NSW opens $1.5M grants to tackle illegal dumping

The NSW Government is encouraging councils, public land managers and community groups to apply for grants to tackle illegal dumping in their local area.

The grants are a part of the NSW Combating Illegal Dumping Clean-up and Prevention program, which has awarded $6.7 million to projects to combat illegal dumping since the program commenced.

According to Circular Economy and Resource Management Executive Director Sanjay Sridher, illegally dumped waste clean ups costs millions of dollars in taxpayers money each year.

“We want to see as many applicants as possible apply for funding, with previous grants being put to great use to tackle local dumping hotspots,” he said.

“This has included the installation of gates, signs, surveillance cameras and fencing to tackle illegal dumping, along with the removal of thousands of tonnes of illegally dumped waste.

“I encourage any councils, public land managers or community groups that want to tackle an illegal dumping problem in their area to visit the website and apply for one of these grants.”

Funded under the Waste Less Recycle More initiative and administered by the Department of Planning, Industry and Environment (DPIE), grants can be used to implement prevention and clean-up action on publicly managed land, or to establish illegal dumping baseline data.

An additional $1.17 million is also available for community groups, councils and businesses to address litter in their local area through DPIE’s community litter and cigarette butt litter prevention programs.

The litter grants can be used to fund a number of litter initiatives including community education and engagement, clean-ups and new bin infrastructure, with programs aimed at addressing littering and strengthening the capacity of communities to take local ownership.

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NSW transfer station awarded $66K weighbridge grant

Waste 360 has been awarded a $66,496 grant from the NSW Planning, Industry and Environment Department to install a weighbridge at its new transfer station in Strathfield, NSW.

According to Planning, Industry and Environment Department Circular Economy Executive Director Sanjay Sridher, the grant was awarded under the Waste Less, Recycle More Initiative’s Weighbridge Fund.

“The weighbridge will enable Waste 360 to collect valuable data that helps to provide more accurate information on the volumes of waste and recyclables generated in NSW and supports improved environmental performance across the state,” he said.

Mr Sridher said this was the final round of funding under the Weighbridge Fund grants program.

“Over 35 waste and recycling facilities have received more than $2 million in grants under the Waste Less, Recycle More initiative to support the installation of weighbridges,” he said.

“This program has played an important role to support the modernisation of the waste sector in NSW. Better data collection through the use of weighbridges at licensed facilities improves understanding of the volumes of waste and recyclables, and facilitates the collection and payment of the waste and environment levy.”

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NSW awards litter prevention grants

The NSW Government has awarded more than $930,000 to councils and community groups under the latest round of litter prevention grants.

Planning, Industry and Environment Department Circular Economy Executive Director Sanjay Sridher said funding has been awarded to 13 local councils in both metro and regional NSW.

“They include cleaning up and preventing litter at transport interchanges in Blacktown, preventing litter at tourist hotspots in Byron Bay and funding for solar smart bins in Forbes, which will send an alert to the council when a bin is full,” he said.

“Nobody likes to see litter in their parks or waterways, and tackling the problem at a local level – through the councils and groups that really know the area – is an effective way to prevent litter for the long term.”

According to Mr Sridher, eight community groups have also received funding.

Projects include reducing plastic at Lake Macquarie Cafes, support for the Airds Clean Up Crew in the Macarthur area and helping Tathra Surf Life Saving Club with its clean-up and litter patrols.

“Now it’s a matter of making sure the right programs are in place to clean-up hotspots and give tossers a nudge when it comes to disposing of rubbish properly,” Mr Sridher said.

The grants program is supported by NSW’s first litter prevention strategy, which sets out actions and timeframes to achieve the state government’s target to reduce the volume of litter in NSW by 40 per cent by 2020.

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Bin Trim opens $4.9 million grant round

A total of $4.9 million in grant funding is now available to help NSW businesses cut waste and increase recycling, as part of the state government’s Bin Trim program.

Waste and recycling service providers, equipment providers, consultants, councils and not-for-profit organisations can apply for the grants, which range from $50,000 to $300,000.

Planning, Industry and Environment Department Circular Economy Executive Director Sanjay Sridher said reducing waste sent to landfill has environmental and economic benefits for everyone.

“NSW businesses send more than 1.8 million tonnes of waste to landfill each year. From cardboard, paper and plastic through to food waste,” Mr Sridher said.

“So much of this ends up in the general waste bin, when in fact more than 70 per cent could be re-used or recycled.”

Bin Trim, administered through the state’s Waste Less, Recycle More initiative, funds waste assessments for NSW businesses with up to 400 full time equivalent employees.

Waste experts undertake free assessments, entering waste data into an online Bin Trim App that generates a tailored action plan. The assessor also provides support and implementation advice.

Additionally, participating businesses are eligible for a Bin Trim rebate to cover 50 per cent of recycling equipment costs, up to $50,000.

According to Mr Sridher, Bin Trim has helped over 29,000 businesses and diverted 70,000 tonnes of waste from landfill.

“Businesses taking part in the program are helping the environment, with 94 per cent of Bin Trim participants implementing actions to reduce the amount of waste they send to landfill,” Mr Sridher said.

Applications close 28 February 2020.

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NSW awards $1M to community recycling centres

Six NSW councils have received funding to develop recycling facilities for problem household waste such as oils, paints and gas bottles.

Planning and Environment Department Circular Economy Executive Director Sanjay Sridher said $1.125 million would go towards developing the new community recycling centres and permanent drop-off facilities.

“Community recycling centres are designed to capture those tricky items that can’t go in the bin – things like motor oils, car batteries, even old fluoro lightbulbs,” Mr Sridher said.

“These kinds of items have materials in them that can’t be processed through our kerbside systems, but through community recycling centres, most of these problem wastes can be reused or recycled.”

Awarded local government areas include Blue Mountains City Council, Camden Council, Parkes Shire Council, City of Parramatta Council, City of Ryde Council and Wollondilly Shire Council.

According to Mr Sridher, more than 7.5 million kilograms of problem waste has been collected since the program began, including four million kilograms of paint, one million kilogram of gas cylinders and 247,000 kilograms of batteries.

To date, over 100 community recycling centres have been funded in NSW and 92 are currently in operation.

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