Investing in a cleantech future: NCTCE

Investing in a cleantech future: NCTCE

Peta Moore, National Cleantech Conference and Exhibition Director, highlights sustainable investment opportunities ahead of the August event.

As a novel approach to waste-to-energy (WtE), Moving Injection Horizontal Gasification technology works to sidestep the scaling issues often associated with traditional combustion technology.

Developed by Brisbane company Wildfire Energy, the technology converts biomass and waste feedstocks into energy and chemicals via a gas treatment train. With the ability to process a range of material without pre-treatment, Wildfire Energy’s current pilot product can convert between 20 to 100 kilotons of waste feedstock per annum – thereby offering an alternative solution for small-scale investment.

Moving Injection Horizontal Gasification will be one of many emerging cleantech technologies showcased at the 3-4 August National Cleantech Conference and Exhibition (NCTCE) in Brisbane.

Now in its second year, the conference will explore cleantech, an umbrella term for investment in sustainable products and services, as an instigator of innovation, creative collaborations and inclusive prosperity.

According to Peta Moore, NCTCE Event Director, cleantech is a growing sector in Australia, with an array of innovative organisations working to transform waste into economic, social and environmental opportunities.

Peta says sustainable waste management is vital to assist the transition to a circular economy.

“Some of the greatest barriers to achieving this are poor infrastructure and technology, and a lack of awareness of alternative solutions, which is what we’re hoping to address at NCTCE.”

The upcoming conference, Peta says, will showcase a number of innovative cleantech organisations, including Wildfire Energy and Licella.

“Wildfire Energy will present operational data from its pilot program and plans for a future commercial demonstration project in Queensland,” she says.

As a national platform, the event will bring together major players across the cleantech sector to exhibit new technology and research.

Peta says this year’s event will explore how cleantech can help fast-track sustainable growth. “At a time when people are asking what can be done?, this national conference will provide an insight into the solutions that exist today, or are in the start-up phase ready for investment,” Peta says.

Peta explains that plastic recycling generally takes two forms: physical and chemical. Physical focuses on the repurposing of resources, while chemical takes the material back one step further to its chemical building blocks to make brand new materials.

Drawing on a theme of problem plastic, Peta highlights Licella as another standout presenter.

“What if instead of seeing a plastics recycling crisis, Australia looks to lead the world towards a plastic neutral future? Licella will explore the opportunities of chemical recycling as a circular solution for end-of-life plastic at NCTCE,” she says.

Licella will present on its Cat-HTR technology, which transforms plastic waste into an oil, which can function as a direct substitute for fossil oil.

“This oil can be used to make fuels, chemicals and new plastics, plus the solution is commercial-ready, giving end-of-life plastic new life and transforming it into a truly circular resource,” Peta says.

The NCTCE team is currently seeking expressions of interest from event sponsors and exhibitors looking to highlight similar innovations to an audience of cleantech producers, users and policy makers.

“This is a multi-sector event. We understand that addressing the problems of today requires a holistic approach across technologies, behaviours and policies,” Peta says.

“Our speaker program aims to spotlight best-practice case studies, innovative partnerships and new business models, to help delegates navigate their way through the implementation process.

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