QLD council awards 10-year contact to Cleanaway

Starting 1 July 2021, Cleanaway will provide general waste and commingled recycling collection services under a 10-year agreement with Logan City Council.

Logan City Council Mayor Darren Power said in addition to the collection of waste and recycling bins, the new agreement includes options for council to introduce a garden waste bin service and an on-demand bulky waste pick-up service across the city.

“We will be considering these options over the next few months,” he said.

The tender was awarded after a comprehensive evaluation of bids, Power said, conducted under the supervision of an external probity advisor.

According to Cleanaway Solid Waste Services General Manager David Wheeley, the contract will enable 60 new local jobs, with additional opportunities in procurement and supply.

“Cleanaway’s mission is ‘to make a sustainable future possible’ and for us this means taking a leadership role in environmental sustainability, providing sustainable employment for our people and actively supporting the communities we are part of,” he said.

“Our new side-lift collection fleet will be equipped with the Cleanaview, our in-cabin technology which provides real-time data on collection services and enables us to provide support to residents to use our services correctly, reduce contamination and reduce waste to landfill.”

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TSA and Logan City Council trial crumb rubber road

Logan City Council has teamed up with Tyre Stewardship Australia (TSA) to trial a new eco-friendly road surface.

The surface is a combination of old tyres and reclaimed asphalt, and will be installed on Lagoon Road, Carbrook over the next month.

TSA has committed $150,000 to the trial and additional lab testing, which aims to prove the new surface will be as good as, or better than, standard road sealing.

Logan City Council Road Water Infrastructure Director Daryl Ross said council is always looking at innovative ways to deliver better roads.

“Council wants to build a road network that is suitable for our growing region,” he said.

“This partnership with TSA aims to enhance road quality for users in a cost-effective way.”

According to TSA CEO Lina Goodman, the trial is about creating a recycled road product that saves money, while delivering a safe and reliable product.

“It also has a huge environmental benefit to the community because it is using recycled tyres,” she said.

Crumb rubber is produced by reducing scrap tyres down to their basic materials and removing steel and fibre, along with any other contaminants such as dust, glass or rock. Reclaimed asphalt consists of old, damaged pavement materials milled and crushed into a new mixture.

According to a TSA statement, Australia generated the equivalent of 56 million used car tyres in the last financial year.

“Eighty-nine percent of them were recovered for reuse or processed into tyre derived products. The rest ended up in landfill or were stockpiled,” the statement reads.

“In Queensland, the equivalent of 12.7 million car tyres were generated with a similar recovery rate of 69 per cent. Around 14 per cent of the recovered tyres were locally recycled into crumb rubber and granules.”

The trial will begin in May, with initial results expected in August. Queensland civil infrastructure firm Fulton Hogan will construct the road.

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