Australia Post commits to recycled plastic satchels

Australia Post has announced that 100 per cent of its plastic satchel range will be made from recycled content by 2021.

Making the announcement at the National Plastics Summit in Canberra, Executive General Manager Community and Consumer Nicole Sheffield said the commitment underlined the company’s drive towards a sustainable future.

“Australia Post continues to incorporate sustainable design principles in the development of our packaging, as we reduce greenhouse gas emissions, non-renewable resource use and water consumption,” she said.

“As online shopping grows, Australia Post is focused on reducing the quantity of non-recycled packaging that moves through our network.”

The announcement comes on the back of Australia Post joining with one of its major customers, Country Road, to launch its first recycled plastic satchel in December 2019.

“The new satchel is made of recycled plastic, sending a clear signal to the market that major Australian brands are committed to eliminating the use of virgin plastic across our packaging supply chain,” Ms Sheffield said.

Australia Post has been a signatory of the Australian Packaging Covenant Organisation APCO since 2005, joining other major businesses and government to work towards the national packaging targets.

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Federal Govt commits to dollar for dollar infrastructure investment

In a speech to the first ever National Plastics Summit in Canberra, Prime Minister Scott Morrison pledged to match industry investment in recycling infrastructure dollar for dollar.

With Australia’s recycling facilities “under severe strain”, the Prime Minister said the Federal Government would invest in technological innovation to maximise the value of recycled products.

“I will have more to say on this closer to the up-coming budget, but the Commonwealth stands ready to work with the states, to co-invest in these critical infrastructure facilities, and with industry,” Mr Morrison said.

“We are working with state and territory governments to identify and unlock the critical upgrades that will lead to a step-change in their recycling capacity. And we will invest in these facilities with governments and with industry on a one-to-one-to-one basis.”

Furthermore, Mr Morrison announced plans to strengthen the Commonwealth Procurement Guideline, to ensure “every procurement undertaken by a Commonwealth agency considers environmental sustainability and the use of recycled content as a factor in determining value for money.”

In his address, Mr Morrison highlighted demand as central to long-term industry sustainability.

“We know that banning the export of waste plastics will keep more of the raw stock here for use, and lifting industry capacity will increase our ability to use these materials constructively. But to make the system really hum, we need to build the market,” he said.

“The global recycled plastics market is expected to grow at 7.9 per cent annually over the next decade, they are phenomenal figures, and be worth almost $67 billion in 2025. Industry is not blind to the incredible potential here.”

Of the summit, Australian Council of Recycling (ACOR) CEO Pete Shmigel said the Federal Government was creating an unprecedented opportunity to reduce Australia’s plastics and greenhouse gas footprint.

“Prime Minister Morrison and his Ministerial colleagues have acted with total clarity and fast pace to put plastic waste minimisation near the top of their agenda,” he said.

“A summit that puts substance before stylistics is what we need to deal with the plastics problem, including our comparatively very low recycling rate of some 12 per cent and our lack of domestic recycling capacity.”

According to Mr Shmigel, improved plastic recycling is an affordable and accessible way to take practical and positive climate action.

“Support for putting recycled content plastic into irrigation pipes, channel lining and rainwater tanks would be a great way to assist drought-proofing while supporting Australian manufacturers,” he said.

“From all players involved in plastics management, from the government to brand owners to recyclers to the community, it’s time for real action not rhetoric, and that’s what the summit will be judged by.”

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