiest years in sales. He says the company has put on almost 10 people as a result of the COVID-19 crisis and can’t keep up with demand.

“Our tonnages has gone up massively as a result of the virus – we’ve seen an increase up to 15 per cent,” he says.

“The capital employment opportunities are triple what we’re currently doing.”

Peats Soil & Garden Supplies has been in the horticultural business for almost 50 years. Through its four sites – Willunga, Brinkley, Dublin and now Whyalla, the company has over the years developed an array of broad-acre products, collaborating closely with scientists and the broader organics recycling industry to ensure products are certified to Australian standards.

Last year, the company announced its fourth compost and renewable energy manufacturing site, located at Whyalla City Council’s Mount Laura Waste and Resource Recovery Centre.

The site includes an Advanced Composting Facility which accepts green, organic and food waste and digests it using anaerobic digestion to produce biogas for sale into the energy grid. The compost product can be sold into surrounding agricultural markets for soil improvement and carbon enhancement.

In December, Veolia signed a $50 million contract with the City of Darwin to manage and operate the region’s Shoal Bay Waste Management Facility for seven years. Mr Wadewitz says that Peats Soil & Garden Supplies will take the green organics out of the landfill and then compost it. This will add to its existing operations with commercial organics and process upwards of 10,000 tonnes.

You can read the full story in the June Organics edition of Waste Management Review.

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Eye into the past invokes opportunity

In part three of Waste Management Review’s COVID-19 challenges and opportunities series, retired waste industry leader Max Spedding recalls how he overcame challenges in the past. He eyes opportunities for the future on the other side of the crisis.

While Australia and the globe as a whole are undoubtedly facing one of the worst collective economic and health crises since the Great Depression, there are always lessons we can gleam from the past.

So far the response from Australian federal, state and territory governments to the health crisis has been swift. At the time of writing, the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Australia was less than 7000, with more than 4000 recovered. The health crisis is very much intertwined with the economic one.

That said, there are always stories of resilience that can shed some light into how we can deal with future challenges. To that end, Waste Management Review explores how waste industry stalwarts got through challenging times in the past and their thoughts on what lies ahead for recycling.

While the International Monetary Fund expects real gross domestic product (GDP) to shrunk by 6.2 per cent this year, the 1980’s drought-related recession saw a 2.2 per cent decrease throughout 1982. Likewise, the 1990’s recession infamously referred to by former Prime Minister Paul Keating as the “recession we had to have” saw a fall of 1.7 per cent. All of these instances were linked to global pressures.

The characterisation of the current economic situation has been compared by many commentators to the Great Depression, where GDP fell by 10 per cent between 1929-31. The Great Depression of the 1930s led to a revaluation of the country’s understanding and implementation of macroeconomic policies, with Keynesian economics being developed during and after the period.

According to a speech by the Australian Treasury Macroeconomic Group in 2009, the key elements of the modern monetary policy framework has over time provided capacity for flexibility and a rapid and aggressive response to macroeconomic shocks. It cites rapid easing of Australian monetary policy in late 2008 to 2009 as an example of this flexibility. The lessons proved useful in staving off the significant impacts of the 2008 Global Financial Crisis.

The unknown territory Australia now faces itself in is how to deal with the re-build, and the three stimulus packages, valued at a collective $213.6 billion, is only one step of the way. The Federal Government has flagged that policies discussed pre-election will now be re-visited. This means tax cuts, deregulation and industrial relations reform may be a few areas looked at on the other side.

Those who have lived through multiple crises will understand that there are opportunities at the other end, and resilience is important.

Max Spedding started his career in ready mixed concrete and finished it with the National Waste and Recycling Industry Council, leading the influence of federal government policy reform on waste and resource recovery. He’s lived through multiple economic crises, including the 1973 oil crisis and 1987 stock market crash.

Spedding started his career more than 50 years ago in 1970 in the Shire of Korong north of Bendigo. After working in local government for a year, he joined Pioneer Concrete – now Hanson – in Australia and in 1971 went to the UK followed by Italy in 1973-74. He immersed himself in concrete and quarries for the next decade, focusing on managing profit and loss in his various divisions.

“In fifty years, we’ve never seen anything quite like this, but it is interesting when you reflect on problems of the past,” Spedding says.

He recalls working in Italy under 30 per cent inflation and fuel price changes. The 1973 oil crisis began after the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting countries proclaimed an oil embargo targeted at nations perceived as supporting Israel during the Yom Kuppur War.

While the US, UK and Canada were targeted, an article published by the Università del Salento indicates Italy was highly affected due to its lack of primary sources of oil.

Spedding says conditions were also challenging while the terrorist and guerrilla organisation Red Brigade remained active – a group responsible for kidnappings and robbing’s throughout Italy.

“You just couldn’t keep up with inflation, but the interesting thing was that although it took a year or so to get through it, but we did, we got there.

“Of course it was economic rather than medical, but you’ve just got to live by the day and wait for new opportunities arise.”

“It’s surprising how you have a period of intense inflation and it sort of clears the deck and establishes a new platform on the value of your investments and you can then go forward again. It’s a matter of being able to batten down the hatches and hold on and then look at the new reality that comes out and take advantage of the difficulties.”

Fast forward to 1984 and Spedding returns to Sydney to manage Pioneer’s concrete division. Things get tricker as the company becomes vertically integrated and begins to lose thousands each month, he says.

“What Pioneer taught me is to make sure you have all the information on the table and you remain focused on what the intent of it is. If you’re intent is to make money, you have to make money – overall as a group – not just one aspect of it.”

In 1987, he decided to put his learnings to greater use joining a company called Hooker Corporation in a newly formed resources division.

“That was all doing well but unfortunately George Herscu invested heavily in America in supermarkets and they went belly up and the holding company went into bankruptcy.

“That left our little resources division which was quite profitable with positive cash flow hanging out there.”

He says all team divisions were brought into the corporation under a negative pledge arrangement which saw him presented with a request for $340 million despite the division having a value of around $20 million.

“At the same time we had the 1987 crash and all of my options I had negotiated in taking on this new role went out the window.”

“But the net result was we sold off the resources division and only one bit of it failed, all the rest of it continued and is now in the hands of others.”

He says going through a liquidation and the 1987 crisis, amid incredibly high interest rates, was extremely difficult to manage but he emerged in 1989 with a role with Browning Ferris Industries (BFI) – now owned by SUEZ in Australia – running the development of new landfills in Australia and New Zealand. He developed the Lyndhurst Landfill in Taylor’s Road, one of the first lined landfill in Australia which is still in existence today.

In 1992, he took on  managing waste-to-energy market developments for BFI in Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines. Two years later, he took over as Managing Director of the BFI in Australia.

“That got me into the international waste industry. The interesting thing there was we had the Asian share market economy meltdown in 1996/97. My response to our American owners at that time was our caution in developing WtE in Asia proved to be successful. Because when the crunch came although the projects/companies we were involved in failed, we virtually had no exposure.”

“That’s one crisis that was avoided because we were probably a bit too conservative, but sometimes you have to be.”

He recalls attending a larger conference in 1996 with BFI with over 500 managers from around the world. Every third person was asked to stand up.

“The CEO says just imagine you all just lost your jobs: that’s how much the industry is going to go to recycling and unless we embrace recycling, all you guys will be out of work.”

More than 20 years’ later, he says recycling is still a real challenge for the industry.

He says we need to keep it simple and the three RRRs – reduce, reuse and recycle showed what practically can be done. He says that while metals work in the global economy and fibre works locally plastics have always been a challenge.

“Throughout my life I’ve always targeted the 80 per cent solution as this gives you the highest amount of efficiency and return and sustainability. As soon as you start to focus on the top one or two per cent, you get in trouble.”

But recycling really changed around a decade ago when organisations found a reliable outlet in China. At that point, Spedding was doing some consulting work and CEO of the Australian Landfill Owners Association until 2015.

“This model was basically to do the minimum amount of sorting and produce a bulk product with five per cent contamination or less. You offloaded it to China which had very cheap labour and poor environmental condition,” he says.

“The interesting thing that most people don’t think about is that it’s not only the cheap labour. So much material is coming to Australia as a major market for the Chinese manufacturing sector. All of the containers had to be taken back to China and they all went back empty so basically you got almost free backloading in those containers of this material.

“So using China as a low labour but also as a low cost destination because of the empty container. It was a perfect marriage, if you like. The only problem was that it wasn’t sustainable.”

He officially formed the National Waste and Recycling Industry Council in early 2017 with the backing of its national members – Alex Fraser Group, Cleanaway, J. J. Richards and Sons, Solo Resource Recovery, Suez, Toxfree, Remondis, ResourceCo and Veolia.

In mid 2017, China announced to the World Trade Organization an intention to ban the import of waste products from US, Japan, Australia and other source countries, to take full effect by the end of 2017.

He says councils went from paying $40 a tonne to offload their recyclables to suddenly being paid $10 a tonne for the material.

Spedding says that while industry was concerned, the Federal Government seemed to have little understanding about the implications.

“This was the public perception that recyclables had a value. There’s no doubt they do, but where is the value positive is the issue,” he says.

“It doesn’t start positive, it’s positive somewhere along the line from sorting and processing  down into a producing a raw material again.”

He believes the value of waste doesn’t begin at a household level, it begins at stages of sorting and processing across the supply chain and back down into a raw material.

“The issue [now] is COVID-19 has disrupted the economy totally. But the biggest thing, is that I think coronavirus has spelt the end of globalisation as we previously knew it,” he says.

“Through the 90’s globalisation was a concept being pushed by everyone by countries, companies and individuals. We had the beginnings of a truly global economy.”

He adds that COVID-19 has exposed the weakness of globalisation and our dependence on supply lines and cheaply produced components overseas.

“As we come out of the coronavirus and look at all of these policies, recycling in particular, we are going to have to re-consider the world and the approach to globalisation.”

He points out that while everyone has been talking about a circular economy, that was practical up until China closed its doors on waste exports.

“While China was producing and was part of the circular economy, that was fine, but as soon as they closed the doors and wouldn’t take the waste back, the circular economy couldn’t include them.

“Therefore, it’s no good talking about circular economy in a global situation. But now we have a situation where globalisation will certainly be on the table for review and our circular economy that we’ll be talking can be geographically smaller.”

He says that as supply chains are broken by COVID-19, Australia can consider looking a more local specialised manufacturing including from recycled materials. Additionally, it can prompt a re-think of sustainable local services, whether it be closer food supplies, medicine or equipment, improving the climate in the process.

“I’m hopeful one of the positives that will come out of this is a refocus in Australia on manufacturing and product sustainability.”

“There is an opportunity for a new approach and a greater focus on a resilient, self-reliant Australia as a result.”

“There can be a lot of positives that will come out of this as long as we return to work not thinking it’s all the same and try to go back to where we were. We need to be looking at where we can be, and how it can be better.”

Close the Loop Founder Steve Morris says the company’s brands take a long-term view in its licence to operate.

“I’ve always found that resource recovery, product stewardship and circular economy…all of that seems to be growing independent of market ups and downs,” he says.

“Right now we are expecting some big decisions coming out of government like the Recycling Victoria policy, NSW EPA and incentive work on our road products.”

He says there were many scenarios in which circumstances looked uncertain over the years, including the development of its TonerPlas product.

“Our biggest challenge there is getting a government procurement professionals to actually buy the product, to specify the product.”

He says fortunately the company has received extensive support from agencies such as Sustainability Victoria. This has helped drive the product forward and the company has worked towards long-term sustainable outputs.

“It’s certainly been risky but we’ve been 100 per cent committed all the way,” he says.

Steve says Close the Loop, which has been value-adding on-shore, was reasonably insulated from National Sword, if not feeling bullish about the policy.

“National Sword to us was a risk we became aware of two or three years before it really hit. We were feeling fairly safe because of the value-add we give the polymers here before they go through brokers into other countries.”

He agrees the way forward in a post COVID-19 world is a renewed interest local manufacturing in Australia and an increase in regional supply chains. This should be supported by state, territory and national circular economy policies.

This is the second part of a four part series on challenges and opportunities during COVID-19. You can read part one by clicking here. Part two can also be read here.

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Final weeks for public feedback on the future of waste in NSW

Over 10,000 people have already provided a submission on the NSW Government’s plan to tackle the use of plastics, reduce waste and pollution and increase recycling across the state.

There are currently two papers open for consultation until Friday, May 8.

The issues paper Cleaning Up Our Act: The Future for Waste and Resource Recovery in NSW was released for public consultation last month, to help shape the development of the NSW 20-Year Waste Strategy.

The NSW Plastics Plan discussion paper outlines actions to reduce single-use plastics in NSW and help the shift towards a circular economy. 

For more information on the policy proposals click here.

The NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment said in a statement that the plan is crucial considering in 2018-19, 60 per cent of all littered items were made from plastic and by 2050 there will be more plastic by weight in the ocean than fish. 

The second paper open for public submissions is the Cleaning Up Our Act: The Future for Waste and Resource Recovery in NSW issues paper.

The Cleaning Up Our Act plan outlines options to reduce waste and increase recycling, guides the opportunities and strategic direction for future waste and recycling infrastructure, and for growing sustainable end markets for recycled materials. 

A NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment spokesperson said there has been a fantastic response to the consultations on the 20 Year Waste Strategy and Plastics Plan.

“We have received thousands of submissions and encourage more people to have their say, with consultation running until 8 May,” the Department spokesperson said.

The Department spokesperson said to adapt during COVID-19, the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment has moved planned face to face engagement, to hold online forums and a webinar. 

“The online forums allowed participants to take an in-depth look at the issues and opportunities presented by the 20 Year Waste Strategy and Plastics Plan papers, with a strong level of engagement from industry, councils, peak bodies and government agencies,” they said.

The NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment will analyse all submissions following the closure of the consultation period next month.

“Submissions will be analysed and taken into consideration when developing the 20 Year Waste Draft Strategy and there will be an opportunity to provide feedback on the draft strategy in late 2020,” the Department spokesperson said.

“The Department of Planning, Industry and Environment is looking forward to analysing the submissions and developing an innovative and impactful 20 Year Waste Draft Strategy in late 2020.”

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WA named preferred site for new biomass facility

An Australian-United States joint venture has chosen Collie, Western Australia as its preferred site for a new facility that uses high-temperature technology to produce renewable diesel fuel from biomass.

Australian company Frontier Impact Group has partnered with US-based REEP Development to expand the use of the pyrolysis technology into the Asia-Pacific region.

According to State Regional Development Minister Alannah MacTiernan, the high-temperature pyrolysis technology involves burning biomass or waste to produce syngas, which can then be used to produce 100 per cent renewable diesel fuel.

“The US is home to the only large-scale plant of this kind in the world, with the capacity to produce up to 27 million litres of renewable diesel fuel and 10,000 tonnes of biochar each year,” she said.

The Western Australian Government has announced $100,000 in funding from the Collie Futures Small Grants Program for a feasibility study to assess the viability of the project.

If the project gets off the ground, Ms MacTiernan said it would create 48 plant jobs, 30 construction jobs and 120 indirect jobs.

“Through the Collie Futures Fund, we are beginning to see some very exciting initiatives for boosting the local economy, including this unique proposal for producing renewable diesel fuel,” she said.

“Bringing sustainable technologies and investments such as this is a fantastic way to help Collie, and WA, transition lower carbon outcomes through new industries.”

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Showcasing hero clients to promote your business

Prime Creative Media offers this advice on how to use case studies in a B2B marketing strategy.

In the midst of the Coronavirus crisis, print and digital marketing has never been more important in driving sales. Prime Creative Media continues its Engine Room series, offering this advice on how to best use case studies in a B2B marketing campaign.

Case studies are the ideal way to explain how your products or services work and the positive impact they can have on a business, by having your clients do the talking for you. It’s that all important social proof, showing prospects that working with you could improve their business too. It’s a win-win because it also gives your clients exposure.

In our experience, working with thousands of companies in Australia, case studies should form a key component of any B2B marketing strategy.

Download the complimentary guide below on the four steps to creating a successful case study.

A novel hydraulic hybrid: CJD Equipment

With carbon emissions squarely on the nation’s agenda, Lindsay Daniels of CJD Equipment breaks down the hydraulic fuel reduction capabilities of Volvo’s new E-Series excavator range.

In August 2016, CJD Equipment embarked on a large-scale sustainability project: installing solar panels at its five most energy-hungry branches. The initiative was a long-term investment designed to reduce emissions. By the end of 2017, installation on all five branches was complete.

CJD also operates recycling programs at all business units, including spill control kits across multiple locations throughout stores and workshops.

According to Lindsay Daniels, CJD Equipment National Product Engineering & Training Manager, the project falls under CJD’s wider commitment to undertake environmental risk assessment on all business activities.

In addition to “greening” their operations, Lindsay, who has worked with CJD for over 40 years, says the company strives to invest in the most sustainable and energy-efficient equipment on the market.

He highlights the Volvo EC300E Hybrid Excavator, which CJD introduced into Australia in early 2020, as an example of this commitment.

“Unlike other systems that capture the swing energy of an excavator’s upper works to electrically assist the engine, Volvo’s novel hydraulic hybrid collects ‘free’ energy generated by the down motion of the excavator’s boom and uses it to supercharge the engine system,” Lindsay says.

“This simple hybrid hydraulic shift allows operators to improve fuel efficiency by up to 20 per cent, with the boom down motion used to charge energy storing accumulators that power the engine systems.”

For waste operators, who often work in harsh, stop-start environments, Lindsay says the EC300E’s approach to fuel efficiency and sustainable energy consumption is particularly noteworthy. This is due to the fact stop-start operations often lend themselves to greater fuel consumption.

“Volvo’s unique ECO mode optimises the hydraulic system to reduce flow and pressure losses, resulting in improved fuel efficiency without any loss of performance in most operating conditions,” Lindsay says.   

The excavator also features an eco-gauge, he says, which is an added gauge bar that indicates momentary fuel consumption, tracking it under different applications. The benefit here, Lindsay explains, is knowledge of how certain tasks correlate with fuel consumption, giving operators the ability to adjust processes in service of energy efficiency.

“The excavator also has an automatic engine shutdown feature, which turns the engine off when the unit has been motionless for an allotted amount of time. This facilitates significant environmental and economic benefits for our clients,” Lindsay says.

In addition to “eco” benefits, Lindsay says the unit integrates all the standard high-quality trappings of a Volvo excavator. He adds, however, that unlike standard excavators, the EC300E stands out through its human interface design.

“The E-Series range is powerful and efficient, like all Volvo excavators, but its human-machine interface design, which streamlines all in-cab features ergonomically to produce increased operator productivity, really sets it apart,” Lindsay explains.

“The body-centric design is integrated into everything from joysticks and LCD screens to keypads and hot keys.”

Through the cab, Lindsay says operators can control pressure and flow within the auxiliary function, with 20 separate pre-set functions. Furthermore, the design gives operators a clear view of the machine through rear and side-view cameras.

Lindsay adds that as an optional extra, clients can request a Volvo smart view system, which gives operators a 360-degree view of the machine.

Positive control hydraulics and pump input torque, Lindsay says, also work to produce productivity through a high-pump flow. He adds that when combined with an electrohydraulic control system, high-pump flow creates faster response and cycle times.

“The unit also features the combination of a durable D8 Volvo stage five engine and intelligent hydraulic system, which boosts power while reducing both fuel consumption and emissions, resulting in quicker cycle times and greater productivity,” Lindsay says.

“The beauty of Volvo engines is they produce a high amount of torque at very low revolutions per minute, so you don’t have to rev the engine, therefore saving fuel and keeping noise pollution down.”

While sustainability is one of CJD’s core commitments, Lindsay says that at the end of the day, all operations need to be customer focused.

With after-sales support running 24 hours, seven days a week, he adds that CJD is able to support its customers through a vast network of branches, dealers and resident field service technicians across Australia, including major regional towns.

He says the team is always ready and willing to discuss potential energy and fuel reduction solutions with clients.

“Our support team is always on call to help with equipment upgrades or breakdowns,” Lindsay says.

“Plus, we’re committed to working with customers to ensure all attachments are fitted within the supplier’s recommendation.

“We also aim to prevent environmental damage, minimise pollution, energy and resource usage and ensure the principles of sustainable development are operated throughout all of CJD Equipment’s operations, as well as our technology and vehicle offerings.”

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