MWRRG announces shortlist for advanced waste processing facility

The Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Group (MWRRG) has announced a shortlist of companies to develop an alternative to landfill in Melbourne’s south east.

In March 2020, MWRRG called for expressions of interest for solutions to provide an alternative to landfill for 16 councils.

After a competitive tendering process, three companies have been shortlisted to join the solution development stage of the procurement: Veolia Environmental Services Australia, Sacyr Environment Australia and a Pacific Partnerships and REMONDIS consortium.

According to a MWRRG statement, landfills in the south east of Melbourne are filling up and no more are planned to be built.

“Household rubbish in the 16 councils is projected to increase by 40 per cent over the next 25 years,” the statement reads.

“Veolia Environmental Services Australia, Sacyr Environment Australia and Pacific Partnerships and REMONDIS will work with the 16 councils to develop an advanced waste processing solution that delivers environmental, economic and social benefits to the community.”

MWRRG said the best outcomes will be achieved by minimising waste and reusing or recycling, with leftover material managed through advanced waste processing.

“Advanced waste processing will help the Victorian government deliver on its circular economy strategy – Recycling Victoria – a 10 year plan that will completely overhaul Victoria’s recycling sector and reduce waste going to landfill,” the statement reads.

“Advanced waste processing solutions will play a significant role in achieving the new target to divert 80 per cent of household rubbish from landfill by 2030.”

The advanced waste processing procurement will ensure facilities meet best-practice environment protection requirements and energy efficiency standards, and do not displace or inhibit innovation to reduce or recycle materials.

Additionally, the procurement will ensure the facilities reduce greenhouse gas emissions compared to the waste and energy services they displace.

“Advanced waste processing technologies have been used successfully and safely overseas for years as an alternative to landfill,” the statement reads.

“The new facilities are expected to attract investment of around $650 million and create jobs during construction and permanent operating jobs.”

It is expected the process will take close to two years to reach a final tender stage, with a 20 to 25-year contract to be awarded by 2022. Construction is expected to commence in 2023.

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Melbourne composting facility receives final EPA approval

An industrial composting facility in Melbourne’s Dandenong South has received final environmental approval from EPA Victoria.

The facility is operated by international waste management company Sacyr, with a biological and air treatment system designed by Waste Treatment Technologies.

The $65 million facility operates under a contract negotiated by the Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Group (MWRRG) on behalf of eight councils.

“Through this collaborative contract, Sacyr Environment Australia receives enough kerbside material to run its facility, which has processing capacity of up to 120,000 tonnes annually,” a MWRRG statement reads.

The facility is a part of Melbourne’s food and green waste processing network, which has a target of 400,000 tonnes of capacity by 2021, as set out in the Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Implementation Plan.

The facility, operating with conditional approval from the EPA, has processed household food and green waste from Melbourne’s south east since May 2019.

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MWRRG opens EOIs for advanced waste processing facility

The Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Group (MWRRG) has opened expressions of interest to design, build and operate an advanced waste processing facility for Melbourne’s household rubbish.

According to WWRRG CEO Jill Riseley, the tender is largest of its kind ever undertaken by Melbourne councils.

“Advanced waste processing solutions will play a significant role in achieving the Victorian Government’s new target to divert 80 per cent of household rubbish from landfill by 2030,” she said.

“Sixteen councils from the south east of Melbourne are involved in the tender, and together the councils collected over 490,000 tonnes of residual rubbish in 2016. This is forecast to grow to over 700,000 tonnes a year by 2046.”

Starting with the call for expressions of interest, Ms Riseley said the procurement process would take approximately two years.

“The procurement will focus on the financial, environmental and social outcomes councils want to achieve rather than specify a technology,” she said.

“It will be up to bidders to recommend proven and appropriate solutions, and to demonstrate how they deliver on councils’ objectives.”

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Immersed in industry: VWMA Waste Expo site tours

The Victorian Waste Management Association’s recent industry site tours took delegates through a range of resource recovery and manufacturing facilities.

The partnership between the Victorian Waste Management Association (VWMA) and Waste Expo Australia was particularly significant in 2019, given current challenges facing the Victorian arm of the sector.

While the event had a national focus, Mark Smith, VWMA Executive Officer, says Victoria was lucky to have Waste Expo located in Melbourne.

“We support Waste Expo because of the relevance this national event brings to the Victorian landscape, with thought provoking discussions and presentations on everything important and impactful to the sector,” he says.

As a strategic Waste Expo partner, VWMA ran three concurrent industry tours on the Friday following the expo, a first for the leading waste and resource recovery event.

Hosting a wide range of delegates including representatives from the Metropolitan Waste and Resource Recovery Group, industry heavy weights such as TOMRA, local government agents and small business owners, VWMA’s tours were designed to educate and stimulate conversation.

The day’s events included a construction and demolition tour, an organics tour and a packaging process tour.

“Working with industry partners Alex Fraser, the Australian Packaging and Covenant Organisation (APCO) and the Australian Organic Recycling Association (AORA), VWMA ran the tours to bring the steps industry is taking to support Victoria’s recycling agenda into focus,” Mark says.

As attendees gathered at the Melbourne Convention Centre on Friday morning, many expressed difficulty over choosing which tour to attend.

After an opening address from Mark, delegates piled into three separate buses, each with an industry specific tour guide.

The construction and demolition tour, sponsored by Alex Fraser, included site visits to Bingo Industries West Melbourne Facility, Alex Fraser’s Sustainable Supply Hub, a Level Crossing Removal Project site and the Toll Shipping’s terminal at Webb Dock.

Bingo Industries West Melbourne Facility is established on a site acquired 18 months ago by the company, with Bingo pouring $23 million into the facility since then. The site allows Bingo to convert waste into seven different products and has capacity for around 300,000 tonnes per annum. The company aims to achieve a 75 per cent recovery rate on-site.

At Webb Dock, Alex Fraser has worked with contractor Civilex to develop a heavy-duty pavement which incorporates reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) that meets VicRoads guidelines. The pavement base layers are comprised recycled glass sand and recycled concrete.

As part of the Level Crossing Removal Project, the Western Program Alliance used Alex Fraser’s recycled sand as bedding material for the combined services conduit housing the communications and power cables. The grade separation was undertaken at Kororoit Creek Road in Melbourne. The low embodied energy material replaces virgin sand with all 900 tonnes diverted from landfill at a lower cost.

Finally, Waste Management Review got to explore where Alex Fraser’s recycling happens, touring its Laverton North supply hub where more than one million tonnes of C&D waste, and one billion bottles of glass waste is reprocessed to make the quality construction materials needed to build greener roads.

A climb to the top of Alex Fraser’s high recycled technology asphalt plant topped off the excursion. The new $18 million faciliity is capable of producing over half a million tonnes of green asphalt per year, utilising the recycled glass sand and RAP produced in its collocated recycling facilities.

Shifting material focus, the Organics and Composting Tour’s first stop took attendees to the South Melbourne Market, where they were told about the market’s 32 tonne a year dehydrating compost initiative.

From there, VWMA and AORA directed the tour bus to Sacyr’s new indoor compositing facility. Michael Wood, Sacyr Environment Australia Consultant, guided the group through the 120,000 tonnes per annum facility, and explained the challenges associated with adapting a European model to an Australian environment.

The group was then guided through Cleanaway’s South East Organic Processing Facility and food depackaging unit.

Melinda Lizza, Cleanaway Development Manager, explained the depackaging unit’s 150,000 tonnes per annum capabilities, before handing the tour over to Michael Lawlor, Cleanaway Operations Supervisor.

After the tour, the group had lunch with the Cleanaway crew and discussed interactions with the EPA and growing levels of scrutiny on the compost industry.

From there, the group was driven to Bio Gro’s Dandenong South Facility, where Sage Hahn, Bio Gro General Manger, explained the company’s approach to organics diversion and composted mulch production.

After taking the group through the Bio Gro site, Sage fielded a range of technical questions and detailed the mineral additive process of mulch manufacturing.

Doug Wilson, AROA Victoria Admin Officer and compost group tour guide, says the day allowed delegates to closely inspect organics processing.

“At the very time when the state government is bringing the circular economy into focus, the organics tour took delegates on an interactive experience with some of Melbourne’s most exciting and innovative organics recovery technology,” he says.

The APCO packing tour, which was delivered in partnership with the Australian Food and Grocery Council and Australian Institute of Packaging, took attendees to Ego Pharmaceuticals, the South Melbourne Markets and recycled plastic manufacturer Replas’ Carrum Downs site.

Of the APCO tour, Mark says industry is at a critical time where collaboration is essential to address challenges in the packaging supply chain and achieve the 2025 National Packaging Targets.

“Great stuff happens all across Australia by the waste and recycling industry and many organisatsions that we partner with,” Mark says.

He added that these were areas of interest that were not spoken about enough.

“It was exciting to see demonstrations of the circular economy in action. Parts of our sector are leading on this front and there are scale interventions that only really need the appropriate government policy to delivery environmental, economic and social benefits to Australia.”

He says this was clearly demonstrated on the tours in the Victoria context.

“Industry is leading on parts of this and it’s important to acknowledge the good work being done locally.

“A big thanks to all our partners for coming on board and collaborating with us.”

This article was published in the December issue of Waste Management Review. 

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