Are you going to Ballarat?

Ahead of the Australian Waste to Energy Forum, Barry Sullivan, Committee Chair, discusses the developing national sector.

A waste-to-energy (WtE) facility in Creswick, Victoria is exploring how to inject clear, filtered green gas into the state’s gas network. Diverting 2000 tonnes of organic waste via bio-digestion each year, the facility will serve as a case study, with replication potential highlighted by the state government.

With news of green gas and a number of high-profile WtE projects, public WtE perceptions appear to be shifting. Images of smoke and burning plastics have been replaced by productive conversations about landfill diversion and the future of renewable energy.

It’s welcome news for the team at the Australian Waste to Energy Forum, which returns to the Mercure in Ballarat this year from 18-20 February.

In its fifth consecutive year, the forum aims to provide a platform for all interested parties to discuss developments in Australia’s growing WtE sector. This year’s theme, “On the road to recovery”, has been selected to address two key areas: the application of waste hierarchy fundamentals, and changing perceptions about WtE facilities and their role within an integrated waste management strategy.

According to Barry Sullivan, Forum Chair, one of the biggest WtE challenges is lack of access to information necessary to make informed and considered investment decisions.

“We are finding there is a lot of misinformation in the public arena that inhibits project development,” Barry says.

“The issue with going to a technology vendor without basic knowledge is they will often say, don’t worry, we can make this work. In other words, when you sell hammers, everything looks like a nail.”

He adds that before looking to technologies, people need to understand their waste stream, moisture levels, quantity and calorific value, as well as the type of offtakes they hope to produce.

“The committee, and conference host, the Australian Industrial Ecology Network, intend to foster that understanding with our event,” Barry explains.

The two-and-a-half-day conference will feature a range of informative thought leader driven discussions.

“It has always been a priority of the committee to seek out presentations that will address key themes through the program, instead of just grouping abstracts into sessions,” Barry says.

“The committee has closely monitored WtE projects and changing technology over the past seven years, and we want to highlight those developments to our audience.”

Nurturing community engagement and education is also the driver behind the committee’s decision to run with a single stream.

“As WtE is still in early phases, many don’t know if they need thermal or non-thermal solutions for example, so we decided to cover all WtE elements in the one stream,” he says.

“You don’t know what you don’t know, so it makes sense for all delegates to attend each presentation.”

The program features a range of range of speakers including Federal Environment Minister Sussan Ley, Blue Environment Director Bill Grant and a keynote from Veolia Kwinana Project Director Toby Terlet.

Toby’s presentation, Energy Recovery Facilities: What’s not written on the tin, will detail challenges faced by a WtE facility in Tyseley, UK, including major upgrade works at the same time as industrial action, heavy snow and a declining national public sector budget. This presentation will discuss how Veolia worked proactively through the challenges with City of Birmingham to further cement the successful long-standing partnership and resulting in a five-year contract extension.

To develop a thriving national industry, Barry says it’s important to not only showcase success, but share challenges openly.

“Last year we had a technology company present on their biggest failure, which provided a valuable lesson for everyone in the room,”
he says.

Other discussion topics include WtE in a circular economy, anaerobic digestion, licence to operate, current project updates, project development considerations and future opportunities and developments.

“We are hosting a session where local governments can talk about future plans. It won’t feature cities with official requests for a proposal in place, but rather those that want the WtE community to know they are thinking about it,” Barry says.

Another will be how to develop technologies that provide return on investment, in spite of small tonnages.

“While WtE in Australia is certainly advancing, progress has been slow, as government agencies tend to rely on standards from Europe and North America,” Barry says.

“But Australia is a different animal with different requirements. We simply don’t have the tonnages other countries do and it’s important to develop technology around that.”

According to Barry, hosting the forum in Ballarat creates a sense of occasion.

“Not only is Ballarat accessible, with trains running every hour from Melbourne, but having a group of likeminded individuals converge on one place creates a real sense of community, and with everyone in town, the evenings are known for networking,” he says.

“We’ve now gained quite a reputation – people aren’t asking ‘are you going to the WtE forum?’ They’re asking, ‘are you going to Ballarat?’

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Australian Waste to Energy Forum

The Australian Waste to Energy Forum returns to the Mercure in Ballarat on 18-20 February 2020.

The Australian Waste to Energy Forum aims to provide a platform for all interested parties to discuss the development of a waste to energy industry within Australia.

Government, industry and individuals will be able to learn, network and discuss issues in an open forum with like-minded and interested companies and individuals.

Veolia Kwinana WtE Project Director Toby Terlet will deliver the keynote address, followed by presentations for Forum Chair Barry Sullivan, City of Ballarat Mayor Ben Taylor, Federal Environment Minister Sussan Ley and a host of industry and technology specialists.

Early-bird registration is now open, with discounts available until 17 January 2020.

For more information click here.

Waste to energy – Building the case

In strategic terms, waste to energy (WtE) is being discussed more and more in Australia, especially when authorities are required to decide on options or proposals. Making the case for a project touches on all aspects of successful implementation including; planning, technology selection, financing, construction and operation. The question is: how does this all happen in practice?

The 3rd Australian Waste to Energy Forum will provide a platform for all interested parties to discuss the development of a waste to energy industry within Australia utilising best practice techniques from around the world.

At this important industry event, attendees will:

  • Hear from national and international expert presenters across the two-and-a-half-day conference program
  • Understand the synergies and differences in energy from waste policies across Australia and contribute to a discussion about what is the political environment needed for the industry to develop
  • Have the opportunity to discuss the challenges faced by the industry and consider opportunities for businesses in this space
  • Ask questions and express opinions
  • Connect with key industry personnel

Don’t miss this opportunity to learn, network and discuss issues in an open forum with like-minded and interested companies and individuals.

WHEN: 20-22 February, 2018
WHERE: Mercure Ballarat

Register today at the AIEN website.

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