Scrubbing sands: Terex Washing Systems

Terex Washing Systems details the specifications of a new state-of-the-art aggregate washing plant in the South of England.

Construction and demolition waste management specialists R Collard have opened a new state of the art aggregate washing plant at its recycling facility in Eversley, Hampshire, UK.

The new washing plant, designed and supplied by Terex Washing Systems (TWS), incorporates the latest technology to enhance the quality and efficiency of the facility’s recycling process.

The installation was specified and project managed by TWS’ England and Wales distributor Duo Plc.

Capable of throughputs up to 120 tonnes per hour, with an annual production capacity of around 250,000 tonnes, the system will provide a local source of high-grade recycled aggregate products 12 months of the year.

The goal: to enhance the efficiency and environmental performance of regional construction and civil engineering developments in the South of England.

“Transport is a major factor in the cost of aggregate, so our investment in this plant is a direct response to increasing demand for high quality, affordable recycled product in our catchment area throughout the South East England,” says Robert Collard, Collard Founder and Managing Director.

“The refinements to the technology involved will enable us to process more waste than we collect from local sites, and create a truly closed-loop recycling system for construction waste in the South of England.”

TWS’ recycling processes are designed to transform construction and civil engineering waste into clean, homogenous recycled products.

This is achieved by removing lightweight and deleterious contaminants and extracting silt and clay, which can bind otherwise commercially viable aggregates together.

According to TWS’ Elaine Donaghy, the plant boasts a number of innovative new features, including hydrocyclone technology that produces high-grade coarse sand product with less than two per cent silt content.

Furthermore, the plant features integrated sorting systems that remove non-mineral contaminants to a greater extent than conventional dry systems, enabling more waste to be used as feedstock.

“The plant can operate all year round due to a new feeder system, which processes cohesive material even when its moisture content changes. Fully adjustable and modular components also enable bespoke products to be generated,” Donaghy says.

“The wash plant set up at R. Collard’s is an innovative, effective and coherent approach for the recycled aggregates industry.”

AGGREGATE WASHING

The R. Collard’s plant draws from TWS’ extensive range of washing equipment, incorporating the Warrior 1400 scalper, AggreeSand 165 3D2S and AgreeScrub 150. The plant also utilises a Thickner and Filterpress for water treatment and recycling.

“The process starts with an AggreScalp heavy duty scalping unit, particularly suited to claggy and clay contaminated, high soil content feeds,” Donaghy explains.

“This unit removes excess oversize before passing the bulk of material to the subsequent washing equipment.”

The AggreScalp includes a magnet to capture ferrous metals, specifically located to allow ferrous metals to be extracted in free fall before transfer to the AggreSand.

The AggreSand incorporates a 16×5 three deck screen to produce clean 50-millimetre aggregate for subsequent crushing, delivering the mid and bottom deck outputs to its partnering AggreScrub 150 for attrition and sizing.

Typical feed material contains high root content, Donaghy says, which is effectively removed by the AggreScrub.

“The flotation capabilities of the AggreScrub are ideal for addressing the variable contaminants found in recycled aggregate sources such as paper, wood and light plastics,” she adds.

“These contaminants, together with most of the water and liberated sand particles, are passed from the rear of the AggreScrub to the integrated trash screen. This step recovers the lightweight contaminants as a waste and allows the water and sand to be collected.”

In addition to flotation, Donaghy says the AggreScrub’s other key purpose is heavy attrition, which liberates adherent clays to produce clean organic-free aggregates for a wide range of construction requirements.

A 12×5 part rinser integrated within the AggreScrub modular chassis then provides the final product splits, as requested by Collards.

Underflows from the trash screen and the aggregate sizing screen are collected and pumped back to the AggreSand to recover any saleable fine material, ensuring maximum efficiency of water management.

“The 120 tonnes per hour sand plant integrated within the AggreSand produces two high quality sands from the recycled feed material, suitable for concrete, pipe bedding and general construction requirements,” Donaghy says.

“Sand and water from the AggreSand screen, together with return water and fines from the AggreScrub, is recovered via the integrated hydrocyclones, producing coarse and fine sand fractions.”

Sand fractions are then dewatered by the system to ~12 per cent m.c., providing clean and ready to handle material stockpiles.

All dirty water gravity flows from the AggreSand’s cyclones to the congruent water management system.   

“By incorporating the very latest technology to enhance the quality and efficiency of the recycling process, the plant significantly reduces cost, fuel consumption and the carbon footprint of supplying recycled aggregate to a number of key developments in the UK,” Donaghy says.

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Upward mobile expansion: Turmec

After expanding into the Australian market in late 2019, Turmec’s CEO Brian Thornton outlines the company’s mobile approach to eddy current separation.

A world without landfill, Turmec’s mission statement, defines the company’s operations, with the plants it has designed and built diverting over 45 million tonnes of waste from landfill to date.

After a series of successful contracts in Australia, Brian Thornton, Turmec CEO, says the company thought the time was right to expand, launching its Australian operations in August 2019.

“We have years of experience, along with record tonnage processing and percentage of commodity recovery,” he says.

“And with new legislation in place, and waste companies starting to invest in new technologies to maximise their recovery rates, we felt it was the right time to make the leap and set up a new arm of the company down under.”

Brian notes that Turmec is well positioned to work with Australia’s growing construction and demolition (C&D) and commercial and industrial (C&I) recycling sectors.

“At Turmec, we design customised C&D and C&I recycling plants with a 98 per cent recovery rate, which means minimised landfill costs and maximised commodity revenue,” he says.

Brian adds that Turmec opened their Australian office to commit to the market and not just fly-in-fly-out.

“We are well established with many plants in Oz already and are here to stay,” he says.

For the Australian C&D and C&I markets, Brian highlights Turmec’s latest innovation, the Mobile Eddy Current Separator, as an efficient, mobile and low maintenance solution.

“We’ve taken mobile waste processing to a new level, with our Mobile Eddy Current Separator able to achieve high capacities within a compact design,” Brian continues.

“The machine is just three metres wide and high, yet can process 300 cubic metres of material an hour.”

Developed with Turmec’s long-standing partner IFE, the new machine has already had 4000 hours of reliable operation in the field, processing both C&D and C&I waste. And according to Brian, the team is now in the process of developing a Mark II machine.

The design is focused on providing operators with a combination of flexibility and robust performance from a mobile plant, with the option of jacking legs to give an extra two metres stockpiling height, while still maintaining the machine’s compact footprint.

Designed to bolt onto the back of mobile shredders for the wood industry or for post-processing glass, incinerator bottom ash or solid recovered fuel, the plant separates ferrous and non-ferrous materials.

“The mobile package comprises a vibrating feeder with an unbalanced motor drive, magnetic rotor, and conveyors for collection of ferrous and non-ferrous materials, with another for discharging residual waste,” Brian says.

Built to ensure the highest standards of durability, the mobile separator plant is ideally suited to waste processors serving multiple sites, demolition specialists, and operators of any scale in need of additional capacity from a standalone, robust and reliable plant.

“Turmec’s Mobile Eddy Current Separator is the product of many years’ experience designing, manufacturing and installing waste processing plants,” Brian explains.

“Our innovative design ensures the plant delivers high-quality output and a trouble-free, low maintenance service life.”

In addition to the Mobile Eddy Current Separator, Turmec offers plant upgrades and full service turnkey facility solutions, working around any existing operation to minimise disruption.

“Waste is an ever-changing industry, which means Turmec must innovate to offer its clients the best solutions, keeping them ahead of legislation and marketplace driven needs; every Turmec plant is custom designed to address specific needs and waste streams, and is planned with future growth in mind,” he says.

“We can adapt to any budget, floor plan or stage of the project, whether that means a completely new plant design or an insert into an existing plant.”

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Knives out: Tutt Bryant

Tutt Bryant’s Paul Doran highlights the company’s extensive range of crushers, screens and shredders suitable for a variety of applications.

Construction and demolition (C&D) waste represents around half of the world’s solid waste, according to a 2019 report. The same figure was reported in a 2011 Construction and demolition waste guide prepared for the Federal Government.

Given the scale of Victoria’s Big Build, the towering NSW infrastructure pipeline and even the once underdeveloped Hobart, the waste leviathan shows no signs of slowing down. Such volumes are conducive to commensurate equipment investment, with the ability handle soil, gravel, sand, concrete and other ever-evolving waste streams.

Tutt Bryant Equipment, one of the largest multi-brand national distributors of construction equipment in Australia, has continued to offer a range of comprehensive equipment to deal with not only C&D, but also commercial and industrial and municipal solid waste.

Through its branches in the major centres, the company offers a wide selection of equipment to a variety of industries. These span government, construction, general equipment hire, infrastructure, mining, recycling and demolition.

As the exclusive national distributor of Metso Mobile Crushing and Screening Equipment since 2012, the company recently extended its range to include the world-renowned M&J Shredders on behalf of Metso Waste.

Paul Doran, Business Development Manager at Tutt Bryant, says that Metso is the world’s preeminent manufacturer of mobile crushing equipment, with the Lokotrack name synonymous with quality and performance.

“From the very first mobile crusher developed over 30 years ago to the latest models, Lokotrack has been the brand of choice for the world’s best contractors and producers,” he says.

Metso recently acquired McCloskey International, which necessitated the development of the Nordtrack range. Paul says it complements Lokotrack’s offering by filling in some product gaps and lowering entrance barriers.

“This latest evolution has further extended Tutt Bryant’s already impressive product range of equipment for the waste industry. Coupled with our national footprint of service and parts support, it’s a winning combination for our customers,” Paul says.

Tutt Bryant is now able to provide jaw crushers ranging from the 24-tonne J90 to the 150-tonne LT150 behemoth, aiming to offer a suitable machine for any application.

“The staple impact crushers that many in the waste industry use can now be offered in the form of a Nordtrack I908S weighing as little as 28 tonnes and up to the LT1315 which weighs in at 70 tonnes, with respective productivity increases,” Paul says.

“The introduction of the cone and screen combination plants have provided some traction with waste and mining contractors alike. The LT220D and LT330D offer a transport and fuel-efficient alternative to conventional methods.”

In addition to the extensive range of crushers, the screen range has also grown dramatically with most of the new additions at the smaller end. The soil, sand and gravel processors have access to the two-deck and three-deck screens options that range from 14” x 5” right up to the 22” x 6”, generally for aggregate production.

“The scalpers can be provided for similar applications or when feed material is mixed and sticky, but our ST2.8 has one of the most aggressive strokes in the market so the material doesn’t put up much resistance.

“The S2.11 has a massive screen deck area of 22” x 6” for serious screening while handling large feed material through its apron feeder.”

The Metso shredder is ideal for C&D waste which can contain mixed materials ranging from wood, plastic, concrete and metals. The open-cutting table design of Metso Shredders is effective in this waste stream as it minimises wear while ensuring high throughput.

Some of the main features of the Metso technology includes shredding in both directions and Metso metrics for online monitoring of performance and health status.

“Our shredders have a double hydrostatic system, which means the shafts work independent of each other. The open cutting table technology and welded-on knives means that these shredders are not sensitive to stronger and tougher material. They also provide the highest possible availability factor, lowering production costs,” Paul says.

The 35 tonne M&J 4000M comes with six to 12 knives and its big brother, the 63-tonne M&J 6000M, comes with nine to 16 knives to suit all applications. Both of these are available in electric models.

To complement the wide range of crushers, screens and shredders, Tutt Bryant has introduced a number of stackers.

Optioned as tracked, wheeled and radial, in heavy duty and standard specification, the stackers provide operation flexibility in material transfer and increased stockpile heights to reduce loader movements. They range from 20, 24 and 30 metres in length and metre-wide belts.

“If your operation needs some material crushed, screened, shredded, sorted, stacked or conveyed, chances are the team at Tutt Bryant Equipment can help,” Paul says.

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SA EPA begins illegal dump site clean-up

Clean-up is set to begin at two sites in Sedan, South Australia, where thousands of tonnes of construction and demolition waste containing asbestos was found dumped in 2017.

The sites, on Battens and Pipelines roads, were discovered after an EPA investigation involving the SA Police, the National Heavy Vehicle Regulator and local government.

EPA Director Regulation Peter Dolan said the EPA had stepped in to remove the waste after the Port Adelaide-based demolition contractor alleged to have dumped the material failed comply with a clean-up order.

“We have engaged appropriately licensed contractors to carry out the work in order to protect the community and the environment,” he said.

“I can assure residents that the clean-up and transport operation is perfectly safe. Asbestos has to be inhaled to be hazardous to human health.”

According to Mr Dolan, the waste has been sprayed with glue to prevent the escape of exposed asbestos fibres.

“It will be wrapped and transferred in covered trucks to a specially lined cell at the Cambrai Waste Depot, which is licensed to receive asbestos,” he said.

“Air quality monitoring is also being carried out at both sites while work is under way.”

Transporting the waste from Sedan to Cambrai is expected to take one month, with trucks working between 8am and 5pm, Monday to Friday.

“The EPA is in the process of preparing a brief for the Crown Solicitor, seeking criminal prosecution relating to the dumping of the waste and cost recovery for the clean-up,” Mr Dolan said.

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Recyclers confident about performance in face of crisis

Although it is early days for COVID-19, some organisations have already identified the potential for new business and innovation over the next six months. The finding comes against a broader backdrop of concern about public policy settings for recycling, a breaking report commissioned by Australian Council of Recycling (ACOR) has shown.

ACOR, which represents the $15 billion strong resource recovery industry, commissioned Prime Creative Media to undertake a measure of industry confidence of Australia’s recycling sector.

From January to March 2020, Prime Creative Media surveyed more than 500 respondents working in municipal waste (MSW), commercial and industrial (C&I) and construction and demolition (C&D) waste. This included an updated survey conducted in the past two weeks.

The research reports found that, while almost half of all organisations across MSW, C&I and C&D streams are positive about their organisation’s own performance and prospects, more than a third of industry respondents across all streams are not positive about public policy and government settings for resource recovery.

Respondents ranked issues most important to them and the top three issues across organisations working in MSW, C&D and C&I.

Keys issues highlighted by respondents were a need for greater reinvestment of State-based waste disposal levy funding into activities in resource recovery; grants/loans for resource recovery especially infrastructure and technology; and pro-active purchasing of recycled content products by the public sector.

In ACOR’s second follow-up – COVID-19 Industry Pulse Check – 41 per cent of just under 100 participants indicated they were somewhat impacted by COVID-19, 35 per cent very impacted and 16 per cent unsure of the impact.

Several respondents indicated they would like clarifications on what the meaning of waste as an essential service is. Respondents called for waste levy relief by pausing waste levy increases over the next six months to 12 months.

Businesses are also somewhat confident about identifying new business opportunities over the next three to six months, with 35 per cent indicating some level of positivity.

ACOR CEO Pete Shmigel said that with the Council of Australian Government’s ban on the export of unprocessed materials, re-investment into the sector is critical now more than ever.

“It’s hoped that governments take the findings of these reports under consideration as part of the ongoing response to COVID-19 and more broadly.

The overall picture is one of an industry that believes in its own capability, and was planning significant capital investments, but that is not as confident about the policies, regulations and government frameworks under which it operates. The latter are key to industry development,” Shmigel said.

“If we want to optimise recycling’s environmental and economic benefits, including during COVID19 when we really need those hi-viz jobs, we need to better line up industry interests and their social outcomes and public policy.

Implementation of the National Waste Policy with all stakeholders around one table is an opportunity in that way. It’s time for an era of better partnership, including around infrastructure, procurement, planning, and economic signals like waste disposal levies,” he added.

You can read the full results of the survey here.

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The value of waste: CDE

Waste Management Review explores how CDE wet processing technology is supporting Melbourne-based recycling company Repurpose It to reduce a reliance on landfills.

Operating from its 150-acre rehabilitated quarry site in Epping, Repurpose It has an ambitious vision to achieve a 100 per cent recycling rate across its complete waste portfolio.

Likewise, it aims to ensure zero unnecessary waste is destined for landfill. This vision is perfectly aligned with CDE, an industry-leading manufacturer of wet processing technologies, whose ethos is unlock a “New World of Resource”.

To achieve its aspirational environmental aims, George Hatzimanolis, CEO of Repurpose It, turned to CDE to design and engineer a state-of-the-art solution to transform construction, demolition and excavation (CD&E) waste, along with contaminated railway ballast, into in-spec sand and aggregate products that meet the requirements of the local building industry.

George says Repurpose It is committed to recycling products at the end of their lifecycle to transform them into materials that will be used at the beginning of a new lifecycle. These include waste previously considered difficult to process, he adds.

“To achieve 100 per cent recycling of construction and demolition waste, we required a wet processing solution that could efficiently separate and wash every available fraction of material in the feed,” George says.

CDE’s solution, a first-of-its-kind in Australia, incorporates a selection of modular elements that work in synergy to produce best-in-class results, including an AggMax logwasher, the latest in the CDE patented Infinity screening range, a ProGrade H2-60 screen, an EvoWash sand classification and dewatering system, conveyors, a decanter centrifuge and AquaCycle thickener.

Every day, the plant processes up to 150 tonnes an hour of CD&E waste into high-value construction products, which would have otherwise been bound for landfill.

CDE’s customised solution processes CD&E waste and rinses and grades it to make six in-spec products, four aggregates (4-10, 10-20, 20-150, 50-100 oversize) and two sands (0-2 and 0-4).

Daniel Webber, CDE Australasia Regional Manager, says entrepreneurial companies such as Repurpose It have identified that the Sydney Basin and Melbourne are running out of sand.

“The depletion of local sand reserves means that construction and concrete companies now have to transport sand via road from further away or turn increasingly to the production of manufactured sands from hard rock deposits which are more expensive to mine and more hard-wearing on plant and equipment,” Daniel explains.

“This is where CD&E waste processing plants come into their own. They accept waste feed from metropolitan areas and clean it to repurpose it back into the local construction market.”

At the same time, Daniel says there is limited room available for tailing ponds.   

“CDE’s world-leading water recovery and tailings treatment technologies are used to make dry tailings that can be transformed into marketable products themselves,” he adds.

Hand-in-hand with protecting the planet’s finite natural resources is protecting the Earth itself and minimising the carbon emissions associated with the industry.

Vitally, the innovative wet processing plant commissioned for Repurpose It by CDE enables the waste-to-resource business to reduce its carbon dioxide output by more than 84,000 tonnes per year, based on processing 500,000 tonnes of feed material.

“Our investment demonstrates our commitment to reducing the construction industry’s reliance on extractive resources and underpins our company values of creating value from waste,” George says.

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Supporting business continuity: Mandalay Technologies

With the impact of COVID-19 being felt by waste businesses across the country, Mandalay Technologies provides advice on mitigating some of the social and economic risks through improved service delivery.

Read moreSupporting business continuity: Mandalay Technologies

New CRC initiative seeks 80 per cent reduction in construction waste

Building 4.0 CRC, a collaborative initiative that seeks to reduce waste and emissions from building projects, has received a $28 million Cooperative Research Centre grant from the Federal Government. 

Monash University, Lendlease, The University of Melbourne, Donovan Group, BlueScope, Sumitomo Forestry and CSR, along with 23 other partners, have been successful in securing the funding to establish Building 4.0 CRC – an initiative seeking to transform how buildings are designed and manufactured in Australia.

Announced by Industry, Science and Technology Minister Karen Andrews, the $28 million grant will leverage a combined $103 million from industry, government and research partners – bringing the combined research budget to $131 million over seven years.

According to a Monash University statement, the Building 4.0 CRC research initiative is focused on using digital solutions, new products and processes to transform Australia’s building industry to a tech-enabled, collaborative future.

“Some of the outcomes this initiative hopes to achieve include: an 80 per cent reduction in construction waste and a 50 per cent reduction in Co2 emissions for more sustainable buildings,” the statement reads.

Building 4.0 CRC Chair and Engineers Australia CEO Bronwyn Evans said the initiative will bring together expertise in the fields of architecture, design, planning, construction, engineering, business, information technology and law to develop industry-wide practices and protocols intended to transform the entire sector.

“It will also leverage the latest technologies, data science and artificial intelligence to enable the application of robotics and digital fabrication to optimise all phases of building delivery – including development, design, production, assembly, operation, maintenance and end-of-life,” she said.

“The Building 4.0 CRC is going to be a really important factor in making sure we have a competitive future and we are addressing those broad sector needs.”

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