Federal Govt offer waste battery export guidance

The Federal Government’s Department of the Environment and Energy has released a report that offers guidance on whether a hazardous waste permit is required to export waste batteries to another country.

Batteries can increase the risk of toxic chemicals polluting the environment if not disposed of properly.

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The report clarifies the Federal Government’s position on the status of batteries as hazardous waste under the Hazardous Waste (Regulation of Exports and Imports Act) 1989 (the Act) and Hazardous Waste (Regulation of Exports and Imports) (OECD Decision) Regulations 1996 (the OECD Regulations).

Alkaline, nickel-metal hydride, zinc-carbon and zinc chloride waste batteries are considered by the Federal Government to not require an import permit, as long as they are not flammable, explosive or toxic.

These batteries are considered to be in List B for the Basel Convention for international transport of potentially hazardous waste.

The Federal Government said it is the responsibility of the waste exporter to check whether the destination and transit countries require a hazardous waste permit to import waste batteries.

The report can be read here.

Moranbah Resource Recovery Centre finished in Queensland

A major project has been completed in central Queensland to improve the region’s waste disposal network.

The $7.16 million Moranbah Resource Recovery Centre Expansion and Improvement Project was first started in March 2017 and has seen over 28 Olympic swimming pools worth of soil excavated.

FK Gardner & Sons were awarded the construction tender in February 2017 and sourced local contractors to work on the project.

The centre now has a new landfill cell, stormwater and leachate ponds, and a refuse transfer station.

According to the Isaac Council, the transfer station will enable the bulk handling of waste and improve hygiene and safety for the community and landfill employees.

Isaac Regional Council Mayor Anne Baker said the project was vital to meeting demand for waste disposal in the region and improving environmental performance.

“This upgrade is critical in ensuring Moranbah can meet demand for the provision of waste infrastructure to serve the regional community, mining sector and supporting industries,” Mayor Baker said.

“Isaac Regional Council matched the Queensland Government’s $3.58 million funding under the Building our Regions program.”

Queensland Minister for State Development, Manufacturing, Infrastructure and Planning Cameron Dick said Building our Regions was all about making sure communities such as those in the Isaac region benefit from the state’s economic successes.

“The Moranbah Resource Recovery Centre project will improve operational efficiencies and extend the lifespan of the landfill reserve.

“It will meet community and industry waste management requirements and improve the efficiency and recovery of recyclable materials.

“The transfer station became operational on September 25, 2017 and the new landfill cell is expected to accept waste from February 2018.”

Waste 2017

2-4 May 2017
Coffs Harbour, NSW

 “Coffs” is regarded by many as the leading conference for the waste management industry in Australia.

Attracting more than 550 delegates, over 80 sponsors and exhibitors, and in excess of 90 presenters, it is designed for those who work in or have an interest in waste management issues, particularly in local government. The conference program will be released and registration opens for the event in February.

www.coffswasteconference.com.au

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