More teeth, more traction and compaction: GCM Enviro

With sustainable landfills representing a critical competent of the waste management ecosystem, GCM Enviro details the importance of high-density compaction. 

Basic supply and demand economics, paired with resource recovery infrastructure shortages and still developing technologies, means sustainable landfill management remains a critical feature of any well-functioning waste management system.

To that end, GCM Enviro, a leading distributor of waste management equipment, is investing heavily in sustainable and efficient landfill compactors.

As the exclusive Australian supplier of Tana landfill compactors, Susie Solbrandt, GCM Marketing, says GCM are well placed to provide high compaction machinery that saves landfill airspace and reduces leachate generation.

This is highlighted by the company’s introduction of Tana’s specialised high-density drums to the Australian market in 2019.

“Tana’s high-density drums can be fitted to all Tana E Series Landfill Compactors, facilitating higher compaction rates via crushing force. The drums improve traction and efficiency, thereby increasing an operator’s ability to compact waste in shorter intervals,” Susie says.

With 14 teeth per 11 rows, compared to the standard Tana BigFoot drum’s 10 teeth per row, the high-density drums provide greater material engagement for each drum rotation.

This Susie says, shreds waste into more uniform sized particles, with 154 crushing feet per drum, compared to a standard drum’s 110 feet.

Susie adds that the new high-density drums produce a compaction capacity of 1150 metres cubed per hour, compared to the standard drum’s 950.

According to Susie, GCM sold a new Tana E520 Landfill Compactor to a major New Zealand waste operator in late 2019. Since running the updated high-density drum, have noticed significant compaction improvements.

Operating one of New Zealand’s largest landfills in North Waikato, Hampton Downs, the company have extensive experience in the design, construction and operation of modern landfills and cleanfills.

Susie says reports from the company show the new high-density drums are low maintenance, with superior climbing efficiency and fuel burn.

She adds that with fewer passes, simplified maintenance and good drivability, Tana E Series Compactors work to save expensive landfill airspace.

“GCM’s philosophy is to maintain constant dialogue between manufacturers and clients to ensure equipment design is governed by market requirements, particularly in the harsh climatic conditions we experience,” Susie says.

“Ultimately, our objective is to enable customers to increase revenue with cutting edge technology, allowing them to generate value from waste.”

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TANA Shark waste shredder

Recycling rates are increasing globally and new possibilities for using waste as a resource are opening up every year. Legislation aimed at reducing disposal to landfill means new methods of resource recovery, including waste-to-energy are leading to a variety of novel systems and processes. Because the business environment is constantly changing, having a versatile machine is invaluable.

The TANA Shark waste shredder was designed with exactly this in mind. The slow-speed multipurpose waste shredder is suitable for a variety of tasks, including pre-shredding, secondary shredding, small particle size shredding and in-line systems. It can shred a wide variety of materials, ranging from tyres, commercial and industrial waste construction, plastics to mattresses. The TANA Shark waste shredder enables full control over the particle size from 50 to 500 millimetres (two to 20 inches) with low operation costs and a possibility to perform shredding in just one pass.

One of the most problematic yet growing areas of recycling is end-of-life tyres. The TANA Shark 440 waste shredder can be used to shred tyres, with sizes ranging from car and truck tyres up to heavy earthmoving and mining.

Ensuring the end result is pure rubber without any metal wires, TANA Shark 440 takes care of the shredding process, whether its a pre-shred from 500 millimetre minus or a finished product of 50 millimetre minus.

In the primary shredding phases, unwanted metal wires are removed using an over-band magnet and a range of screens which are inserted below the rotor to generate a particular size of material. The end product size and quality can be determined and finalised by using a rotor screen with suitable mesh size out of the six available, ranging from 35 up to 220 millimetres.

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