Wastech Engineering’s Bramidan Balers

Manufactured in Denmark and highly regarded for their design and quality, Bramidan Balers are globally recognised for delivering efficient waste management solutions.

Available in Australia exclusively through Wastech Engineering, Bramidan Balers are capable of compacting a wide range of materials including cardboard, plastic, e-waste and metals.

With a broad choice of Bramidan Baler models available, the crushers are ideal for businesses with a wide range of waste volumes, from small retail outlets to high capacity waste transfer stations.

For larger demands, Wastech offer the X25, which is equipped with cross cylinders to give operators stable compression and superior press force. Combined with a long stroke, a high bale weight can be achieved.

The cardboard and plastic baler is designed with easy servicing in mind, with the hydraulic unit mounted below the control panel on the side of the machine.

For service users with smaller amounts of waste, but who still need a machine to handle bulky materials, Wastech suggests the B5 W baler.

The machine is characterised by a wide filling opening of one metre, which is an advantage when handling larger cardboard boxes. The chamber is equipped with rows of efficient barbs, which keep the material back and ensure optimum filling.

An efficient and silent ejecting system ensures easy handling of the compressed bale, while the strap rolls are simple to replace in front of the machine.

Free on-site trials and flexible rental options are available. For more information click here.

Waste without wheels: Wastech Engineering

Wastech Engineering’s Neil Bone details the companies multi-pronged approach to innovation in the waste transport space.

With over 27 years’ experience providing transport solutions to the waste and resource recovery sector, Wastech Engineering is committed to solving customer’s problems now more than ever.

Neil Bone, Wastech Engineering Managing Director, says while the current global climate poses a number of challenges, it’s imperative for the waste industry to remain strong and forward focused.

Highlighting the United Nation’s recent call for global governments to recognise waste as an essential service, Neil says Wastech are poised to support sector growth with high-quality and efficient waste transport solutions.      

According to Neil, Wastech’s Flexus Balasystem is a streamlined, next-generation approach to waste transport. This is, he adds, despite its lack of wheels or “vehicle” capabilities.

The Flexus Balasystem, which functions like a satellite hub or transfer station, is a complete heavy-duty system for bailing, storing and transporting compressed waste in round bales.

With a processing capacity of up to 30 tonnes per hour, the Flexus unit has a helicopter-style wrapping component, with bale ejection at either side of the machine.

“Finished bales are ejected onto a bale conveyor that holds up to three finished bales at once. These can then be loaded onto standard road and rail trailers for transfer,” Neil says.

“By compressing material before it’s transported, operators stand to save significant time, reduced emissions and increased payloads, with the level of material transported in a single trip multiplied significantly.”   

As an all in one system, Neil says the Flexus is cost effective, with a single machine fulfilling all required tasked along the chain. Flexus has a small footprint and low civil costs, with compacted and wrapped bales sealed in modular cells that can be stored on site.

This, Neil says, provides operator flexibility by allowing transport out of peak traffic times.

“Standard road and rail trailers can be used to keep logistics cost down, which eliminates the risk of trailer downtime and provides a competitive logistics environment with low operating expenses. Furthermore, as bales can be transported using any kind of trailer, back freight can be easily sourced.

“Since the waste is baled, the trailer remains clean and freight can be brought back to the hub,” Neil says.

The system is available in three different models and is suitable for a variety of waste types including municipal solid waste, solid recovered fuel and recyclables.

“All of our Flexus bailing systems are tough and high-powered, providing clients many years of reliable service,” Neil says.

Related stories: 

Wastech’s CP Auger Screen

Wastech Engineering has released its newest screening technology from its partner, the CP Group – the CP Auger Screen.

The anti-wrapping, non-blinding screen was developed specifically for materials recovery facilities.

The trademark CP Auger Screen sizes material by using a series of cantilevered augers that do not wrap or jam due to their corkscrewing motion.

Any material that could wrap, such as strapping, hoses or plastic film, are released off the end of the auger.

Its low-wear augers are made from abrasion-resistant steel, making them durable while requiring little to no maintenance.

The CP Auger Screen can be used in various recycling applications, including commingled, municipal solid waste, construction and demolition and commercial and industrial wastes.

The largest model can handle 30 tonnes per hour of inbound single stream material, 55 tonnes per hour of commercial and 70 tonnes per hour for construction and demolition material.

The machine is unique compared to traditional disc screens as the auger rotors act like a corkscrew, conveying any stringy materials over the side. The cantilevered augers convey large flat materials over, while fines and flexible fibre go through the augers or out the side of the screen.

For more information visit: https://wastech.com.au/ 

Atritor Turbo Separator: Wastech Engineering

The Atritor Turbo Separator was developed to separate products from their packaging, releasing them for recycling or disposal.

Available through Australian distributor Wastech Engineering, the Turbo Separator enables up to 99 per cent of dry or liquid products to be separated from their packaging with minimal contamination. This allows the contents to be used for compost, anaerobic digestion or animal feedstock.

The Turbo Separator can be manufactured in a range of throughputs up to 20 tonnes per hour.

Additionally, the process is so efficient that it leaves packaging relatively intact and clean to facilitate downstream recycling. According to Wastech, when compared to other methods of packaging separation, the Turbo Separator achieves higher separation efficiencies with lower power consumption, resulting in reduced operating costs.

The Turbo Separator is ideal for separating out of specification, out-of-date and mislabelled products from a variety of packaging, including cans, plastic bottles and boxes. The diverse range of applications includes the separation of paper from gypsum in plasterboard, general foodstuffs from their packaging and liquids from their containers.

It is available complete with in-feed and out-feed conveyors and liquid transfer pumps. The Turbo Separator, with its durable construction and adjustable paddles, enables the separation of a wide variety of products.

Each Turbo Separator installation can be configured to suit multiple applications and a variable shaft speed enables enhanced separation efficiency. The machine is available in mild steel and stainless steel to suit the application.

Single-stream success: Wastech Engineering

Wastech Engineering’s Scott Foulds highlights the latest technologies to support a variety of materials recovery facilities.

When Freshkills Landfill in Staten Island, New York, one of the largest landfills in the world, closed at the end of 2001, it forced the City of New York to explore alternative waste management options.

One option mooted in the early 2000s to fill the gap was a materials recovery facility (MRF). According to a research paper published by the Department of Earth and Environmental Engineering, a 150-ton-per-hour facility could handle all of New York City’s recyclables. The operations within the MRF were proposed to be as automated as possible, increasing speed of operation, reducing costs and improving material recovery.

More than a decade on, New York City and other cities across the globe have embraced best practice, with the next generation of screens, optical sorters and air separation technology providing an end-to-end solution.

In leveraging more than 25 years’ experience supplying waste and recycling equipment, Wastech Engineering has been offering technologies to allow MRFs to sort and separate a wide range of waste streams.

Wastech’s commingled recycling screen range features the latest in design and engineering from their US partner The CP Group. From the proprietary cam-disc style CP Screen (polishing screen) to the OCC Screen and Auger Screens, the CP Group continues to set the pace for screening technology in kerbside recycling.

Scott Foulds, Operations Manager at Wastech, says the company’s range of screens provide full flexibility in MRF design for sorting and separating of various commodities.

“The flexibility of the MRF design, including which streams are captured, is ultimately designed around the outputs the customer wants for the markets they will sell into,” Scott explains.

“The CP Group in the US has implemented an extensive research and development program over the past 10 years to develop their screens to minimise wrapping and increase efficiency in seperation.”

Scott says the OCC Screen is an essential machine for any MRF. The screen effectively separates old corrugated cardboard (OCC) from other mixed fibre, containers and debris. Characterised by its low maintenance and wrapping design, the screen drops all material under 300 millimetres through the screen for further sorting.

“99 per cent of what goes over the OCC Screen will be clean cardboard with a very high purity rate so you don’t need quality control,” Scott says.

He says the steel discs and shafts have been designed for reduced wrapping, with a lifespan of around 15-plus years due to their robust construction and quality design.

The glass breaker screen is the next step in the process which breaks and separates glass and fines down to a 50-millimetre-minus product. The glass is removed early in the sorting process to protect the longevity of the equipment upstream.

Air separation technology can then remove light materials from glass such as small fibre, organics and plastics, with Wastech offering a host of systems through The CP Group or Impact Air.

The NewScreen is ideal for MRFs processing higher volumes that want to capture old newsprint. It is designed to automatically separate large fibre from mixed paper, containers and debris.

“If you’re operating a smaller MRF, then the CP Screen could recover all the fibre. But it does come down to what markets the customer has to sell their products into. If they’ve got a market for mixed paper, newsprint and cardboard, it’s better to separate those items, especially if the end user is getting good value for money,” Scott explains.

The CP Screen ensures a clean stream of paper by eliminating residues such as small fibres and organic material by dropping this out through the screen. The paper (2D material) goes over the top of the screen and the containers (3D material) go off the back of the screen. The CP rubber disc screens can be adjusted for speed and inclination, allowing it to be varied from 30 to 40 degrees, which help improve the efficiency and quality of the screen’s functionality.

Scott says the CP Screen has numerous advantages over other separators, namely the quantity of throughput and quality of separation.

In continuing to expand its offering to Australian MRF operators, Wastech launched the CP Auger Screen in 2018 – which enables accurate separation of newsprint and large fibres from the material stream early in the separation process. This is particularly useful in higher volume MRFs.

While robotics is largely an emerging technology, Scott says a variety of optical sorters can be used instead to sort fibre and containers and achieve high throughput, capture rates and quality outputs.

“As an alternative to robotics, we’ve come up with a different design in our optical sorting range where we use a single line optical sorter on the container line.

“All the containers pass through an optical sorting head which determines the container type, whether it be aluminium, PET, HDPE or liquid paperboard.”

The container is then ejected into the designated hopper as it passes down the conveyor line. Scott says all of Wastech’s products are backed up by its 24-hour Service Centre, with 15 service vehicles on the road nationally.

Related stories:

X