Driving commercial recovery: JCB CEA

Deon Cope of JCB CEA outlines how a new range of waste sector specific excavators is helping resource recovery operators grow commercial and industrial recycling rates.

With NSW landfill levies now sitting at $141.20 per tonne in metropolitan areas, it may come as a surprise that less than 10 per cent of the state’s commercial and industrial waste (C&I) is recycled.

While minimal resource recovery is always a concern, costs exceed environmental dangers when applied to businesses, leading to increased disposal costs and even lost revenue streams.

Historically, industry stakeholders have attributed low C&I recycling rates to disparate material range and size, and, as such, the difficulty of commercial sorting.

JCB CEA is attempting to address low recovery rates and difficulty perceptions through investment in reliable machinery and emerging technologies.

According to Deon Cope,  JCB CEA National Excavator and Wheeled Loader Product Manager, the company takes pride in delivering equipment to facilitates high resource recovery rates, production, supply and delivery of quality recycled materials.

JCB CEA nationally distributes a broad range of world-class JCB products.

This. Deon says, highlights JCB CEA’s extensive waste sector reach, and, subsequently, the companies understanding of its vehicle and machinery needs.

“Drawing on our experience working with a range of Australian waste and resource recovery companies, we can confidently say that our latest range, JCB’s Hydradig Wastemaster wheeled excavators, represents a new and exciting material handling solution,” Deon says.

He says that given the excavators’ durability and high-strength manufacturing, they’re well suited to virtually any waste stream, including C&I.

The Wastemaster range, Deon says, delivers on five important customer criteria to ensure maximised productivity and safety: viability, stability, mobility, manoeuvrability and serviceably.

“The range has a low centre of gravity, allowing stable lifting while working at full reach mobility. Additionally, two- and four-wheel steer and crab steering deliver high usability on even the smallest job sites,” Deon says.

With safety a central concern for waste operators, Deon says the Wastemaster features a cab guard falling object protection system.

“From ground level, the excavator’s all-round visibility also allows ground staff to see the operator at all times,” he adds.

The JCB Hydradig Wastemaster wheeled excavator has a sturdy all-wheel drive and four-wheel steer chassis, Deon says, based on JCB’s proven Loadall telescopic handler concept.

“This delivers three-mode steering for maximum manoeuvrability and stability when travelling at speed,” he says.

“Furthermore, as the engine is side-mounted, the centre of gravity is far lower than conventional 10-tonne wheeled excavators, adding to the machine’s stability.”

Hydrostatic drive is provided through a combination of variable piston pump and variable piston drive motors to a central transfer box and then to both axles.

“This driveline layout offers a step-less zero-to-20 kilometre per-hour speed range for solid or semi-solid tyres and a 40-kilometre-per-hour option for conventional pneumatic tyres,” Deon explains.

“Near 50/50 weight distribution between the axles and a longer wheelbase than competitive 10-tonne machines also deliver improved stability, instilling confidence for the operator.”

The range offers a minimum turning radius of just under four metres at 3946 millimetres on single tyres operating within four-wheel steer.

According to Deon, the machine can be ordered with single tyres, extra-wide flotation tyres or dual tyres on each axle.

JCB CEA operates as the main supplier for a number of waste and resource recovery companies, Deon says, offering a range of high-quality products and customer-focused support.

He adds that as the company has a deep understanding of the waste industry and its associated equipment and machinery needs, JCB CEA can provide extensive pre-purchase consultation.

Deon adds that JCB CEA works to streamline the acquisition and serving process, with more than 90 dealer outlets allowing the company to provide sales, parts and service through a network of Australia-wide branches and dealers.

“JCB CEA understands the unique requirements of the waste and resource recovery industry and is always available for after-sales support and servicing,” he says.

“We’re a customer-focused business, and it’s great to work with clients embracing resource recovery in an evolving waste sector.”

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Recyclers confident about performance in face of crisis

Although it is early days for COVID-19, some organisations have already identified the potential for new business and innovation over the next six months. The finding comes against a broader backdrop of concern about public policy settings for recycling, a breaking report commissioned by Australian Council of Recycling (ACOR) has shown.

ACOR, which represents the $15 billion strong resource recovery industry, commissioned Prime Creative Media to undertake a measure of industry confidence of Australia’s recycling sector.

From January to March 2020, Prime Creative Media surveyed more than 500 respondents working in municipal waste (MSW), commercial and industrial (C&I) and construction and demolition (C&D) waste. This included an updated survey conducted in the past two weeks.

The research reports found that, while almost half of all organisations across MSW, C&I and C&D streams are positive about their organisation’s own performance and prospects, more than a third of industry respondents across all streams are not positive about public policy and government settings for resource recovery.

Respondents ranked issues most important to them and the top three issues across organisations working in MSW, C&D and C&I.

Keys issues highlighted by respondents were a need for greater reinvestment of State-based waste disposal levy funding into activities in resource recovery; grants/loans for resource recovery especially infrastructure and technology; and pro-active purchasing of recycled content products by the public sector.

In ACOR’s second follow-up – COVID-19 Industry Pulse Check – 41 per cent of just under 100 participants indicated they were somewhat impacted by COVID-19, 35 per cent very impacted and 16 per cent unsure of the impact.

Several respondents indicated they would like clarifications on what the meaning of waste as an essential service is. Respondents called for waste levy relief by pausing waste levy increases over the next six months to 12 months.

Businesses are also somewhat confident about identifying new business opportunities over the next three to six months, with 35 per cent indicating some level of positivity.

ACOR CEO Pete Shmigel said that with the Council of Australian Government’s ban on the export of unprocessed materials, re-investment into the sector is critical now more than ever.

“It’s hoped that governments take the findings of these reports under consideration as part of the ongoing response to COVID-19 and more broadly.

The overall picture is one of an industry that believes in its own capability, and was planning significant capital investments, but that is not as confident about the policies, regulations and government frameworks under which it operates. The latter are key to industry development,” Shmigel said.

“If we want to optimise recycling’s environmental and economic benefits, including during COVID19 when we really need those hi-viz jobs, we need to better line up industry interests and their social outcomes and public policy.

Implementation of the National Waste Policy with all stakeholders around one table is an opportunity in that way. It’s time for an era of better partnership, including around infrastructure, procurement, planning, and economic signals like waste disposal levies,” he added.

You can read the full results of the survey here.

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BINGO opens new Sydney recycling centre

BINGO Industries has opened its newest recycling centre in Mortdale, Sydney, with a license to collect 220,000 tonnes of commercial and industrial waste each year.

Located in close proximity to major transport routes the M5 Motorway and King Georges Road, BINGO CEO Daniel Tartak said the new facility provides a convenient tipping location for South West Sydney’s construction and demolition and commercial and industrial waste.

“This is an exciting milestone for our larger Sydney network redevelopment, and our Mortdale facility has been designed to play an important transfer and collections role within this network.” he said.

According to Mr Tartak, the facility has been built to comply with BINGO’s high standards of safety and environmental management, with advanced safety systems including fire protection hydrants, hose reels, sprinklers, water storage tanks, traffic barriers and CCTV inspection cameras.

100 kilowatts of roof-mounted solar panels have also been installed, which will see BINGO save roughly 2500 tonnes of carbon emissions over the life of the panels.

“The facility is a great example of what investment in recycling infrastructure can achieve, even at a smaller site. What was once an outdated waste facility is now leading the way in terms of fire protection, traffic flow efficiency and site safety,” Mr Tartak said.

“Space is at a premium at this site. To ensure we get our customers in and out as quickly as possible, we’ve installed four split weighbridges, meaning we can have trucks weighing in and out at the same time.”

Materials tipped at BINGO’s Mortdale facility will be sorted through the newly installed onsite plant. Material off-take will then be transferred to BINGO’s Eastern Creek and Patons Lane recycling plants, where it will be turned into BINGO’s ECO-product range of recycled building and landscaping products.

“With construction activity expected to increase across Sydney over the coming year, the opening of our Mortdale facility is well-timed,” Mr Tartak said.

“Sydney’s population and economic growth is fuelling an increase in waste volumes, and we need recycling infrastructure such as this to prevent waste from going into landfill.”

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Filling the gaps: Jillian Riseley and MWRRG

The Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Group’s new CEO Jillian Riseley discusses the agency’s plans for 2020, including a new C&I strategy and advanced waste processing procurement.

When the City of New York announced a “zero waste” to landfill plan by 2030 in 2015, the Department of Sanitation looked to significantly expand its kerbside organics collection.

While the plan was announced well before China’s National Sword impacted the global markets, the city’s strategy is redolent of a global shift towards finding replacements for landfill.

With half the population of New York City, Melbourne has looked to progressively reduce a reliance on landfill, with an organics network spearheaded by the Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Group (MWRRG) to fill that gap.

Much of the agenda began to be implemented after the release of the Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Implementation Plan in 2016, which aimed to minimise the need to schedule any new landfills before 2026 and find alternatives, especially in the southeast.

MWRRG’s plan for landfill alternatives continues and is now being led by Jillian Riseley, who joined MWRRG as CEO on 2 September. She replaces Rob Millard, who led the organisation for 12 years.

Jillian has extensive experience in senior roles in complex, multi-stakeholder and regulated environments where she has led significant national consumer affairs and recycling initiatives and implemented procurement strategies in complex essential service markets.

Waste Management Review sat down with Jillian to discuss MWRRG’s upcoming policy work in collaborative procurement, its Back to Earth Initiative, a planned commercial and industrial (C&I) strategy and advanced waste processing (AWP) procurement.

Progress against the initiatives are recorded in MWRRG’s 2018-19 Annual Report. Tabled in Victorian Parliament in October, the Annual Report acknowledges that the waste and resource recovery sector was forced to navigate significant changes over the past year, both local and international.

It includes a number of comprehensive actions both finalised and set for completion in the coming year, including facilitating a litter prevention program, improving multi-unit dwelling waste management and the development of a Sustainability Hub at Fishermans Bend.

Jillian says her background and passion for sustainability and collaborative procurement is what drew her to MWRRG.

“There are huge opportunities as we’re seeing a step change in the way that we, as a state, manage resource recovery,” Jillian says.

“For example, the opportunity to incorporate recycled content, recover resources and reuse them in roads is a massive opportunity.”

She says that with the Victorian Government’s circular economy policy coming out later this year, there is an opportunity for MWRRG to work with councils and the C&I sector towards reducing waste and increasing resource recovery.

MWRRG continued its support for councils through collaborative contracts, capacity building, procurement and education to ensure services continued as normal. It established the feasibility for a collaborative procurement approach for an alternative to landfill through the Metropolitan Regional Business Case for Advanced Waste Processing.

To that end, AWP is one part of MWRRG’s strategic and integrated approach to waste management. Metropolitan councils were invited to work with MWRRG, culminating in one of the largest collaborative procurements in the country. Sixteen council’s in Melbourne’s south-east are working together on a joint AWP procurement while councils in the north and west are assessing their needs.

DERIVING COLLABORATIVE VALUE

Jillian says that collaborative procurement, more generally, creates significant value for councils not just in price, but helping to build a sustainable sector, with governance and social indicators also part of that.

She adds that the collaborative procurements are very much council driven, with the local government sector identifying the best possible model to solve their local challenge.

“Our AWP procurement is often misunderstood as it’s technology agnostic. The initial stage of the project is going out and looking at the best infrastructure in the world to find a solution to the challenge of diminishing reliance on landfill,” she says.

In addition to finding an alternative to landfill, MWRRG has continued to support councils to respond to changes in the recycling sector, most recently with the collapse and subsequent sale of SKM Recycling. In the short-term, it is coordinating panel contracts to allow councils to access a recycling processor.

In the long-term, MWRRG is awaiting the release of the Circular Economy Policy, which may have implications on the available volumes and composition of recyclables.

“We have a vested interest in making sure the waste and resource recovery industry is strong and sustainable both environmentally and financially,” she says.

“That holistic look we’ll get from a circular economy policy should hopefully strengthen the whole chain not just that little piece from an SKM risk perspective, but looking globally and at the whole system.”

Earlier this year MWRRG conducted 180 waste audits and industry workshops to inform a C&I strategy that will initially focus on reducing the volume of plastics and food going to landfill.

“It will be interesting to see where we land in the development of our C&I strategy as we’re now going through the data,” Jillian says.

She says that a substantial amount of paper is going to landfill in the C&I sector.

According to the National Waste Report, around 31.7 million tonnes of materials were processed for recycling, with C&I representing 37 per cent of this. The report highlights that in many instances, C&I recycling rates are lower than they could be due to the cost of additional bins and collections being seen as prohibitive.

“Plastics also feels like an obvious place to start, but having worked a lot with both the corporate and C&I sector, the way in which those sectors work and their sub-sectors within sectors work are very bespoke and unique,” she says.

“So, whatever the strategy is and whatever we decide to focus on, we will need to tailor the strategy to that sector.”

Jillian says MWRRG is looking at releasing a draft C&I strategy at the start of next year.

“Utilising existing networks and the trusted stakeholder relationships we have built over the last decade will be really useful,” she says.

The Back to Earth Initiative, a successful organics social marketing campaign with 28 councils, is also being expanded in 2019-20.

“We commissioned some social research last year looking at the kind of messaging that resonates with people and encourages them to change their behaviour, so we’re now rolling out a new version of Back to Earth, offering it to more councils and including a focus on food waste recycling,” she says.

Jillian says MWRRG provides councils a complete FOGO support service, from planning to implementation, evaluation and social marketing. It comes as the capacity of its organics processing network already exceeds the Metropolitan Implementation Plan 2021 target of 120,000.

“We’re working with our colleagues at Sustainability Victoria to support the work they do around Love Food, Hate Waste, so we’re looking at the whole continuum, from what you buy and how you prepare it to what you do with what’s leftover.”

Supporting that was the development of a FOGO guide in late 2018 which provided practical tools and advice for planning and implementing a service in six stages.

“There’s been great pick-up of the guide with councils actually using it and following the steps in order to plan and implement their own FOGO or conduct their own trials,” Jillian says.

“Since launching in August last year, we have delivered follow-up workshops and training to staff from every council in metropolitan Melbourne and several regional councils who have valued the practical steps outlined in the guide,” she says.     

In tackling buffer protection, MWRRG also reached a memorandum of understanding with key agencies on a whole-of-state government approach. It delivered three hub plans in West Melbourne, Dandenong South and Epping, which are being implemented, and is providing support at another six sites.

While there are numerous challenges ahead, Jillian looks forward to tackling them collectively with industry.

“The silver lining is the average Victorian is much more aware of waste and recycling and there is a groundswell of support for finding solutions to our national challenges and taking increased responsibility for recycling,” she says.

“With visibility and motivation comes opportunity, supported through a circular economy policy and the introduction of FOGO.”

This article was published in the December 2019 edition of Waste Management Review. 

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QLD State of the Environment report highlights interstate waste

The Queensland Government has released its 2018 State of the Environment report, highlighting interstate waste as a pressure on the state’s landfills.

Relatively low costs of landfill disposal in Queensland are said to be the motivator for cross-border flow of waste in the report.

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More than 1.26 million tonnes of domestic waste, 2.146 million tonnes of construction and demolition waste (C&D), and 1.443 million tonnes of commercial and industrial (C&I) waste was sent to landfill in 2016-17.

Of this, 53,000 tonnes of domestic waste, 640,000 tonnes of C&D waste and 23,000 tonnes of C&I waste was generated interstate and transported to Queensland landfills.

The amount of trackable waste received from interstate also increased from around 13,000 tonnes in 2011-12 to 52,200 tonnes in 2015-16.

Littering and illegal dumping is also highlighted as a serious environmental pressure, with reports suggesting the problem as widespread throughout Queensland.

The average number of litter items was found to be higher in Queensland than other Australian stats, particularly at beaches, retail strips and recreational areas.

Queensland Environment Minister Leeanne Enoch said the increase in the amount of interstate waste was proof that that Queensland needed a waste levy.

“The state government’s waste management strategy will stop interstate waste and increase investment in the industry to encourage more recycling and create jobs,” Ms Enoch said.

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