East Waste introduces SA’s first electric-powered collection truck

South Australia’s first electric-powered kerbside collection truck has taken to the streets of metropolitan Adelaide this week.

The new truck is owned and operated by waste and resource management company East Waste, a subsidiary of seven metropolitan Adelaide councils.

East Waste General Manager Rob Gregory said the new truck replaces a diesel-powered truck and, with zero emissions, will remove the equivalent of 20 vehicles generating 63 tonnes of carbon dioxide every year from Adelaide’s suburban streets.

The truck, supplied by Australian company Superior Pak with drivetrain technology from SEA Electric, is the first in a fleet replacement program.

“It will deliver financial gain to better manage the cost of kerbside collections of recyclable resources and waste,” Mr Gregory said.

“We conservatively project that our new electric vehicle will save more than $220,000 over the seven-year life of its diesel predecessor.”

According to Mr Gregory, East Waste has installed a 30 kilowatt solar system at its Ottaway depot to produce renewable energy for the truck’s batteries.

“Residents will fall in love with our new truck without realising it,” he said.

“With reduced air pollution comes the removal of noise pollution as the truck travels from house to house on bin collection day. It is almost silent.”

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JCB delivers its first-ever electric excavator

JCB in late 2019 made history after unveiling its first-ever electric excavator – the quietest digger in its range and offering zero emissions.

The machine sees the replacement of a diesel engine with an efficient, 48-volt electrical driveline with the latest generation automotive battery cells.

As part of its shift towards lower emissions, the zero-emission JCB 19C-1 E-TEC will allow the waste sector to maximise productivity in emissions-sensitive inner city environments.

A huge advantage is external noise. At 7dBA lower, the machine is five times quieter than its traditional diesel-powered counterpart.

Importantly, performance is not compromised on digging, with a fully charged electric machine capable of putting in a full shift in normal operation.

The machine also supports maximum uptime with no daily checks of coolant and engine levels required. On that front, the high efficiency of the advanced electric-hydraulic combination means considerably lower cooling requirements. A small hydraulic cooler with a thermostatic electric fan and no engine radiator works to contribute to longer battery life and lower noise levels.

Initially, the mini excavator will be available with the ROPS/TOPS and FOGS certified canopy. As the electric excavator is based on the premium specification 19C-1, the excavator comes with proportional rocker switches for auxiliary functions and boom offset swing.

Its key features include a standard load-sensing hydraulic system delivering powerful digging performance. A convenient on-board charger with 230-volt input allows for six-hour recharging capability.

Fuel cell powered waste collection vehicle in development

Commercial vehicle manufacturer Scania has teamed up with Swedish waste company Renova to develop a fuel cell powered refuse truck with a fully electrified power train and compactor.

The two companies aim to reduce emissions and noise to make the electrified vehicles an attractive alternative when working in residential areas at early hours of the morning.

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Renova and other waste handling companies have previously carried out trials with electric refuse trucks, however this will be the first with fuel cells.

Scania Electric Powertrain Technology Project Manager Marita Nilsson said the company is highly interested in gaining more experience of fuel cells in actual customer operations.

“Fuel cells constitute a promising technology in the needed decarbonisation of transports,” Ms Nilsson said.

Renova Head of Development Hans Zackrisson said electrification using fuel cells fuelled by hydrogen is a highly appealing alternative for heavy commercial vehicles such as refuse trucks.

“The trucks benefit from all the advantages of electrification while maintaining some of the best aspects of fossil-fuel operations, namely range, hours in service and payload,” Mr Zackrisson said.

Scania has also previously partnered with Norwegian food wholesaler Asko to develop hydrogen fuel cell technology for its production plant.

The project is being implemented in cooperation with the Swedish Energy Agency and Stockholm’s Royal Institute of Technology. The fuel cell refuse truck is expected to be delivered in the end of 2019 or by the beginning of 2020.

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